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velled at the scene which met you—a soldier not only calm amid hospital horrors, but pointing the dying to the only Saviour, bidding them “keep the crimson cross full in view." You have been astonished, as fresh incidents in his self-denying life testified to the reality of his religion. You might have

“the memorable guard-room," and where oaths and profanity were once fearfully common, have heard “the rustling of tracts,” and the words of life, and the voice of prayer. You have marked the blaze of the watch-fire light up the sacred page; and, though howling winds in stormy gusts assailed the lowly tent, you have heard, above all, converse of man with man, such as you could not understand, for it was “in heaven." Lastly, you have shuddered at the final tragedy, and marvelled at the man who could glory in the immediate prospect of death! I will tell you of something far more wonderful, far more unaccountable, far more terrible than anything which has as yet arrested you. Listen! In one short half-hour, perhaps in less, the remembrance of the fearful truths of death and eternity will have vanished, I fear, from your mind; all better feelings which may have arisen will be stifled; you will forget the Christian in the soldier—the man of God in the model of humanity; and all the effect produced, by the life of this servant of Christ, will be powerless. Powerless, did I say? Alas! sinner, would that it did not embitter the dregs of your cup! But it will! It will double your guilt before God that you have slighted his Spirit, speaking through the life of his servant—that you reject Him and the blood of His Son—that for “ morsel of meat," one moment of earth, you are mad enough to sell your heavenly birthright," and for one hour of the pleasures of sin” to barter your never-dying soul ! Awful delusion ! Reader, call not this interference. Can I see you going down quick into hell, and not warn you? I cannot ! God in his mercy awaken you, or you are lost! Rouse yourself and cry mightily to Him!

But now ! Still may the door of mercy stand open!

Still may the blood of the Lamb wash you! Still

may the Spirit of truth sanctify you ! But cry now! So death, whenever it comes, wherever it strikes you—in the house, in the fight, in the fieldmay but set free the waiting spirit and speed you to your rest !

опе

J. F. SHAW, BOOKSELLER, SOUTHAMPTON ROW, AND

PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON; AND W. INNES, BOOKSELLER, SOUTH HANOVER STREET, EDINBURGH.

J. & W. RIDKR, Printers, 14, Bartholomew Close, London.

ease.

SCARCELY anything is more obvious, or the subject of more frequent remark, than the intensity of men's desire for gain. Wealth is regarded by multitudes as the supreme good, for the attainment of which they are willing to endure all imaginable toil, and to make the greatest sacrifices of convenience and

Too frequently its pursuit is permitted to absorb the mind to such a degree, that the claims of duty are slighted, salvation is neglected, and the soul is left to perish.

Our Lord observed this tendency in his own day, and knew that it would be the tendency of men in every age. He therefore, on one occasion, placed in the balance a soul and a world, and supposing a man to acquire the whole world—a thing absolutely impossible—he asked, what better he would be if his soul were lost:-“ WHAT SHALL IT PROFIT A MAN, IF HE SHALL GAIN THE WHOLE WORLD, AND LOSE HIS OWN SOUL ?”.

The first thing which this solemn question implies is, that the soul is of unspeakable worth. That must be inconceivably precious for which the whole world can furnish no equivalent. A few considerations may serve to illustrate this momentous truth.

Think of its vast capabilities of enjoyment. It is capable of three kinds of enjoyment—the intellectual, the emotional, and the religious. Formed in the image of its Maker, it is capable of knowledge, and reason, and thought. Communicating with the external world by means of the senses, it can secure an extensive acquaintance with the works of God. It can count the stars which bespangle the firmament, can estimate their distances and their magnitude, and can ascertain the laws by which the regularity and harmony of their revolutions are maintained; it can make itself acquainted with the various forms of sentient and vegetable existence which exist on this globe of ours; it can descend into the bowels of the earth, and read in successive strata the history of changes successively undergone; it can ponder the records of the past, and derive from them instruction and delight; and, besides, it can elaborate for itself mighty thoughts, the product of comparison and reflection, and revel in the beautiful creations of imagination and fancy. Then, too, the soul is

able joy

capable of affection ; and who has not felt the happiness which springs from pure and rightly regulated love ? Besides, it is capable of religion. It is in that service, indeed, that both its intellectual powers and its affections were intended to find their highest exercise, and therefore it is from religion that there proceeds the highest enjoyment. No language can describe the present happiness which springs from that source. But it is revealed in the word of God, that beyond the present and the earthly there is a world where the facilities of happiness will be inconceivably enlarged; where knowledge will be perfect; where the affections will be all centred on what is truly worthy; whilst religion, including alike love, contemplation, obedience, worship, will be the grand employment of all, and the spring of continual progress and unutter

What a precious thing that soul must be which is endowed with such capabilities, and for which there is provided a sphere in which those capabilities will find such full and perfect exercise !

But whilst it is susceptible of so large a measure of enjoyment, it is, on the other hand, susceptible of a large amount of misery. So intolerable have men felt the pressure of mental suffering, that, in some cases, reason has been dethroned; whilst, in others, rather than endure it, they have rushed unbidden into the presence of their Judge. “ The spirit of a man will sustain his infirmity, but a wounded spirit who can bear ?” And who can conceive the anguish of the spirit when it is not only wounded by remorse, but also exposed to the direct and terrible visitations of the wrath of God ?

And then the soul is immortal. We need not insist, in proof of the soul's immortality, on the argument from analogy, though the fact that nothing material is, properly speaking, destroyed, furnishes a strong presumption that the thinking spirit will survive the dissolution of the bodily frame; nor do we dwell on the fact that the persuasion has been cherished by almost every nation, and throughout all time ;-we come at once to the Bible. It is unquestionably the doctrine of revelation, that, for weal or woe, the soul must live for ever. The doctrine is not so much affirmed, as implied. It is blended with the promises of future blessedness and the threatenings of future woe. Both are alike declared to be, in every case, everlasting, and of course the inference of the soul's immortality is irresistible. Now it is its immortality, taken in connection with its capabilities of enjoyment, that especially stamps its worth. It would be unspeakably precious if it were to live only for a few brief ages, and then to sink into

than man,

annihilation ; but how inconceivably is its worth enhanced when we know that it will exist for ever!

Our estimate of the value of anything is materially affected by the manner in which others regard it, on whose judgment we rely. Many people prize that of which they themselves feel scarcely competent to form an opinion, because others, who are qualified to do so, pronounce it valuable. The precious diamond is prized because some skilful lapidary has declared it to be a gem of the first water. It is no uncommon thing to hear of the man of wealth filling his gallery with paintings, on which he has expended a princely fortune, almost entirely on the recommendation of some friend whom he knows to be a man of correct taste. Now the worth of the soul is a subject on which we are all competent to form an opinion; but still it may be instructive, and may be the means of confirming right determinations, to know what has been thought of its value by the highest authorities that have ever pronounced upon it. What is it which has been the great object of personal solicitude to the best of men ? and what is it which they have sought with the greatest anxiety on behalf of those in whom they were most deeply interested ?— The salvation of the soul ! There are beings of a higher order

endowed with nobler faculties, and commanding a far wider sphere of observation-beings who know what a blessed thing it is to be holy-and they are deeply interested in what concerns the welfare of frail, sinful men, and rejoice in the promotion of their true happiness. And what is it which causes them joy ? They see a man rising from poverty to affluence; but they do not rejoice over that, for they know that the tendency of worldly prosperity is too often to withdraw the heart from the only source of true peace, and to “ drown' the soul “in destruction and perdition.” They see the victor returning from the field of fight, crowned with the fairest laurels; but they know too well the fickleness of the popular breath, and the sufferings and the blood by which his victories have been purchased, to rejoice over that. But when they see a poor prodigal, seeking, in the spirit of heart-broken penitence, some place of repentance, to weep there, forsaking his sins, and returning to God, it is then that they rejoice. 6. There is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth ;” and over such a repentant sinner they watch, as ministering spirits, till his salvation is complete in heaven. What a proof of the estimate they have formed of the value of the soul ! There is one higher than they, who himself not only taught men the preciousness of the soul, but laid aside able joy

capable of affection ; and who has not felt the happiness which springs from pure and rightly regulated love ? Besides, it is capable of religion. It is in that service, indeed, that both its intellectual powers and its affections were intended to find their highest exercise, and therefore it is from religion that there proceeds the highest enjoyment. No language can describe the present happiness which springs from that source. But it is revealed in the word of God, that beyond the present and the earthly there is a world where the facilities of happiness will be inconceivably enlarged; where knowledge will be perfect; where the affections will be all centred on what is truly worthy; whilst religion, including alike love, contemplation, obedience, worship, will be the grand employment of all, and the spring of continual progress and unutter

What a precious thing that soul must be which is endowed with such capabilities, and for which there is provided a sphere in which those capabilities will find such full and perfect exercise !

But whilst it is susceptible of so large a measure of enjoyment, it is, on the other hand, susceptible of a large amount of misery. So intolerable have men felt the pressure of mental suffering, that, in some cases, reason has been dethroned; whilst, in others, rather than endure it, they have rushed unbidden into the presence of their Judge. “ The spirit of a man will sustain his infirmity, but a wounded spirit who can bear ?” And who can conceive the anguish of the spirit when it is not only wounded by remorse, but also exposed to the direct and terrible visitations of the wrath of God?

And then the soul is immortal. We need not insist, in proof of the soul's immortality, on the argument from analogy, though the fact that nothing material is, properly speaking, destroyed, furnishes a strong presumption that the thinking spirit will survive the dissolution of the bodily frame; nor do we dwell on the fact that the persuasion has been cherished by almost every nation, and throughout all time ;-we come at once to the Bible. It is unquestionably the doctrine of revela- : tion, that, for weal or woe, the soul must live for ever. The doctrine is not so much affirmed, as implied. It is blended with the promises of future blessedness and the threatenings of future woe. Both are alike declared to be, in every case, everlasting, and of course the inference of the soul's immortality is irresistible. Now it is its immortality, taken in connection with its capabilities of enjoyment, that especially stamps its worth. It would be unspeakably precious if it were to live only for a few brief ages, and then to sink into

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