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we profess ourselves, is that good Shepherd, who laid down his life for his sheep. We, with our fellow christians, delight to cherish his remembrance; we pray that nothing may have power to separate us from his love; our warmest hope is, that we may be found worthy to be with him where he is, and to behold his glory; we look and long for his salvation; we implore every spiritual blessing through his name; and through him, the beloved Son of the Father, we ascribe to God, only wise and good, most high, most holy, and most merciful, supreme over all, even to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, everlasting praises.

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RELIGIOUS PHRASEOLOGY.

THIRD EDITION.

PRINTED FOR THE

American Unitarian Association.

BOSTON,

BOWLES AND DEARBORN, 72 WASHINGTON STREET.

Price 5 Cents.

BOSTON,

Isaac R. Butts and Co. Printers.

ON

RELIGIOUS PHRASEOLOGY.

CONSISTING OF

AN EXPLANATION OF SOME OF THE MOST COMMON TERMS AND PHRASES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT, TOGETHER WITH SOME REMARKS ON THE POPULAR AND TECHNICAL RELIGIOUS PHRASEOLOGY OF THE PRESENT DAY.

It is not intended to give an air of paradox, to what is believed to be a sober truth, when we say, that there is no book so much read, and so little understood as the Bible. And we may add, that there is no subject—no abstract subject, at least, so much thought of, and as an abstract subject, so little comprehended, as religion. It is as certain, as it is unfortunate, that on the principles of religion, there are more vague terms and vague ideas abroad in the world, than on any other.

This deficiency of clear views, about the terms and ideas that belong to religion, might be made obvious in many ways. Let any one after he has conversed on religious topics, or after praying, let him pause, and recall the expressions he has used, and endeavour to attach a precise meaning to them, and he will find it to be far more difficult than at first he may be ready to imagine

Or, let any one read a chapter in the New Testament, (and he may take the simplest part of it)-let him undertake to affix a definite sense to every phrase and word he meets with, and he will probably be surprised at the difficulty of the process. Or if you attend to the thoughts of other men, you may find the same deficiency. You may put to silence almost any fluent talker upon religion, by the simple question, "understandest thou what thou sayest?" And it is a question too, which may often disturb the most discriminating in their views, and the most guarded in their language. Indeed, the hardest question, in all moral and religious speculations is, "what do you mean?" and had it been sufficiently attended to, would have put an end to a thousand other questions.

This vagueness in the ideas of men is also perfectly manifest from the endless disputes that have prevailed among them. How many huge volumes of controversial theology would have been reduced to a few scanty sheets, if men had understood either their antagonists or themselves.

Besides, it is to be observed that the imperfection of our moral and religious notions consists essentially in the vagueness of our conceptions. The deficiency is not a want of ideas, but a want of discrimination concerning them. The elements of moral science and of religious truth, are, either, within ourselves, or in the record which God has given us of them. This truth-this science, is founded on human nature and on divine revelation. Of the feelings of our nature we are conscious;—and what is needed is only to distinguish them. In other words, the elements of moral science are not to be yet created, but to be reduced to order, and illuminated by clearer per

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