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NATIONAL AIRs—continued.

MISCELLANEOUS PoEus-continued.

No-Leave my Heart to rest

508 intimated some Idea of giving up all

Where are the Visions

Political Pursuits.

Wind thy Horn, my Hunter Boy

509 My Birthday

577

Oh, Guard our Affection

59 Fancy

573

Slumber, oh Slumber

5.19 Love and Hymen

57 8

Translation from Catullus

Bring the bright Garlands hither

If in Loving, Singing

To my Mother

Thou Lov'st no more

510 Scepticism.

When Abroad in the World

510 Country Dance and Quadrille

• 579

510

Keep those Eyes still purely Mine

581

Song

Hope comes again

511 Genius and Criticism

582

O say, thou Best and Brightest

51)

When Vight brings the Ilour

511 HUMOROUS AND SATIRICAL POEMS.

. 511

Like One who, Doomed

583

To Sir Hudson Lowe

Fear not that, while around thee

512

Fragment of a Character

543

When Love is kind

512 The Devil among the Scholars

684

The Garland I send thee

512 Fum and Hum, the two Birds of Royalty 587

How shall I woo?

512 Epistle from Tom Cribb to Big Ben

• 588

Spring and Autumn

An Amatory Colloquy between Bank

Love alone.

and Government

589

The Meeting of the Ships.

5:3

Ode to the Goddess Ceres.

590

Hip, Hip, Hurra!

. 511 Dialogue between a Sovereign and a

Hush, Hush !

514 One-Pound Yote

591

The Parting before the Battle

54

An Expostulation to Lord King

5:2

The Watchman

515 Moral Positious

594

Say, what shall we

dance

515 Memorabilia of List Week

595

A Hymn of Welcome after the Recess
A MELOLOGCE UPON NATIONAL MUSIC 516 All in the Family Way

591

The Canonization of St. B tt r

THE LOVES OF THE ANGELS.

w-rth

597

Preface

519 New Creation of Peers :

599

First Angel's Story

A Cambridge Ballad

600

Second Angel's Story

527 Copy of an Intercepted Despatch. 601

Third Angel's Story

541 Mr. Roger Dodsworth

602

The Millennium

603

FABLES FOR THE HOLY ALLIANCE,

The Three Doctors

604

To Lord Byron

545 Epitaph on a Tuft-Hunter

605

Preface

545 The Petition of the Orangemen of Ire-

Fable I. - The Dissolution of the Holy

land

605

Alliance

546 A Vision.

€ 07

Fable II.

- The Lonking-Glasses 547 News for Country Cousins

609

Fable 111.-The Torch of Liberty

549 An Incantation

609

Fahle IV. -The Fly and the Bullock. 550 A Dream of Turtle

609

Fable V. -Church and State.

551 Cotton and Corn

610

Pabie VI.-The Little Grand Lama

The Donkey and his Panniers

611

Fable VII.-The Extinguishers

Ode to the Sublime Porto

The Ghost of Miltiades

612

RHYMES ON THE ROAD, extracted from Corn and Catholics

613

the Journal of a Travelling Member The Periwinkles and the Locusts

614

of the Pococurante Society, 1819 557 A Case of Libel

Literary Advertisement

616

MISCELLANEOrs PoEns OF VARIOUS DATES. The Slave
Lines on the Death of Mr. P-r-j. I never give a kiss,' says Prue

570 On a Sqninting Poetess

Lines on the Death of sh-sd-n

570 A Joke Versified

618

Lines written on hearing that the Aug.

618

trians had entered Naples .

572

A Speculation :

618

'To Lady Holland, On Napoleon's Le- From the French

619

gacy of a Snuff-Box

573 Illustration of a Bore

619

Romance

573

Epilogue to the Tragedy of Ina

573 | BALLADS AND SONGS.

The Sylph's Ball

575 Black and Blue Eyes

620

Remonstrınce, after a Conversation with Cease, oh Cease to Tempt

620
Lord John Russell, in which he had Dear Fanny

620

· 521

. 612

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MEMOIR OF MOORE.

THOMAS MOORE was born in Aungier Street, Dublin, May 28, 1779. His father was a respectable grocer and spirit dealer. Both his parents were Roman Catholics.

As early as his fourteenth year, Moore wrote verses, contributing to a Dublin magazine, called the Anthologia Hibernica. He was educated first, by Mr. Samuel Whyte (the schoolmaster also of Richard Brinsley Sheridan) and completed his studies at Dublin University ; which was opened to Romai Catholic students only the year previous to his entrance at Trinity College1794. While studying the classics he also learned Italian from a priest, and French from a French emigrant. He likewise became a proficient in music.

In 1799 Moore left his own country for England, bringing with him his Odes to Anacreon.' The Poet was not rich, but he found a kind and powerful friend in Lord Moira, who obtained permission from the Prince Regent for Moore to dedicate his Odes to His Royal Highness, and also raised a profitable subscription for their publication. Moore had entered himself a student of the Middle Temple ou his arrival in England, but the success of his Odes' induced him to abandon the study of the law, and to adopt literature as his profession. In 1801 he published a volume of Poems under the cognomen of "Thomas Little'-alluding to his own diminutive stature. They were very immoral and indelicate, and he felt ashamed of them in after years.

In 1803 he obtained an appointment at Bermuda, as Registrar to the Court of Admiralty. He proceeded thither the next year, but finding the duties of the post uncongenial, he appointed a deputy to do the work in his stead; and, 'after travelling over part of America, returned to England, greatly disabused of the Republican visions which had haunted his boyhood and youth. In 1806 Moore published his Odes and Epistles, which contain Poetical Satires on America, and Poems relating to the same country. Jeffrey criticised them with great severity in the Edinburgh Review, and Moore, much enraged, challenged him. The critic and the poet met at Chalk Farm, but the duel was prevented by the intervention of the police, when it was found that one of the pistols was without a bullet! The intended combatants ended by becoming great friends, and the circumstance is only memorable as originating the friendship between Byron and Moore—Byron, mentioning the duel with ridicule in "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers,” received, in his turn, a challenge from the highspirited little poet; but the letter was long in reaching its destination, and the affair terminated in a good-natured explanation from Byron, which led to a lifelong friendship.

Moore became the fashion in London, and was a welcome guest at the tables of the aristocracy. In 1807 he entered into an arrangement with Mr. Power, a musical publisher, to write poems for a collection of Irish Melodies, which were to be arranged, etc., by Sir J. Stevenson. These Melodies established the author's fame by the immense popularity they obtained

In 1811 Moore married Miss Bessie Dykes, a young Irish actress of great beauty, who proved a tender and devoted wife. In 1814 he agreed to write Lalla Rookh' for Messrs. Longmans, who were to pay him £3000 for the work when completed, which was in 1817. His other works—'Sacred aud National Melodies,' • Loves of the Angels,' etc., etc., followed in rapid succession

In 1818. Moore's deputy in Bermuda fled with the proceeds of a ship and cargo, leaving Moore answerable for £6000. This circumstance obliged him to leave England for a time, and to these enforced travels we owe “Rhymes on the Road,” etc. When his affairs were settled, Moore returned to England.

Moore had three children; they all died before him. The close of his life was as sad as that of the lives of Southey and Scott; for, three years before his death he was reduced to a state of sad mental infirmity, requiring all the self-devotion of his excellent wife. He died at Sloperton Cottage, in February, 1852, at the age of seventy-three.

Moore was an excellent son and husband, and a warm and faithful friend. His social accomplishments were of a high order ; his poetry is graceful and full of fancy and sentiment.

PUBLISHER'S PREFACE.

This Edition contains everything of Moore's Poems in which copyright has expired. They have been carefully compared with existing issues, and Explanatory Notes added where necessary.

ODES OF ANACREON.

1800.

DEDICATION

TO HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS

THE PRINCE OF WALES.

SIR,– In allowing me to dedicate this work to your Royal Highness, you have conferred upon me an honour which I feel very sensibly; and I have only to regret that the pages which you have thus distinguished are not more deserving of such illustrious patronage.

Believe me,

SIR,
With erery sentiment of respect,

Your Royal Highness's

Very grateful and devoted Servant,

THOMAS MOORE.

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