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CONTENTS OF VOL. XI.

Page.

Page.

ART. I. THE HISTORICAL AND ART. VIII. PUBLIC LIBRARIES,

GEOLOGICAL DELUGES Com- By Prof, R. B. Patton, . 174

PARED. By Prof. Hitchcock, 1

ART. IX, DESIGN OF THEOLO-

ART. II. THE UTILITY OF THE GICAL SEMINARIES. By Prof.
STUDY OF THE CLASSICS TO L. P. Hickok,

187

THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS. By

J, Packard,

28 Art. X. ON THE INFREQUENCY

OF THE ALLUSIONS TO CHRIS-

ART. III. LITERARY IMPOSTURES. TIANITY IN GREEK AND Ro-

By D. Fosdick, Jr..

39 MAN WRITERS. Translated

from the Latin of H. T. Tschir-

ART. IV. THE ADVANCEMENT

by Prof. H. B. Hackett, 203

OF BIBLICAL KNOWLEDGE. By

Prof. E. P. Barrows,

60 Art. XI. CONNECTION OF THE

OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS.

Art. V. ON THE NATURE OF IN-

Translated from the German

STINCT. By Samuel Fish, M. of Prof. Twesten, of Berlin, by

D. Boston,

74 Prof, B, B. Edwards,

232

ART. VI, FRATERNAL APPEAL ART. XII. CRITICAL Notices, 245

TO THE AMERICAN CHURCHES, 1. Union Bible Dictionary,

245

TOGETHER WITH A PLAN FOR 2. Works of Henry Hallam,

247

CATHOLIC UNION ON APOSTOL- 3. James's Christian Professor, 233

ic PRINCIPLES, By Prof. S. S. 4. Outlines of a History of the

Schmucker,

86 Court of Rome,

254

5. Wayland's Political Econo-

ART. VII, THE HEBREW TEN-

my, abridged,

257

SES. Translation of Ewald, 6. Principles of Interpreting

with remarks, by M. Stuart, 131 the Prophecies,

257

Syntax of the Verb,

134 7. Works of Joseph Addison, 257

Of the two Modes with Vay rela- 8. The Young Disciple, 259

tive or conversive, the two re- 9. Religious Dissensions, 259

lative historic forms,

137

10. Noyes's Hebrew Prophets, 260

Vav relative with the second 11. The Family Preacher, 261

Mode,

137

12. A Mother's Request,

261

Vav relative with the first Mode, 141

Participle or relative Tense, 143 ART, XIII. SELECT LITERARY

Remarks, by the Translator, 146 AND MISCELLANEOUS INTELLI-

GENCE, ·

262

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Art, I. THE EVIDENCES OF THE THE ACTIVE OBEDIENCE OF
GENUINENESS OF THE Gos-

Christ? By Rev, R. W. Lan-
PELS, BY ANDREWS. Norton, dis, Jeffersonville, Pa. - 448
Vol. I, Reviewed by M. Stuart 265 | Introduction,

448

§ 1. Views entertained by the

Art. II. THE HEAD OF THE Reformers on the doctrine of

Church, HEAD

Justification,

453

THINGS; ILLUSTRATED BY A-

NALOGIES BETWEEN NATURE, ART. VI. HEBREW LEXICOGRA-

PROVIDENCE, AND GRACE. By

Review of J.H. R, Bie.

Prof. W. S. Tyler, Amherst senthal's “ Hebräisches und

College,

344 chaldaisches Schulwörterbuch

aber das alte Testament”-and

ART. III. FRATERNAL APPEAL Prof. W. L. Roy's " Complete

TO THE AMERICAN CHURCHES, Hebrew and English Critical

TOGETHER WITH A PLAN FOR and Pronouncing Dictionary,

CATHOLIC UNION ON APOS- on a New and Improved Plan.'

TOLIC PRINCIPLEs. Concluded

By Prof. I, Nordheimer, 482

from p. 131. By Prof. S. S.

Schmucker,

363 Art. VII. Critical Notices, 503

The Apostolic Protestant Con-

1. Day on the Will,

503

fession, ,

408 2. Sin against the Holy Ghost, 506

1. The Apostles' Creed, 409 3. Schmucker on the Reform-

II. The United Protestant Con-

ation,

507

fession,

409 4. A New Tribute to the Mem-

Mode of Operation,

414 ory of J. B. Taylor, 508

5. Steedman's South Africa, 509

Art. IV. CAUSES OF THE DE- 6. Anglo-Saxon Dictionary,

NIAL OF THE Mosaic ORIGIN 7. Letters from the W. Indies, 512

OF THE PENTATEUCH. Trans- 8. Works of Charles Lamb, 512

lated from the German of Prof. 9. Wayland on Responsibility, 513

Hengstenberg of Berlin, by 10. Works of William Cowper, 514

Rev. E, Ballantine,

416 11. Palfrey on the Jewish Scrip-

Introductory Notice,

416

tures and Antiquities, 515

Shallow and Skeptical Interpre- 12, Prof, Stowe's Report on Ed-

tation,

418 ucation in Europe, . 517

Historical Skepticism,

435 13. Ferdinand and Isabella, 518

Judgment of late Historians, 440 14. Antiquitates Americanae, 520

15, Foreign Standard Literature, 519

ART, V. WHAT WERE TILE VIEWS

ENTERTAINED BY THE EARLY ART. VIII, SELECT LITERARY

REFORMERS ON THE DOCTRINE AND MISCELLANEOUS INTELLI-

OF JUSTIFICATION, Faith, AND GENCE, ..

522

THE

AMERICAN

BIBLICAL REPOSITORY.

NO. XXIX.

JANUARY, 1838.

ARTICLE I.

THE HISTORICAL AND GEOLOGICAL DELUGES COMPARED.

By Edward Hitchcock, Prof. of Chem. and Nat. Hist. Amherst College.

(Concluded from

P.

374. Vol. X.) There is one other branch of the argument for a deluge from diluvial phenomena, which we must not pass in entire silence. It is derived from an examination of the contents of certain caverns and fissures. We can, however, give but very brief view of it; although to make it well understood, requires a volume. And happily that volume has been written. "We refer to Dr. Buckland's Reliquiae Diluvianae.*

In the Repository for January 1837, we expressed doubts as to what were the real opinions of Dr. Buckland at present respecting the geological evidence of a deluge; or rather, how far his opinions, as given in bis Reliquiae, had been modified. On receiving his Bridgewater Treatise, we found that he had not abandoned the opinion that there has been a recent inundation of the earth, as shown by geology: but he doubts whether its identity with the Noachian deluge can be made out. The following are his views —“The evidence which I have collected in my Reliquiae Diluvianae, 1823, shows that one of the last great physical events that have affected the surface of our globe was a violent inundation which overwhelmed a great part of the northern hemisphere, and that this event was followed by the sudden disappearance of a large number of the species of terrestrial quadruVol. XI. No. 29.

1

In 1821, the attention of Dr. Buckland was called to the contents of a cavern in limestone, in Yorkshire, that had recently been opened and found to contain numerous peculiar bones. He found this cavern to contain on its floor the following substances. At the bottom was a coating of stalagmite, or concreted limestone, that had dripped from the roof; then succeeded a layer of mud, which contained, as did also the stalagmite beneath it, numerous fragments of the bones of animals, most of them extinct. Above the mud was a second layer of stalagmite, destitute of bones; and the cavern appeared to have been closed since the period when the mud was introduced ; the lower stalagmite having been deposited previous to that time, and the upper stalagmite subsequently. More than twenty species of animals were made out from these relics; and they were mostly tropical animals. From all the facts in the case, , which were examined with great care by Prof. Buckland, he made several very important inferences: First, that this cave peds, wbich had inhabited these regions in the period immediately preceding it. I also ventured to apply the name Diluvium, to the superficial beds of gravel, clay and sand which appear to have been produced by this great irruption of water. The description of the facts that form the evidence presented in this volume, is kept distinct from the question of the identity of the event attested by them, with any deluge recorded in history. Discoveries which have been made, since the publication of this work, show that many of the animals therein described, existed during more than one geological period preceding the catastrophe by which they were extirpated. Hence it seems more probable, that the event in question was the last of the many geological revolutions that have been produced by violent irruptions of water, rather than the comparatively tranquil inundation described in the Inspired Narrative. It has been justly argued, against the attempt to identify these two great bistorical and natural phenomena, that as the rise and fall of the waters of the Mosaic deluge are described to have been gradual, and of short duration, they would have produced comparatively little change on the surface of the country they overflowed. The large preponderance of extinct species among the animals we find in caves, and in superficial deposits of diluvium, and the new discovery of human bones along with them afford other strong reasons for referring these species to a period anterior to the creation of man. This important point however cannot be considered as completely settled, till more detailed investigations of the newest members of the Pliocene, and of the diluvial and alluvial formations shall bave taken place.” Bridgewater Trealise, p. 94, Note. London, 1836.

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