The Constitutional History of England Since the Accession of George the Third, 1760-1860, Bind 1

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1906
 

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Side 160 - Having once given her sanction to a measure, that it be not arbitrarily altered or modified by the Minister ; such an act she must consider as failing in sincerity towards the Crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her Constitutional right of dismissing that Minister.
Side 9 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton ; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...
Side 184 - ... natural and accustomed support, a scheme for disconnecting the authority to command service, from the power of animating it by reward; and for allotting to the prince all the invidious duties of government, without the means of softening them to the public, by any one act of grace, favour, or benignity.
Side 69 - That it is now necessary to declare that to report any opinion or pretended opinion of His Majesty upon any Bill or other proceeding depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the Members, is a high crime and misdemeanor, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the Constitution of this country.
Side 215 - And be it enacted, that the lord president of the council, the lord privy seal, the first lord of the treasury, the principal secretaries of state, and the chancellor of the exchequer for the tune being, shall, by virtue of their respective offices, be, and they are hereby declared to be, commissioners for the affairs of India...
Side 259 - ... such persons only as have just claims on the royal beneficence, or who, by their personal services to the crown, by the performance of duties to the public, or by their useful discoveries in science, and attainments in literature and the arts, have merited the gracious consideration of their Sovereign, and the gratitude of their country.
Side 392 - Before the end of this century, either the Parliament will reform itself from within, or be reformed with a vengeance from without."8 The next scheme was that of a very notable poli- Mr wilkes,8 tician, Mr.
Side 69 - ... to report any opinion, or pretended opinion, of his Majesty upon any bill, or other proceeding, depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the members, is a high crime and misdemeanor, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the constitution of this country...
Side 397 - That leave be given to bring in a Bill to amend the Representation of the People of England in Parliament.
Side 127 - Peel of the same day, are of opinion that, for the purpose of giving to the administration that character of efficiency and stability, and those marks of the constitutional support of the crown, which are required to enable it to act usefully...

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