The American Journal of Science and Arts

Forsideomslag
S. Converse, 1858
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Populære passager

Side 431 - And the earth brought forth grass, and herb yielding seed after his kind, and the tree yielding fruit, whose seed was in itself, after his kind: and God saw that it was good.
Side 439 - ... gentle manner to introduce Luidia to the purer element. Whether the cold air was too much for him or the sight of the bucket too terrific I know not, but in a moment he proceeded to dissolve his corporation, and at every mesh of the dredge his fragments were seen escaping. In despair I grasped at the largest, and brought up the extremity of an arm with its terminating eye, the spinous eyelid of which opened and closed with something exceedingly like a wink of derision.
Side 289 - A panorama more deplorably desolate no human imagination can conceive. To the right and left, as far as the eye could reach, there lay outstretched, like ramparts of the world, lines of...
Side 438 - As it does not generally break up before it is raised above the surface of the sea, cautiously and anxiously I sank my bucket to a level with the dredge's mouth, and proceeded in the most gentle manner to introduce Luidia to the purer element. Whether the cold air was too much for him, or the sight of the bucket too terrific, I know not, but in a moment he proceeded to dissolve his corporation, and at every mesh of the dredge his fragments were seen escaping.
Side 422 - With these conditions of life, we know that life itself has been enjoyed throughout the same countless thousands of years ; and that with life, from the beginning, there has been death.
Side 413 - Handbook of the British Flora; a Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in, the British Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By GEORGE BENTHAM, FRS 5th Edition, revised by Sir JD HOOKEE, CB, KCSI, FRS, &c.
Side 404 - ... surface cannot afford warmth enough to keep the water liquid. " This effect is well seen by the instant freezing of a piece of ice to a worsted glove even when on a warm hand. But metals may act so, provided they are prevented from conveying heat by surrounding them with ice. Thus, as has been shown, metals adhere to melting ice.
Side 427 - In flowering plants it is conveyed by the pollen-tube, in animals and many ilowerlcss plants, by locomotive spermatozoids. The changes of form which the representative of a species undergoes in successive agamically propagating individuals are termed the " metagenesis " of such species. The changes of form which the representative of a species undergoes in a single individual, is called the "metamorphosis.
Side 432 - ... of any gradual diminution of the size of such species, but is the result of circumstances which may be illustrated by the fable of the ' Oak and the Reed ; ' the smaller and feebler animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes which have destroyed the larger species.

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