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The Awen's Revival

Henry Davies

Shades of the Great

S. R. Jackson

The Harp of Old Cambria

Anonymous

Days of Old and Deeds of Glory Anonymous

Cainbria’s Holiday

Rev. R. Hylton

Bards and Minstrels Merry

Henry Davies

The Rock of Cader Idris

Mrs. Hemans

The Song of the Sons of Madoc

S. R. Jackson

The Dying Bard

Sir Walter Scott

The Minstrel-y of Chirk Castle

J. F. M. Dovaston

Owain Glyndwr's War Song

Mrs. Hemans

The Death of dower

Llewelyn Prichard

Einion the Soother

Richaril Llwyd

Ar hyd y Nos

Anonymous

The Bard's La:t Lay

Anonymous

The Tudor Reign

Anonymous

The Dark Isle's Mystic Power

Mrs. Hemans

The Beautiful Isle

Ibil

The Missletoe

Anonymous

The Death of Llewelyn

J. H. Parry

The Bard's Lament for Cynddylan S. R. Jackson

The Meeting of the Bards

Anonymous

The Norman Horse Shoe

Sir Walter Scott

Megan has lost her Garter

J. F. M. Dovaston

The Dee's Druid Water

Wiffen

Taliesin's Prophecy

Mrs. Hemans

Lays of Romantic Story

Rev. G. H. Glasse

Aberteivy:

Llewelyn Prichard

The War Song of Bleddyn

S. R. Jackson

Where the Long Grass Waves

Ibid

Song of the Absent Cambrians

J. Jones ...

The Heroes of Cambria

J. H. Parry

The Green Isles of the Ocean

Mrs. Hemans

The Daughter of Megan

J. F. M. Dovaston

The March of the Monks of Bangor {.. Sir Walter Scott

Prince Madoc's Farewell

Mrs. Hemans

The Death our Fathers Found

S. R. Jackson

Sons of the Mighty

Ibid

The Worthies of Wales

Llewelyn Prichard

Carno Hills

S. R. Jackson

The Chaunt of the Bards

Mrs. Hemans

The Sweet flowing Muse

John Parry

Of Noble Race was Shenkin

John Dryden

The Saxon Maid with Yellow Hair S. R. Jackson

The Man who will Slander

John Parry

Nature's High Sovereignty

Mrs. Hemans

The Exile of Cambria

Anonymous

Ellen Dear

J. Jones

Adieu to the Cottage

Anonymous

The last Welsh Minstrel

S. R. Jackson

The Lover's Similes

J. F. M. Dovaston

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POEMS, HISTORIC AND

LEGENDARY.

THE

CAMBRIAN WREATH :

Poems, Historical, Legendary, and Humorous.

ANCIENT BARDS AND DRUIDS.

From Lucan's Pharsalia.

MARCUS ANNæus LUCAN was of an Equestrian family of Rome, and born at Corduba in Spain about A. D. 39. in the reign of the emperor Caligula. Lucan wrote several poems, but the Pharsalia is the only one that now remains. He suffered death in the 27th year of his age, and the tenth of the emperor Nero. The Pharsalia was translated from the original Latin into English verse by Mr. Nicholas Rowe, who died in 1718, just as he had completed his version.

Ye Bards wbom sacred raptures fire
To chaunt your heroes to your country's lyre;
Who consecrate in your immortal strain,
Brave patriot souls in righteous battle slain ;
Securely now the tuneful task renew,
And noblest themes in deathless songs pursue.

The Druids now, while arms are heard no more,
Old mysteries, and barb'rous rites restore;
A tribe who singular religion love,
And haunt the lonely coverts of the grove.

B

To these, and these of all mankind alone,
The gods are sure reveal'd, or sure unknown.
If dying mortals' dooms they sing aright,
No ghosts descend to dwell in dreadful night;
No parting souls to grisly Pluto go,
Nor seek the dreary silent shades below;
But forth they fly immortal in their kind,
And other bodies in new worlds they find.
Thus life for ever runs its endless race,
And like a line, death but divides the space,
A stop which can but for a moment last,
A point between the future and the past.
Thrice happy they beneath their northern skies
Who that worst fear, the fear of death despise ;
Hence they no cares for this frail being feel,
But rush undaunted on the pointed steel :
Provoke approaching fate, and bravely scorn
To spare that life which must so soon return.

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE ANCIENT

BRITISH BARDS.

An Ode, in the manner of Taliesin.

By EDWARD WILLIAMS, (IOLO MORGANWG.)

The following abbreviated account of the doctrine of the METEM. PSYCHOSIS, which forms the machinery of this poem, is from the author's own introduction to it. “All animated beings originate in the lowest point of existence, whence, by a regular gradation, they rise higher and higher in the scale of existence, till they arrive at the highest state of happiness and perfection that is possible for finite beings. Beings, as their souls, by passing from ferocious to more gentle and harmless animals, approach the state of humanity. become ameliorated in their dispositions, less influenced by evil, and

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