Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft

Forsideomslag
Harper & Brothers, 1836 - 338 sider
 

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I
3
II
42
III
73
IV
98
V
117
VI
142
VII
159
VIII
182
IX
231
X
280

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Populære passager

Side 66 - The lonely mountains o'er And the resounding shore A voice of weeping heard, and loud lament; From haunted spring and dale, Edged with poplar pale, The parting Genius is with sighing sent; With flower-inwoven tresses torn The Nymphs in twilight shade of tangled thickets mourn...
Side 66 - The oracles are dumb, No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving. Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving. No nightly trance or breathed spell Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic cell.
Side 152 - At morning and at evening both, You merry were and glad, So little care of sleep...
Side 152 - Farewell, rewards and fairies, Good housewives now may say, For now foul sluts in dairies Do fare as well as they; And though they sweep their hearths no less Than maids were wont to do, Yet who of late for cleanliness Finds sixpence in her shoe ? Lament, lament, old abbeys, The fairies' lost command, They did but change priests...
Side 56 - There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch, "Or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer.
Side 45 - Of hot pursuit - the broken cry of deer Mangled by throttling dogs, the shouts of men, And hoofs thick beating on the hollow hill.
Side 48 - Thro ilka bore the beams were glancing, And loud resounded mirth and dancing. Inspiring bold John Barleycorn, What dangers thou canst make us scorn! Wi tippenny, we fear nae evil; Wi usquabae, we'll face the Devil!
Side 332 - I was only nineteen or twenty years old, when I happened to pass a night in the magnificent old baronial castle of Glammis, the hereditary seat of the Earls of Strathmore. The hoary pile contains much in its appearance, and in the traditions connected with it, impressive to the imagination. It was the scene of the murder of a Scottish king of great antiquity ; not, indeed, the gracious Duncan, with whom the name naturally associates itself, but Malcolm II. It contains also a curious monument of the...
Side 153 - Churne of Staffordshire Give laud and praises due, Who every meal can mend your cheer With tales both old and true : To William all give audience, And pray ye for his noddle, For all the fairies' evidence Were lost, if it were addle.
Side 41 - Not long after the death of a late illustrious poet, who had filled, while living, a great station in the eye of the public, a literary friend, to whom the deceased had been well known, was engaged during the darkening twilight of an autumn evening in perusing one of the publications which professed to detail the habits and opinions of the distinguished individual who was now no more. As the reader had enjoyed the intimacy of the deceased to a considerable degree he was deeply interested in the publication,...

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