The Transactions of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, Bind 3

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Side 80 - I know a bank whereon the wild thyme blows, Where ox-lips and the nodding violet grows ; Quite over-canopied with lush woodbine, With sweet musk-roses, and with eglantine...
Side 14 - And where heretofore there hath been great diversity in saying and singing in churches within this Realm : some following Salisbury Use, some Hereford Use, some the Use of Bangor, some of York, and some of Lincoln : now from henceforth, all the whole realm shall have but one Use.
Side 30 - The very first thing that strikes one, in reading the Mabinogion, is how evidently the mediaeval story-teller is pillaging an antiquity of which he does not fully possess the secret; he is like a peasant building his hut on the site of Halicarnassus or Ephesus; he builds, but what he builds is full of materials of which he knows not the history, or knows by a glimmering tradition merely; — stones 'not of this building,' but of an older architecture, greater, cunninger, more majestical.
Side 31 - ... his hut on the site of Halicarnassus or Ephesus ; he builds, but what he builds is full of materials of which he knows not the history, or knows by a glimmering tradition merely ; — stones " not of this building," but of an older architecture, greater, cunninger, more majestical.
Side 142 - And Abraham gat up early in the morning to the place where he stood before the LORD : and he looked toward Sodom and Gomorrah, and toward all the land of the plain, and beheld, and, lo, the smoke of the country went up as the smoke of a furnace.
Side 69 - For whether we take history for our guide, or native tradition, or philology — we are led to no other conclusion but this : that no Gael ever set his foot on British soil save from a vessel that had put out from Ireland.
Side 79 - Bran deems it a marvellous beauty In his coracle across the clear sea: While to me in my chariot from afar It is a flowery plain on which he rides about. What is a clear sea For the prowed skiff in which Bran is, That is a happy plain with profusion of flowers To me from the chariot of two wheels. Bran sees The number of waves beating across the clear sea : I myself see in Mag Mon1 Red-headed flowers without fault.
Side 51 - The Celt's quick feeling for what is noble and distinguished gave his poetry style ; his indomitable personality gave it pride and passion; his sensibility and nervous exaltation gave it a better gift still, the gift of rendering with wonderful felicity the magical charm of nature.
Side 152 - CYMMBODORION, originally founded under Royal patronage in 1751, was revived in 1873, with the object of bringing into closer contact Welshmen, particularly those resident out of Wales, who are anxious to advance the welfare of their country ; and of enabling them to unite their efforts for that purpose.
Side xv - The Black Book of St. David's. An Extent of all the Lands and Rents of the Lord Bishop of St. David's, made by Master David Fraunceys, Chancellor of St. David's in the time of the Venerable Father the Lord David Martyn, by the grace of God Bishop of the place, in the year of our Lord 1326.

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