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They feed on herbs and shrubs in the evening. In the day time they keep quiet in their holes. - If they come out, they get shot. Catch a hare be·fore you cook it.

LITTLE ROBIN REDBREAST. Little Robin Red-breast sat upon a tree, Up went Pussy-cat, and down went he ; Down came Pussy-cat, and away Robin ran: Says little Robin Red-breast, “Catch me if you can." Little Robin Red-breast hopp'd upon a wall, Pussy-cat jump'd after him, and almost got a fall. Little Robin chirpd and sang, and what did Pussy say? Pussy-cat said, “Mew," and Robin flew away.

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owl flies

made

peace fowl tries shade

geese round

eyes glade cease

THE OWL. The owl is a large bird, and it has long sharp claws.

Its large round eyes are so made that it can see best in the dark.

As the owl can not see well when the sun shines, it then flies to the glade. There it sits and scowls all day in the shade.

Then all the small birds peck at the owl, so that it has no peace.

When the sun has set, it comes to the barn to catch mice for its sup'per.

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Of all the birds that ever I

see,
The owl is the fairest in her degree;
For all the day long she sits in a tree,
And when night comes, away flies she,
Te whit te whoo! How d’ye do?

NUMBER. one, 1 four, 4

seven, 7 two, 2 five, 5

eight, 8 three, 3

six, 6
6

nine, 9
SONG FOR THE FINGERS.
1. This little fat pig went to market,
2. This pig staid at home,
3. This pig had roast meat,
4. And this pig had none,
5. This wee pig said, “Wee, wee, weee !
I can't find

my

home.”

,

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• The fingers should at first be largely employed to give a notion of number; then marbles, or wood counters, or any objects loosely strewn on a board. [These lessons are, of course, merely sugges tive, and they are not designed to be read straight through.]

Mary had a cushion

Given by her mother ;
It had 2 pins on one side

And 3 pins on the other,
How many pins in all

Were on the little ball ?*

Two peaches had mother,
And three had my brother;
They gave them to Ben,
So five had he then.

Three apples had Carry,
And three had our Harry;
They gave two to Kate,
And the others they ate.t

one, two,

eleven, twelve, buckle my shoe;

who will delve ? three, four,

thirteen, fourteen, shut the door;

draw the curtain; five, six,

fifteen, sixteen, pick up sticks ; fetch the sticks in; seven, eight, seventeen, eighteen, lay them straight; put your plate in; nine, ten,

nineteen, twenty, a good fat hen; my plate is empty.

These rhymes should be copied by the pupil, figures being used for the numbers. The numbers should be constantly varied, for which the printing or writing of the rhymes on the black-board will affori excellent facilities.

+ Ilow many did they eat ?

Of all the birds that ever I see,
The owl is the fairest in her degree ;
For all the day long she sits in a tree,
And when night comes, away flies she,
Te whit te whoo! How d'ye do?

5

NUMBER. one, 1 four, 4

seven, 7 two, 2 five, 5

eight, 8 three, 3

six, 6
,

nine, 9
SONG FOR THE FINGERS
1. This little fat pig went to market,
2. This pig staid at home,
3. This pig had roast meat,
4. And this pig had none,
5. This wee pig said, “Wee, wee, weee !

I can't find my home."

ten, 10

ten, 10

ten, 10

One, two, three, four, five,

I caught a hare alive;
Six, seven, eight, nine, ten,

I let it go again.

The fingers should at first be largely employed to give a notion of number; then marbles, or wood counters, or any objects loosely strewn on a board. [These lessons are, of course, merely suggest tive, and they are not designed to be read straight through.]

Mary had a cushion

Given by her mother;
It had 2 pins on one side

And 3 pins on the other,
How many pins in all

Were on the little ball ?*

Two peaches had mother,
And three had my brother;
They gave them to Ben,
So five had he then.

Three apples had Carry,
And three had our Harry;
They gave two to Kate,
And the others they ate.t

one, two,

eleven, twelve, buckle my shoe; who will delve ? three, four,

thirteen, fourteen, shut the door; draw the curtain; five, six,

fifteen, sixteen, pick up sticks; fetch the sticks in; seven, eight, seventeen, eighteen, lay them straight; put your plate in; nine, ten,

nineteen, twenty, a good fat hen; my plate is empty.

* These rhymes should be copied by the pupil, figures being used for the numbers. The numbers should be constantly varied, for which the printing or writing of the rhymes on the black-board will afford excellent facilities.

+ Ilow many did they eat ?

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