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came into his head how he would prevent the paper from telling of him, and having found a large stone he put the letter under it, and went at some distance, eat several of the oranges, and then took up the letter and went forward, thinking himself secure from being discovered; but when he came to deliver the letter and the present, the lady found several of the oranges wanting, asked the Indian what was become of them? He stood in it stiffly, that he had delivered all that was sent by him ; but the lady told him, the letter informed her that there was more sent than he had brought ; at which he seemed very angry, and desired the lady would not believe the letter, for it lied. The Indian was soon' made to understand, that he should be punished for his offence; but having begged forgiveness, and promised never to be guilty of the like again, he was pardoned.

A third story is told of the Governour and an Indian, which may not be improper to shew the subtlety of the Natives. Governour Dudley was a man of very good understanding and was very industrious in improving his plantation: he observing a lusty Indian almost naked, took occasion one day to ask him, why he did not work to purchase something to keep him from the cold? The fellow asked the Governour, why he did not work? who told him he worked with his head, and had no occasion to work with his hands as he must. The Indian said if any one would employ him he would work: the Governour asked him to kill him a calf, for which he would give him a shilling. The Indian readily undertook it, and killed the calf; but observing he did not go about to skin it, asked him why he did not make haste to skin and dress it? The Indian answered, No, no, Coponoh ; that was not in my bargain, I was to have a shilling for killing it, he no dead Coponoh. The Governor seeing the fellow witty upon him

bid hiin dress it, and he would give him another shilling: The Indian having finished his work, and being paid, went to an Alehonse, where they sold rum, which was near the Governor's house, where he spent some of his money in that liquor, which they are all great lovers of; and whether he had brass money of his own, or whether the house furnished him with it, is out of my story; but he went back to the Governor and told him, he had given him bad money, who seeing it brass, readily gave him another; soon after the fellow went back with a second, which the governor also changed, but knew the fellow had put them upon him, and seeing him next day, called to him and told him he must carry a letter presently to Boston, which he wrote to the keeper of Bridewell, in order to have the fellow well lashed; but he apprehending the consequence, and seeing another Indian in the road, he gave him the letter, tel. ling him, the governour said he must carry that letter presently to Boston. "The poor fellow took the letter innocently, and having delivered the letter as directed, was whipped very severely; the governour soon after seeing the Indian again, asked him if he had carried the letter he sent him with? He answered, No, no, Coponoh, Headwork, pointing to his head. The governour was so well pleased with the fellow's answer, he for

gave him.

*Perhaps this is the truth of a story which is said to have happened in Boston with iwo negroes, and which has been circulated in almost every newspaper and magazine in the country, in some of which, however, it was barilly cognizable, being but a shadow of it, and as seen at a great distance .

Instances of Longevity in Canterbury, N. H.

John M'Crillis, died November 3, 1793, aged 90.—His wife, Margaret M'Crillis, died in 1808, at the

age

of 92. Abigail Sanborn, a member of the society of Shakers, died in January, 1805, at the age of 101. She was a native of Kingston, N. H.

Benjamin Jackson, died in October, 1812, aged 96. He was born in Durham, N. H. Oct. 1719, and settled at Canterbury in 1782.

Eunice Whidden, aged 99 years, 6 months, died in November, 1812. Her husband, Mr. W. died at the age of 86.

Ebenezer Currier, died July, 1814, aged 93 years, 9 months,

Joshua Boynton, died October, 1814, aged 91 years. He was a native of Kingston.

John Ingalls, died March, 1815, aged 93. He was a native of Atkinson, had 20 children by two wives, all of whom lived to exceed the age of 30.

Deborah, a black woman, servant in the family of Jonathan Ayres, Esq. died in February, 1816, at the age of 102. She had 14 children.

Mary Currier, died Nov. 1817, aged 94.

John Huntoon, died Nov. 1820, aged 92. He was from Kingston—was a soldier in 1746–7, and stationed at the garrison in Canterbury.

Isaac Small, died in October, 1821, aged 100 years, 5 months, 25 days. He was born at Cape Cod, 1721.

Hannah Small, died in 1822, at the age of 101 years, 9 months. She was the wife of Isaac Small, with whom she married in 1758.

Hannah Snell, died in 1822, aged 92.
William Rines, died January 2, 1823, aged 95.

bid hiin dress it, and he would give him another shilling: The Indian having finished his work, and being paid, went to an Alehonse, where they sold rum, which was near the Governor's house, where he spent some of his money in that liquor, which they are all great lovers of; and whether he had brass money of his own, or whether the house furnished him with it, is out of my story; but he went back to the Governor and told him, he had given him bad money, who seeing it brass, readily gave him another; soon after the fellow went back with a second, which the governor also changed, but knew the fellow had put them upon him, and seeing him next day, called to him and told him he must carry a letter presently to Boston, which he wrote to the keeper of Bridewell, in order to have the fellow well lashed; but he apprehending the consequence, and seeing another Indian in the road, he gave him the letter, telling him, the governour said he must carry that letter presently to Boston. The poor fellow took the letter innocently, and having delivered the letter as directed, was whipped very severely ; * the governour soon after seeing the Indian again, asked him if he had carried the letter he sent him with? He answered, No, no, Coponoh, Headwork, pointing to his head. The governour was so well pleased with the fellow's answer, he for

gave him

*Perhaps this is the truth of a story which is said to have happened in Boston with two negroes,

and which has been circulated in almost every newspaper and magazine in the country, in suine of which, however, it was barilly cognizabıle, being but a shadow of it, and as seen at a great distance.

Instances of Longevity in Canterbury, N. H.

John M'Crillis, died November 3, 1793, aged 90.-His wife, Margaret M'Crillis, died in 1808, at the age of 92.

Abigail Sanborn, a member of the society of Shakers, died in January, 1805, at the age of 101. She was a native of Kingston, N. H.

Benjamin Jackson, died in October, 1812, aged 96. He was born in Durham, N. H. Oct. 1719, and settled at Canterbury in 1782.

Eunice Whidden, aged 99 years, 6 months, died in November, 1812 Her husband, Mr. W. died at the age of 86.

Ebenezer Currier, died July, 1814, aged 93 years, 9 months,

Joshua Boynton, died October, 1814, aged 91 years.

He was a native of Kingston. John Ingalls, died March, 1815, aged 93. He was a native of Atkinson, had 20 children by two wives, all of whom lived to exceed the age of 30.

Deborah, a black woman, servant in the family of Jonathan Ayres, Esq. died in February, 1816, at the age of 102. She had 14 children.

Mary Currier, died Nov. 1817, aged 94.

John Huntoon, died Nov. 1820, aged 92. He was from Kingston—was a soldier in 1746-7, and stationed at the garrison in Canterbury.

Isaac Small, died in October, 1821, aged 100 years, 5 months, 25 days. He was born at Cape Cod, 1721.

Hannah Small, died in 1822, at the age of 101 years, 9 months. She was the wife of Isaac Small, with whom she married in 1758.

Hannah Snell, died in 1822, aged 92.
William Rines, died January 2, 1823, aged 95.

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