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made and carefully kept, they can contain the mere proceedings only of the associations, or individuals, to which they relate. Such proceedings seldom let us into the minutiæ which move the springs of human society; and hence are but very imperfect guides to one who describes the past for the benefit of the future.—To supply this want, I would propose the following method, to be observed as circumstances may require, for preserving an account of the current events of the times.

Let some suitable individual in every town, be requested, at the close of every year, to compile an annual retrospect of the events that have taken place during the past year. This might be easily done by his keeping a memorandum book, in which the events, as they from time to time occur, shall be recorded, classified under appropriate beads or subjects. Where a Lyceum or other similar association exists, it might be appropriately assigned to one of the members; in other cases to a professional or other intelligent gentleman; or it might be undertaken voluntarily and privately. The objects of notice and enquiry to such an individual might embrace the following and perhaps other particulars.

1.-The names of town officers, and individuals in town who hold offices in the county, state, or elsewhere, with the date of their election or appointment; and the principles in the policy of the town, state or nation, which influenced their election or appointment.

2.-The names and occupation of those who have commenced or discontinued business as professional men, merchants, mechanics, manufacturers, innholders, &c. and the date of such change. The introduction of new, and the removal of old inhabitants, specifying their location, name, and date.

3.-New dwelling houses erected, and by whom, and old ones demolished, and the location of each.

4.-—The changes which have taken place in the owners of real estate, especially dwelling, and other important houses, exhibiting the names of the parties, the date of transfer, and price; and the variation in value generally of such property.

5.-Uncommon proceedings of the town, their origin, nature, and effects.

6.-An account of the nature and effect among the people of the methods of supporting schools, the poor, the roads, and other corporate affairs of the town.--The number of legal voters, polls, poor, the amount of valuation, and taxes; and statistical views of specific appropriations to different objects, exhibiting the increase or diminution.

7.--The state of the common schools, division of public money among the several districts; names and compensation of teachers, male and female, time kept, number of scholars, ages, books, progress of improvement, &c.; the same of the academies, private schools, and sabbath schools.

8.-Notices of graduates of the different colleges belonging to the town.

9.-The formation and history of Lyceums, and other associations for mutual improvement, for temperance, charity, freemasonry, religion, &c.

10.-State and progress of public libraries, with notices of additions.

11.-Military companies, names of officers, date of commission or discharge, number of men enrolled in each, and state of public opinion in regard to the militia.

12.—The invention, or introduction of new machinery or improvements in agriculture, or the mechanic arts; the effect they produce; and the discontinuance of any in present use; specifying what they are and by whom made, and the amount and value of different articles manufactured.

Allen and Nickerson were laborers, in the cmploy of Mr. Willey, the former of whom left four orphan children, pennyless to the charities of the world. Both were from the town of Bartlett.

Great numbers visited the scene of destruction during the days following the discovery of the three bodies, searching for the remainder; and three others were afterwards found.

In attempting this account, the writer feels his utter inability to describe the variety and extent of the destruction. To form a correct idea of the out-pouring torrents, the reader must have been in the midst ; he must have been at the foot of the mountains—watched the movements of the clouds, and listened to the hollow winds, as their echoes, reverberating among the hills, rolled away like distant thunders ; he must have travelled over the immense masses which rolled down like the eruptions of a volcano,—the rocks, the trees, the streams, removed from their former beds, and the deep channels cut among the rocks for new rivers bursting out of the sides of the mountains; he must have visited the little cottage, standing alone in the path of the deluge, which, as if unwilling to destroy, parted in its rear, and leaving it untouched, closed again before it! Having done so, he may conceive a scene, that we are unable to describe, though its impressions will not soon be forgotten.

A great amount of property was destroyed in all the towns situated at the foot of the mountains, and indeed in many other sections of the country. But the unparalleled severity of the storm here, and the melancholy catastrophe attending it, will long be noted in the history of our State.

A PLAN FOR PROVIDING MATERIALS FOR

HISTORY.

[Communicated for Publication.]

One of the greatest difficulties to a historian is to carry himself back to the times whose events he describes, and make himself, in imagination at least, a cotemporary with the feelings, the prejudices, the manners and customs, and the whole circumstances of the society which then existed. Unless he does this, he cannot accurately portray those strong points in the changes of human affairs, which make up the beginnings of great revolutions in thought, customs, improvements, and progress in societies, communities and nations. This is properly the province of the general historian, who deduces the philosophy of history from facts, and exhibits their relative importance in the changes of the world. But to such a historian, minute facts are absolutely necessary to accuracy in his inferences and conclusions. Such facts, however, it must be confessed, are but partially to be obtained by any one who attempts the history of the past ages of our country. How often little incidents, originating even in a comparatively obscure village or country town, and not considered, at the time, of great relative importance, have been the beginning of some inighty change, affecting the politics, the religion, or the improvements of a state, a nation, or the world. But for want of some one to give a faithful description of them at the time, the truth goes down to posterity enveloped in obscurity and error. The records of towns, societies, and individuals, are often very imperfectly kept ; and when kept, are exposed to destruction by the carelessness of officers, through whose hands they successively pass ; and the unforeseen and unavoidable accidents of life. And, indeed, when such records are accurately

made and carefully kept, they can contain the mere proceedings only of the associations, or individuals, to which they relate. Such proceedings seldom let us into the minutia which move he springs of human society; and hence are but very imperfect guides to one who describes the past for the benefit of the future. To supply this want, I would propose the following method, to be observe ed as circumstances may require, for preserving an account of the current events of the times.

Let some suitable individual in every town, be requested, at the close of every year, to compile an annual retrospect of the events that have taken place during the past year. This might be easily done by his keeping a memorandum book, in which the events, as they from time to time occur, shall be recorded, classified under appropriate heads or subjects. Where a Lyceum or other similar association exists, it might be appropriately assigned to one of the members; in other cases to a professional or other intelligent gentleman; or it might be undertaken voluntarily and privately. The objects of notice and enquiry to such an individual might embrace the following and perhaps other particulars.

1.—The names of town officers, and individuals in town who hold offices in the county, state, or elsewhere, with the date of their election or appointment; and the principles in the policy of the town, state or nation, which influenced their election or appointment.

2.-The names and occupation of those who have commenced or discontinued business as professional men, merchants, mechanics, manufacturers, innholders, &c. and the date of such change. The introduction of new, and the removal of old inhabitants, specifying their location, name, and date.

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