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sign of the British was probably to bring on an action with Commodore M’Donough's squadron, some distance up that Creek. No soldier has ever been wounded or lost in battle from this town.

Warner is divided into twenty-one school districts for primary schools, for the most part comfortably provided with school houses ; in which are taught reading, writing, arithmetic, English grammar, geography generally, and in some, rhetoric, history, philosophy, chemistry, &c.

The town is well watered by Warner river and its tributaries. This is a small river of from twelve to twenty yards in width, which rises in New-London and Fishersfield, enters at the north west corner of the town, and runs diagonally through the town to the south-east corner, and falls into the Contoocook river in Hopkinton, about a mile beyond the limits of the town. This stream divides the town pretty nearly into two equal parts, and affords several valuable mill -privileges. There are six grist-mills in town, two with three, and the remainder with two runs of stones each. Also, one paper-mill, two clothing mills, and twelve saw-mills. There are four ponds, Thom Pond, Pleasant, Bear, and Bagley's, which afford a variety of small fish. In certain seasons of the year the salmon trout is caught in Bear Pond, of a good size and very fine flavor. Pleasant Pond contains perhaps 15 or 20 acres. It has apparently no natural channel for an inlet or outlet to it; but is probably supplied through subterranean passages, which raise the water at times, without any apparent cause, sufficiently high to overflow its banks.

Mountains. Warner has a full share of mountains and high bluffs within its limits. Kearsarge mountain, on the north, rears his majestic head from the bosom of a dense forest of evergreens.

This mountain, which is estimated at 2461 feet in height, is not excelled in beauty of form, from a southern or eastern view, by any in this part of the country. It is frequently visited by the lovers of nature's rude and majestic scenery.

It is easy of access by the new road from Warner to Suiton, and round the north part of the mountain in Wilmot and Andover, where people can ride comfortably to within a mile of the top of the highest peak. From this bluff, the spectator may, by a glance of the eye, bring to view nearly all of Merrimack county, and parts of Hillsborough, Rockingham, Strafford, Grafton, Sullivan, and Cheshire counties. The Mink Ilills are a range of low mountains, extending from the river to the south part of the town, a little west of a centre line. The farms in the neighborhood of these mountains are valuable for grazing, and afford good orcharding.

The principal timber trees of our forests are pine, several species, oak, white and red, maple, birch, beach, chesnut, ash, hemlock, spruce, bass, &c. Pine and oak were found in the greatest abundance and of the best quality. So insensible were the first settlers to the value of timber, that thousands and thousands of dollars worth of the finest timber trees were destroyed by fires, and others wantonly cut down, and left to perish upon the ground. Many samples of this waste may be seen at the present day. Great quantities of excellent clear boards have been sawed at the several mills in town. The white oak also has been found in considerable quantities, and of an excellent quality. Our navy yard has been furnished with several very fine keel sticks for seventy four gun ships, from this and the adjoining town of Hopkinton. Timber, however, is now becoming scarce.

Warner may be considered strictly a farming town. Beef, pork, butter, cheese, mutton, poul

try and some wool, are the principal articles raised for the market. Corn, rye, wheat, oats, peas, beans, potatoes, turnips, and most garden vegetables are raised for home consumption. There is generally a very considerable deficiency in bread stuffs. Hay of a good quality is cut upon the upland farms, consisting of clover, herdsgrass, redtop, &c. and in the intervals and meadows, foulmeadow, bluejoint and several other kinds of grasses. Apples are raised in great abundance, but little attention has as yet been paid by farmers to the improvement of their quality by grafts. Pears, peaches, cherries and most kinds of stone fruits may be easily raised here to great perfection. Melons, squashes and pompions flourish well. Flax was raised formerly for home use, but latterly cotton cloths supersede linens, and the raising of it is almost entirely neglected.

On the general scale, we may consider genius, not altogether as an exotic, but a native plant, common to all the human family, not confined to any locality, nor such a faculty as will vegetate and grow luxuriantly without care and cultivation. And the stinted growth of it here, is not so much attributable to any natural deficiency,as to a culpable neglect of literary, and scientific pursuits.

The physicians who have been in practice any considerable time in town are the following, viz. Doctor John Hall was the first, and is now living in Maine, *John Currier, - Cogswell, *Thomas Webster, *William Dinsmoor, *Henry Lyman, Silas Walker, the writer of these sketches, *Caleb Buswell, and Leonard Eaton. They are inserted in the order in which they came into town and commenced business. There are two Attorneys in town, the only two who have ever resided long in the place; Henry B. Chase and HARRI

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SON G. HARRIS, Esquires. There are three stores and two taverns in town.

A town Lyceum was formed in June, 1830, which will it is hoped exert an influence in favour of mental improvement, the great object for which it is formed.

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The following Table, which was taken from the records of Richard Bartlett, Esq. will show the important information of the opening of Spring on the hills in Warner ; the pine lands are ready for the plough usually at least a week or ten days earlier ; this indicates the near close of foddering time of young cattle and sheep. In 1801 Ploughed March 28. Sowed wheat April 5. 1802 do. April 14.

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19. 1803 do. do. 11.

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18. 1805 do. do. 1.

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6. 1806 do. do. 21.

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26. 1807 do. do. 25.

do. May 4. 1808 do. do. 11.

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April 15. 1809 do. do. 18.

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22. 1810 do. 20.

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24. 1811 do. do. 4.

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8. 1812 do. do. 21.

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29. 1813 do. do. 19.

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23. 1814 do. do. 12.

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16. 1815 do. 19.

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29. 1816

do.
do. 20.

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26. 1817

do.
do. 15.

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23. 1818 do. May 2.

do. May 9.

very good crop. 1819 do. April 23.

do. April 27 1820 do. do. 22.

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27. 1821 do. do. 17.

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24. 1822 do. do. 9.

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18. 1823 do. do. 17.

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23. 1824 do. do. 10.

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18. 1825 do. do. 11.

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16. 1826

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do. 16.

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24. 1827 do. do, 16.

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21. 1828 do. March 31.

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12. 1829 do. April 17.

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27. 1830 do. do. 9.

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15. 1831 do. do. 2.

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26.

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BILL OF MORTALITY, IN WARNER, KEPT BY MRS. BENJAMIN

EVANS.

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Memoir of Rev. Federal Burt, of Durham, a

member of the Society. [From the Sermon delivered at his funeral by Rev. Jonathan French, of North-Hamp

ton, with some alterations.] The Rev. FEDERAL BURT was born in Southampton, Massachusetts, on the 4th day of March, 1789, being the memorable day on which the Federal Constitution first went into operation : from that circumstance, his father, who was warmly in favor of the Constitution, gave that name to his son.

Mr. Burt was one of eleven children. The names of the ten eldest were enrolled among the professed disciples of the Lord Jesus, before the death of their lamented brother.

This fact may encourage the faith of christian parents in the covenanted mercies of their God: and excite them to fidelity in religiously instructing their children, and to earnest prayer for their conversion.

It was Mr. Burt's privilege to be born in a place distinguished for the zeal with which the literary and religious education of young men has been promoted. In the course of twenty-five years, previous to August, 1826, twenty-eight young men, in that town, had received a collegiate education : nineteen of whom were ordained minis

* Mrs. Susanna Stuart, an unmarried woman, aged 96 years, and Mrs. Foster,

92 years.

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