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FOR FINDING THE DOMINICAL OR SUNDAY-LETTER,

AND THE PLACES OF THE GOLDEN NUMBERS IN THE CALENDAR.

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To find the Dominical or Sunday Letter for any given Year of our Lord, add to the year its fourth part, omitting fractions, and also the number, which in Table I. standeth at the top of the column, wherein the number of hundreds contained in that given year is found: Divide the sum by 7, and if there is no remainder, then A is the Sunday Letter; but if any number remaineth, then the Letter, which standeth under that number at the top of the Table, is the Sunday Letter.

To find the Month and Days of the Month to which the Golden Numbers ought to be prefixed in the Calendar, in any given Year of our Lord, consisting of entire hundred years, and in all the intermediate years betwixt that and the next hundredth year following, look in the second column of Table II. for the given year, consisting of entire hundreds, and note the number or cypher which stands against it in the third column; then, in Table III. look for the same number in the column under any given Golden Number, which when you have found, guide your eye side-ways to the left hand, and in the first column you will find the Month and Day to which that Golden Number ought to be prefixed in the Calendar, during that period of one hundred

years.

The letter B prefixed to certain hundredth years in Table II. denotes those years which are still to be accounted Bissextile or Leap Years in the New Calendar; whereas all the other hundredth years are to be accounted only common years.

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THE Morning and Evening Prayer shall be used in the accustomed Place of the Church, Chapel, or Chancel; except it shall be otherwise determined by the Ordinary of the Place. And the Chancels shall remain as they have done in times past. 3

And here is to be noted, that such Ornaments of the Church, and of the Ministers thereof, at all times of their Ministration, shall be retained, and be in use, as were in this Church of England, by the Authority of Parliament, in the Second Year of the Reign of King Edward the Sixth.

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1. The necessity of public fixed & appropriate places of worship may be argued from the universal practice of the steathers, of the Jews, of the Apostles, (to wh we may refer the onegier) and of the primitive actions. I the latter on the authority of J. Martyr, "apol 1.07.) _ the form of the early Churches who were built was oblong, (to resemble a ship) & divided into a Nave, & Sacrarium or Chancel (a cancelles). And the people always prayed with their faces to the East. _ The use of images was expreply forbidden, and the want of them defended. _ Epiphanis has a remarkable instance of this. - Decency consecration considered necessary. –

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2. All divine service, was formerly performed in the choir : & so ordered in Edw : " 1? " books _ In the 2nd owing to Bucer, he was ordled to be where the minister c? best be heard: on who many tif: : ferences & disputes arou: and the old custom was restored by 2. Eliz: – La dispentry power given to the ordinary._ Stence arose the use of reading Jews, wh, according to the last review in Ch: 2nd time, we may suphone are here meant by accustomed place "_ the dispensing power is still with the ordinary; contrary to Bucer's violent desire that there &? be distincting of place in the Church.

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4. This fit and according to primitive custom that churches to be decently adorned . _ The ornaments of the Minister here meant according to the act are owing payers, a surplice & hood, Whilthat the Altar, an alb, vestiment or cope. _ & Bishop is to wear his Rochette & have a staff or crosier.__. All there were discon : : timed in Edw. " 2nd Book, but restored by 2. Eliz : &to contime in force, according to the Act of tui formity 1662. _ Surplice, to called from Super pelliceum, because anciently used over wathern couts made of hides: and represently the offence of our first parents hid by the grace of t.. If lay authorities wear distinctive ornaments, it surely is not only lawful but proper also for the ministers of God._

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5. See especially, Hunter's tract abt Peter Smart's important.

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