The Eventful History of the Mutiny and Piratical Seizure of H. M. S. Bounty: Its Causes and Consequences

Forsideomslag
J. Murray, 1831 - 356 sider
A must-read for true-crime buffs and fans of maritime history, The Eventful History of the Mutiny and Piratical Seizure of H.M.S. Bounty: Its Cause and Consequences is widely recognized as the most detailed historical account of the mutiny on the Bounty that has spawned dozens of novels, movies, and other pop-culture retellings.
 

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Side 241 - Well believe this, No ceremony that to great ones 'longs, Not the king's crown, nor the deputed sword, The marshal's truncheon, nor the judge's robe, Become them with one half so good a grace, As mercy does.
Side 59 - Horror and doubt distract His troubled thoughts, and from the bottom stir The hell within him ; for within him Hell He brings, and round about him, nor from Hell One step, no more than from himself, can fly By change of place.
Side 232 - Judge, before whom all hearts are open and from whom no secrets are hid.
Side 167 - As eager to anticipate their grave ; And the sea yawn'd around her like a hell, And down she suck'd with her the whirling wave, Like one who grapples with his enemy, And strives to strangle him before he die.
Side 146 - If by your art, my dearest father, you have Put the wild waters in this roar, allay them : The sky, it seems, would pour down stinking pitch, But that the sea, mounting to the welkin's cheek, Dashes the fire out.
Side 167 - Like one who grapples with his enemy, And strives to strangle him before he die. And first one universal shriek there rush'd, Louder than the loud ocean, like a crash Of echoing thunder; and then all was hush'd, Save the wild wind and the remorseless dash Of billows; but at intervals there gush'd, Accompanied with a convulsive splash, A solitary shriek, the bubbling cry Of some strong swimmer in his agony.
Side 62 - I saw, had an inclination to assist me, and as he fed me with shaddock (my lips being quite parched) we explained our wishes to each other by our looks; but, this being observed, Martin was removed from me.
Side 170 - tis but the same; My pang shall find a voice. From my youth upwards My spirit walk'd not with the souls of men, Nor look'd upon the earth with human eyes ; The thirst of their ambition was not mine, The aim of their existence was not mine ; My joys, my griefs, my passions, and my powers, Made me a stranger ; though I wore the form, I had no sympathy with breathing flesh, Nor midst the creatures of clay that girded me Was there but one who but of her anon.
Side 285 - As he wore no clothes except a piece of cloth round his loins, and a straw hat, ornamented with black cock's feathers, his fine figure and well-shaped muscular limbs were displayed to great advantage, and attracted general admiration. His body was much tanned by exposure to the weather, and his countenance had a brownish cast, unmixed, however, with that tinge of red so common among the natives of...
Side 67 - ... .Notwithstanding the roughness with which I was treated, the remembrance of past kindnesses produced some signs of remorse in Christian. When they were forcing me out of the ship, I asked him if this treatment was a proper return for the many instances he had received of my friendship ? he appeared disturbed at my question, and answered, with much emotion, " That, Captain Bligh, that is the thing ; — I am in hell...

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