The Literary and Scientific Class Book: Embracing the Leading Facts and Principles of Science, Illustrated with Engravings, with Many Difficult Words Explained at the Heads of the Lessons, and Questions Annexed for Examination : Designed as Exercises for the Reading and Study of the Higher Classes in Common Schools : Selected from the Rev. John Platts' Literary and Scientific Class Book, and from Various Other Sources and Adapted to the Wants and Condition of Youth in the United States

Forsideomslag
J. and J.W. Prentiss, 1833 - 318 sider

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Indhold

Beauty and Sublimity Illustration of
16
Taste Improvement and Pleasures of
18
Poetry its Object
20
Advantages of Studying History
21
Philosophy its leading Offices
23
The Praise of Philosophy
25
General Properties of Bodies
27
Attraction of Gravitation Sir Isaac Newtons Dis coveries
30
Centre of Gravity Pyramids of Egypt Tower of Pisa
33
The Laws of Motion Velocity Momenta Action and Reaction
36
Compound Motion The Pendulum
37
Mechanical Powers The Lever
40
The Pulley Wheel and Axle and Inclined Plane
42
The Wedge and Screw Friction
44
The Laws of Fluids Pressure of Fluids
47
CONTENTS
50
Specific Gravity of Bodies Archimedes
51
Hydraulics Syphon Common Pump Forcing Pump
52
The Diving Bell and Steam Engine
54
Nature and Properties of Air The Air Pump
56
The Barometer Uses of
59
Bound Velocity of Sound Echo
61
Nature of Musical Sounds Musical Barometer
64
Lesson Pago 32 Different kinds of Lenses Burning Glass
69
Mirrors Convex Reflectors
71
Colours The Prism
73
The Rainbow Halo and Parhelia
75
Structure of the Eye Angle of Vision
78
Optical Instruments Spectacles Microscopes
81
Microscopic Discoveries
83
The Telescope and Telegraph
86
Astronomy Progress of this Science
88
The Solar System Galileo
91
The Sun a magnificent habitable globe o
93
Mercury and Venus
95
The Earth Ecliptic and Zodiac Celestial Lati tude and Longitude
97
Day and Night causes of
100
Changes of the Seasons
102
The Moon Harvest Moon
104
The Tides explanation of
107
Eclipses of the Moon and Sun
108
Mars Vesta Juno Pallas and Ceres
111
Jupiterhis Belts Satellites c
113
Saturn and Uranus Saturns Ring
114
Comets Pope Callixtus
115
The Fixed Stars The Milky Way 117 O 55 The Constellations Hymn to the North Star
119
Forms and Divisions of Time Equation of Time
122
The Planetary System
125
Oxyds and Combustion Exhilarating Gas 67 Electricity Electrical Machine Experiments
148
Thun der and Lightning
152
Magnetical Experiments Amusing Deceptions
164
Mineralogy Characters of Minerals
173
Copper and Lead Brass White Lead
180
Geology Stratification Sacred History confirmed
186
Study of Botany a Source of Mental Improve
194
Process of Vegetation
200
Classification of Vegetablesits Importance and Use
207
First Class of Animals Mammalia Orders of
213
Reptiles and Fishes Electrical Fishes
219
Orders of Insects The Gossamer
225
Lesson Page 101 Crustaceous and Molluscous Animals Shells
228
Vermes and Zoophytes Leech Polypes
230
Existence of the Deity
232
Political Economy Progress of Civilization
233
Property unequal Distribution of
235
Division of Labour
237
Agriculture the Strength of Nations
239
Commerce and Manufactures
240
Moneyits abundance not the cause but the con sequence of Wealth
242
Shipbuilding and Navigation
244
Architecture Advantages of Orders of
246
Constitution of the United States Sketch of
248
Excellence of our Republican Government
251
Intelligence of the People a Means of Safety to the Government
252
The government of England King Parliament
254
an Extract from Bryants Poem of the Ages
257
Structure of the Human Body
258
Structure of the Human Body continued
260
The Human Voice wonderful Mechanism of
262
Structure of the Ear
263
Music Pleasures of Ear for
265
Painting Cartoons of Raphael
269
Sculpture Statuary Casting in Plaster of Paris
270
The Love of Nature
271
The Importance of Natural Philosophy
272
Mythology
274
Account of the Principal Heathen Gods
275
Account of the Principal Heathen Goddesses
278
Harmony of Science and Christianity
280
The Influence of an Early Taste for Reading
281
The Mechanical Wonders of a Feather
282
Art of Making Pins
284
Clouds and Rain
285
Invention and Progress of Printing
287
Hope Influence of
288
Optics Reflection and Refraction of Light
295

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Side 272 - TO him who in the love of nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks A various language; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness, and a smile And eloquence of beauty, and she glides Into his darker musings, with a mild And healing sympathy, that steals away Their sharpness, ere he is aware.
Side 274 - THESE, as they change, ALMIGHTY FATHER, these Are but the varied God. The rolling year Is full of THEE. Forth in the pleasing Spring THY beauty walks, THY tenderness and love. Wide flush the fields ; the softening air is balm ; Echo the mountains round ; the forest smiles ; And every sense, and every heart is joy. Then comes THY glory in the Summer months, With light and heat refulgent. Then THY sun...
Side 251 - In forest, brake or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude ; Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and, knowing, dare maintain, Prevent the long-aimed blow, And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain ; These constitute a State; And sovereign law, that State's collected will, O'er thrones and globes elate Sits empress, crowning good, repressing ill.
Side 251 - What Constitutes a State? WHAT constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate — Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned — Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride — Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No; men, high-minded men...
Side 75 - TRIUMPHAL arch, that fill'st the sky When storms prepare to part, I ask not proud Philosophy To teach me what thou art — Still seem as to my childhood's sight, A midway station given For happy spirits to alight Betwixt the earth and heaven.
Side 122 - ... gaze, And steers, undoubting, to the friendly coast ; And they who stray in perilous wastes, by night, Are glad when thou dost shine to guide their footsteps right. And, therefore, bards of old, Sages, and hermits of the solemn wood, Did in thy beams behold A beauteous type of that unchanging good, That bright eternal beacon, by whose ray The voyager of time should shape his heedful way.
Side 20 - The world is full of poetry — the air Is living with its spirit ; and the waves Dance to the music of its melodies, And sparkle in its brightness. Earth is veiled, And mantled with its beauty; and the walls That close the universe with crystal in, Are eloquent with voices, that proclaim The unseen glories of immensity, In harmonies, too perfect, and too high, For aught but beings of celestial mould, And speak to man in one eternal hymn, Unfading beauty, and unyielding power.
Side 93 - As home he goes beneath the joyous moon. Ye that keep watch in heaven, as earth asleep Unconscious lies, effuse your mildest beams, Ye constellations, while your angels strike, Amid the spangled sky, the silver lyre. Great source of day ! best image here below Of thy Creator, ever pouring wide, From world to world, the vital ocean round, On nature write with every beam His praise.
Side 121 - Her constellations come, and climb the heavens, and go. Day, too, hath many a star To grace his gorgeous reign, as bright as they: Through the blue fields afar, Unseen, they follow in his flaming way : Many a bright lingerer, as the eve grows dim, Tells what a radiant troop arose and set with him. And thou dost see them rise, Star of the Pole ! and thou dost see them set. Alone, in thy cold skies, Thou keep 'st thy old unmoving station yet, Nor join'st the dances of that glittering train, Nor dipp'st...

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