The London Lancet: A Journal of British and Foreign Medical and Chemical Science, Criticism, Literature and News

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Burgess, Stringer & Company, 1869

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Side 177 - ... skin, and so producing the boils which are apt to arise sometimes in clusters around the carbuncle. Of diet I have already spoken to you. Of medicines I say nothing. Quinine, bark, and other medicines of that class, may be given if you please, or in case of evident need, and so may aperients ; but there is really no need of them in an ordinary case of carbuncle. But there is one medicine which you may find very valuable, and that is opium, especially in all the earlier painful stages of carbuncle,...
Side 59 - Provost and Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine and of Clinical Medicine in the University of Pennsylvania.
Side 77 - The deaf-and-dumb gesticulate as they think. Laura Bridgman's fingers worked, making the initial movements for letters of the finger-alphabet, not only during her waking thoughts but even in her dreams.
Side 59 - English language, and as such it deserves the favor it has received. — Am. Journ. Medical Sciences, July 1868. We need not dwell on the merits of the third edition of this magnificently conceived work. It is the work on Materia Medica, in which Therapeutics are primarily considered — the mere natural history of drugs being briefly disposed of. To medical practitioners this is a very valuable conception. It is wonderful how much of the riches of the literature of Materia Medica has been condensed...
Side 195 - ... most esteemed. The power of this drug over inflammation is little less than marvellous. It can sometimes at once cut short the inflammation. It does not remove the products of inflammation when these are formed, but by controlling the disease, it prevents the formation of these, and so saves the tissues from further injury. It is therefore in the early stage of inflammation that the good effects of this plant are most conspicuous ; still, although the disease may have progressed to some extent,...
Side 177 - ... of their ordinary amount of food, and about the same proportion of their ordinary quantity of stimulants. But indeed there is scarcely any reason to change in any material degree the ordinary mode of life of a patient with carbuncle. So far as he can with comfort take that to which he is accustomed, so far he may. If his diet has been habitually low, so it may remain ; if habitually high, so, within certain limits and somewhat reduced, it may still remain. Now you may ask what I should set down...
Side 289 - The double fault is less mischievous than the single ; the eating counteracts the harm that would ensue from the drinking. If we look about in society we may see this very plainly. There are still many persons habitually engaged in too great eating and drinking, doing both to excess ; and they are in danger of breaking down in various defects of digestion and the consequent disturbances, but they are in no danger of delirium tremens. The people who are in that danger, and show the evil effects of...
Side 176 - Oo these three points, which are the grounds that have been assigned as reasons for cutting carbuncles, I have now given you the evidence on which I have ceased from the practice. I fully believe that crucial incisions do not prevent extension ; that it is only a limited set of cases in which the incisions diminish pain ; and that with regard to the time that is occupied in healing with or without incisions, the healing without incisions is very clearly and certainly a great deal the quicker. The...
Side 175 - ... to it. It is commonly said that if you will thus make crucial incisions into a carbuncle, you will prevent it spreading. If you can find a carbuncle two or three days old, and cut that right across in both directions, I think it very likely that you will prevent it spreading. But even therein is a fallacy; for there is no sign by which, on looking at a commencing carbuncle, you can tell whether it will spread or not, whether it will have a diameter of one inch, or of three, six, or ten inches.
Side 215 - THE authors are desirous of bringing under the notice of the profession a few more cases of rheumatic fever which have been treated by mint water, or, in other words, which have been allowed to run their natural course. They moreover desire to point out what appears to be the natural course of rheumatic fever with reference to the heart, and to show in what proportion of cases the heart became involved when rheumatic fever was treated by mint water. Lastly, to consider if there is any evidence to...

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