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THE FAITH

ONCE

DELIVERED TO THE SAINTS.

THIRD EDITION.

PRINTED FOR THE

American Unitarian Association.

BOSTON, BOWLES AND DEARBORN, 72 WASHINGTON STREET.

Price 4 Cents.

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THE FAITH

ONCE

DELIVERED TO THE SAINTS.

As the Apostle Jude has declared it to be a duty of Christians, to contend earnestly for the faith once delivered to the saints ; it becomes us to understand what that faith is, and to consider whether we are doing our duty in this particular. To aid us in this is the design of the following pages.

By the faith once delivered to the saints, we understand the Christian Religion ;—those truths which were taught by our blessed Saviour for the instruction, the regeneration, and the salvation of man. If it be inquired what these truths are, we should say they seem to be mainly and chiefly comprised in the following summary.

That there is one Infinite and Eternal Being, the source of all existence, the author of all blessing, the ruler of all worlds, who exercises an unreserved and impartial sovereignty over all beings and events :

That this God is one only, without equal, rival, or partner :

That this Being, infinitely perfect in his moral attributes, maintains a moral government over his creatures,

the end of which is the promotion of the greatest virtue and the greatest happiness.

That man is the subject of this moral government, beneath which he is treated as a free moral agent, capable of choosing between right and wrong, and accountable for his choice :

That in this world he is placed in a state of trial and probation, for the purpose of forming and bringing out his character, in preparation for a final allotment of condition in conformity with his character:

That into this state of preparatory discipline he comes, not with a character already fixed, but with certain rational faculties and moral capacities, in themselves neither good nor evil; that he himself on entering life is neither virtuous nor vicious, neither holy nor sinful; neither an object of praise nor of blame; but possesses such powers as when developed will render him one or the other, according to the objects to which they become attached and the habits which they form:

These powers are Reason and Conscience—which approve and lead to goodness; and the Passions and Appetites—which, being connected with sensual objects and present gratifications, incline to self-indulgence and sin :

That man's trial consists principally in the struggle for mastery between these two parts of his constitution, (in the language of scripture, the law in the members and the law in the mind-the flesh and the spirit) and its object is to exalt and purify his spiritual nature, and deliver it from subjection to the sensual :

That in order to aid man in this great struggle-to which from natural infirmities and strong temptations, he was so often found unequal-it pleased God to commission his son Jesus Christ, to communicate all the know,

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