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Borough of Kildare. Borough of Carling ford. Francis Leigh, Esq.

Christopher Peppard Fitz IgRobert Porter, Esq.

natius, Esq. King's County. Bryan Dermot, E.sq. Hewer Oxburgh, Esq.

County of Roscommon. Owen Carrol, Esq.

Charles Kelly, Esq. Borough of Phiċipstowne. John Bourke, Esq. John Connor, Esq.

Borough of Fowre, in Commitat. Hewer Oxburgh, Esq.

West Meath. Borough of Bannagher. John Nugent, of Donore, Esq. Terence Coghlan, Esq. Christopher Nugent, of DarTerence Coghlan, Gent.

dystowne Borough of Drogheda. Borough of St. Johnston, in Henry Dowdal, Esq. Recor- Commit. Long ford. der

Sir William Ellis, Knt. Christopher Peppard Fitz Lieutenant Colonel James NuGeorge, Alderman

gent County of Lowth. Borough of Portarlington, in Thomas Bellew, Esq.

Queen's County. William Talbot, Esq.

Sir Henry Bond, Bart. Borough of Atherdee. Sir Thomas Hacket, Knt. Hugh Gernon, Esq.

Monaghan.
John Babe, Esq.

Bryan Mac Mahon, Esq.
Borough of Dundalk.

Hugh Mac Mahon, Esq.
Robert Dermot, Esq.

Gowran. John Dowdgall, Esq.

Colonel Robert Fielding, in

stead of Richard Butler, Esq. The commons chose Sir Richard Nagle their speaker, and Mr. John Kernly was clerk of that house.

KING JAMES's SPEECH TO BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT IN

IRELAND, PUBLISHED BY HIS MAJESTY'S ORDER, May 10th, 1689.

MY LORDS AND GENTLEMEN,

THE exemplary loyalty, which this nation exprest to me, at a time when others of my subjects so undutifully behaved themselves to me, or so basely betrayed me; and your seconding my deputy as you did, in his bold and resolute asserting my right, and preserving this kingdom for me, and putting it in a posture of defence, made me resolve to come to you, and to venture my life with you, in the defence of your iberty, and my right; and to my great satisfaction I have not only found you ready and willing to serve me, but that your courage has equalled your zeal. I have always been for liberty of conscience, and against invading any man's property; having still in my mind the saying of holy writ, Do as you would be done by; for that is the law and the prophets. It was this li. berty of conscience I gave, which my enemies both abroad and at home dreaded, especially when they saw, that I was resolved to have it established by law in all my dominions, and made them set themselves up against me, though for different reasons ; seeing that if I had once settled it, my people in the opinion of the one would have been too happy, and in the opinion of the other too great. This argument was made use of to persuade their own people to join with them, and too many of my own subjects to use me as they have done ; but nothing shall ever persuade me to change my mind as to that: and wheresoever I am master, I design, God willing, to establish it by law, and to have no other test

or distinction, but that of loyalty. I expect your concurrence in so Christian a work, and in making effectual laws against profanings and debauchery. I shall also most readily consent to the making such good and wholesome laws, as may be for the general good of the nation, the improvement of trade, and the relieving such as have been injured by the late acts of settlement, as far forth as may be consistent with reason, justice, and the public good of my people. And as I shall do my part to make you happy and rich, so I make no doubt of your assistance, by enabling me to oppose the unjust designs of my enemies, and to make this nation flourish. And to encourage you the more to it, you know with how great generosity and kindness the most Christian king gave a secure retreat to the queen, my son, and self, when we were forced out of England, and came to seek protection and safety in his dominions; how he embraced my interest, and gave such supplies of all sorts, as enabled me to come to you, which without his obliging assistance I could not have done : this he did at a time, when he had so many and so considerable enemies to deal with ; and you see still continues to do. I shall conclude as I began, and assure you, I am as sensible as you can desire me, of the signal loyalty you have exprest to me, and shall make it my chief study, as it always has been, to make you and all my subjects happy,

1

THE PARLIAMENT OF IRELAND'S ADDRESS TO THE KING.

NOST GRACIOUŚ SOVEREIGN,

WE your majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the lords spiritual and temporal, and cominons in parliament assembled, being highly sensible of the great honour and happiness we enjoy by your royal presence amongst us, do most humbly and heartily thank your sacred majesty for vouchsafing to come into this kingdom of Ireland; and for your grace and goodness to your subjects in calling this parliament, and for your majesty's tender and princely affection expressed to all your loving subjects, in your majesty's gracious speech at the opening of this session, which we most humbly beseech your majesty may be forthwith printed and published. And we fur. ther crave leave humbly to represent to your majesty, our abhorrence and detestation of the late treasons and defections of many of your majesty's subjects in this and your other kingdom; and the unnatural usurpation of the Prince of Orange, against the laws of God and man; professing with our voice, tongue, and heart, that we will ever be ready to assert and vindicate your majesty's rights to your imperial crown with our lives and fortunes against the said usurper and his adherents, and all other rebels and traitors whatsoever.

Ordered the 10th of May, 1689, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in parliament assembled, that this address be printed.

B. POLEWHELE, DEP. CL. PARL.

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THE SEVERAL BILLS THAT PASSED BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIA:

MENT IN THE SESSION BEGUN AT DUBLIN, THE 7TH OF MAY, 1689, TO WHICH THE LATE KING ASSENTED, ARE AS FOL

LOWS.

1. An act of recognition.

2. An act for annulling and making void all patents of officers for life or during good behaviour.

3. An act declaring that the parliament of England cannot bind Ireland, and against writs of error, and appeals to be brought for removing judgments, decrees, and sentences in Ireland into England.

4. An act for repealing the acts of settlement and explanation, resolution of the doubts and all grants, patents and certificates, pursuant to them, or any of them.

5. An act for punishing of persons who bring in counterfeit coin of foreign realms, being current in this realı, or counterfeit the same within this realm, or wash, clip, file or lighten the

same.

6. An act for taking off all incapacities of the natives of this kingdom.

7. An act for taking away the benefits of the clergy in certain cases of felony in this kingdom for two years.

8. An act to continue two acts made to prevent delays in execution ; and to prevent arrests of judgment and superseding executions.

9. An act for repealing a statute, intituled, An act for provisions of ministers in cities and corporate towns.

And for making the church of St. Andrew's, in the suburbs of the city of Dublin, presentative for ever.

10. An act of supply for his majesty for the support of his ariny.

11. An act for repealing the act for keeping and celebrating the 23d of October, as an anniversary thanksgiving in this kingdom.

12. An act for liberty of conscience, and repealing such acts or clauses in any act of parliament, which are inconsistent with the same.

13. An act concerning tythes, and other ecclesiastical duties.

14. An act for regulating tythes, and other ecclesiastical duties in the province of Ulster.

15. An act concerning appropriate tythes, and other duties payable to ecclesiastical dignitaries.

16. An act for repealing the act for real union and division of parishes, and concerning churches, free schools and exchanges.

17. An act for relief and release of poor distressed prisoners, for debts.

18. An act for repealing an act, intituled, An Act for confirmation of letter patents, granted to his Grace James Duke of Ormond.

19. An act for encouragement of strangers and others to inhabit and plant in the kingdom of Ireland.

20. An act for prevention of frauds and perjuries.

21. An açt prohibiting the importation of English, Scotch, or Welsh coals into this kingdom.

22. An act for ratifying and confirming deeds and settlements, and last wills and testaments of persons out of possession.

23. An act for the speedy recovering servants wages.

24. An act for vesting in his majesty the goods of absentees. 25. An act concerning martial law.

26. An act for punishment of waste committed on lands, restorable to old proprietors.

27. An act to enable · his majesty to regulate the duties of foreign commodities.

28. An act for the better settling intestates estates.

29. An act for advance and improvement of trade, and for the encouragement and increase of shipping and navigation.

30. An act for the attainder of divers rebels, and for the preserving the interest of loyal subjects.

31. An act for granting and confirming unto the Duke of Tyrconnel, lands and tenements to the value of 15,000l. per

annum.

32. An act for securing the water-course for the castle and city of Dublin.

33. An act for relieving Dame Anna Yolanda, Sarracourt, alias Duval and her daughter.

34. An act for securing iron-works and land thereunto belonging, on Sir Henry Waddington, Knight, at certain rates.

35. An act for the reversal of the attainder of William Ryan, of Bally Ryan, in the county of Tipperary, Esq. and for restoring him to his blood, corrupted by the said attainder.

THE PREAMBLE TO THE

ACT OF

REPEAL OF

THE ACTS OF

SETTLEMENTS AND EXPLANATION, &c. AS IT PASSED THE

HOUSE OF COMMONS.

WHEREAS the ambition and avarice of the lords justices ruling over this your kingdom, in 1641, did engage them to gather a malignant party and cabal of the then privy council, contrary to their sworn faith and natural allegiance, in a secret intelligence and traitorous combination, with the Puritan sectaries in the realm of Great Britain, against their lawful and undoubted sovereign, his peace, crown and dignity, the malice of which made it soon manifest in the nature and tendency of their proceedings, their untimely prorogations of a loyal unanimous parliament, and thereby making void, and disappointing the effects of many seasonable votes, bills and addresses, which pas- . sed into law, had certainly secured the peace and tranquillity of this kingdom, by binding to his majestie, the hearts of his Irish subjects; as well by the tyes of affection and gratitude, as

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