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“ Thus will I wake, thus will I sleep, ing, as another specimen of GasThus will I hope to rise,

coigne's poetry, a part of a dramatic Thus will I neither wail nor weep, chorus, in his Glass of Government, But sing in goodly wise.

a “ Tragical Comedy,” intended, it My bones shall in this bed remain,

is said, to expose the prevailing errors My soul in God shall trust,

of education. These lines are proBy whom I hope to rise again

bably the first example in the lanFrom death and earthly dust."

guage of this species of composi

tion. We may be excused for here add.

" When God ordain'd the restless state of man,

And made him thrall to sundry grievous cares,
The first-born grief or sorrow that began

To show itself was this : to save from snares
The pleasant pledge which God for us prepares :
I mean the seed and offspring that he gives
To any wight which in the world here lives.

“ Few see themselves, but each man seeth his child,

Such care for them, as care not for themselfe ;
We care for them in youth when wit is wild ;

We care for them in age to gather pelf.
We care for them to keep them from the shelf
Of such quick-sands, as we ourselves first found
When heady will did set our ships on ground."

Our next quotation shall be from a striking deficiency in social culture, Robert Green, best known as a dra- Who would desire to see in this respect matic writer, who was born about 1550, a retrograde movement, or to contine and died in 1592. He is said to have poetical composition to “ courtly mabeen the first English poet that wrote kers" or men of fortune ? Who is it for bread, and it has been observed that longs for the time when poets that his life thus forms “ a melancholy shall cease to write, and to write betepocha in the history of our literature." ter than they would otherwise do, either But is this justly said ? Is that a me- simply for bread, or for better bread lancholy era at which poetical talent than they would otherwise eat? Poor came to be employed as the means Green, however, diminished by his of supporting its possessor? Such a vices and follies both the honour and change seems rather to cast a gloomy advantage of his laudable exertions for hue upon the times that preceded it; a livelihood. Yet he seems, in the as implying either that the public had midst of dissipation, to have preservpreviously been unwilling to give ed some purity of taste, and tenderbread for poetry, or that poetry had ness of feeling. The following lines never arisen where there was a want are not without smoothness and ele. of bread. On either supposition, when

gance. properly followed out, we must infer

“ Sweet are the thoughts that savour of content ;

The quiet mind is richer than a crown :
Sweet are the nights in careless slumber spent ;

The poor estate scoros Fortune's angry frown.
Such sweet content, such minds, such sleep, such bliss
Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss.

“ The homely house that harbours quiet rest,

The cottage that affords no pride nor care,
The mean that 'grees with country music best,

The sweet consort of mirth and music's fare,
Obscured life sets down a type of bliss ;
A mind content both crown and kingdom is.”..

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Till with the Thracian m
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Accept her as a gift ; w
It chanced I came upon
For public games, in w
I took a part, and she 1

They shorts
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presline ourselves And of tus bedesc
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Shall make my ies are
Hy observe, lied in the "My bed itself is like the gate,
When thou haat spent the lingering day

My sheets the winding-sheet,
My clothes the mould which I mos bare

To cover me most meet.
The hungry fleas which frisk so freså,

Strids must be stilled wild Inliais.

lli Goud. Morrow and Good Night
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To worms I can compare, Which greedily shall guaw my desk, And leave the bones full bare.

"The waking cock that early crows

Pats in my mind the trump that blows

To wear the night away,

Before the latter day.
And as I rise up lustily

When sluggish sleep is past,
So hope I to rise joyfully
To judgment at the last.

[graphic]

I wake, thus will I sleep, ing, as another specimen of Gas-
I hope to rise,

coigne's poetry, a part of a dramatic neither wail nor weep, chorus, in his Glass of Government, 'in goodly wise.

a “ Tragical Comedy,” intended, it "hall in this bed remain, is said, to expose the prevailing errors in God shall trust,

of education. These lines are proI hope to rise again

bably the first example in the lanreath and earthly dust."

guage of this species of composi

tion. "ay be excused for here add

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" When God ordain'd the restless state of man,

And made him thrall to sundry grievous cares,
The first-born grief or sorrow that began

To show itself was this : to save from snares
The pleasant pledge which God for us prepares :
I mean the seed and offspring that he gives
To any wight which in the world here lives.

“Few see themselves, but each man seeth his child,

Such care for them, as care not for themselfe ;
We care for them in youth when wit is wild ;

We care for them in age to gather pelf.
We care for them to keep them from the shelf
Of such quick-sands, as we ourselves first found
When heady will did set our ships on ground.”

Our next quotation shall be from a striking deficiency in social culture, obert Green, best known as a dra- Who would desire to see in this respect atic writer, who was born about 1550, a retrograde movement, or to confine nd died in 1592. He is said to have poetical composition to “courtly maeen the first English poet that wrote kers" or men of fortune? Who is it or bread, and it has been observed, that longs for the time when poets hat his life thus forms " a melancholy shall cease to write, and to write betepocha in the history of our literature." ter than they would otherwise do, either But is this justly said ? Is that a me- simply for bread, or for better bread lancholy era at which poetical talent than they would otherwise eat? Poor came to be employed as the means Green, however, diminished by his of supporting its possessor? Such a vices and follies both the honour and change seems rather to cast a gloomy advantage of his laudable exertions for hue upon the times that preceded it; a livelihood. Yet he seems, in the as implying either that the public had midst of dissipation, to have preservpreviously been unwilling to give ed some purity of taste, and tenderbread for poetry, or that poetry had ness of feeling. The following lines never arisen where there was a want are not without smoothness and ele, of bread. On either supposition, when gance. properly followed out, we must infer

“ Sweet are the thoughts that savour of content ;

The quiet mind is richer than a crown :
Sweet are the nights in careless slumber spent ;

The poor estate scorns Fortune's angry frown.
Such sweet content, such minds, such sleep, such bliss
Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss.

The homely house that harbours quiet rest,

The cottage that affords no pride nor care,
The mean that 'grees with country music best,

The sweet consort of mirth and music's fare,
Obscured life sets down a type of bliss ;
A mind content both crown and kingdom is.".

The last line of these verses sug- “ Some have too much, yet still they gests a well known popular poem, of crave ; which the composition seems referable I little have, yet seek no more : to this or to an earlier period. “My They are but poor, tho' much they have, mind to me a kingdom is," the song

And I am rich with little store : to which we now refer, appears to They poor, I rich; they beg, I give ; have been printed and familiarly known They lack, I lend ; they pine, I live. some years prior to 1590. Its author is undiscovered, and is apparently be

“ I laugh not at another's loss,

I grudge not at another's gain : yond the reach of conjecture. It was

No worldly wave my mind can toss, a favourite subject of imitation in its

I brook that is another's bane : own day, and has been often since

I fear no foe, nor fawn on friend; inserted in poetical collections with a

I loath not life, nor dread mine end. high degree of praise. It is certainly in its own department a remarkable

" I wish but what I have at will, composition, and reflects credit on the

I wander not to seek for more : infancy or adolescence of English po- I like the plain, I climb no bill, pular poetry. The commencement, if

In greatest storms I sit on shore, now deprived of the charm of novelty, And laugh at them that toil in vain, is strong and impressive ; and several To get what must be lost again. of the lines or stanzas throughout are neatly expressed, smoothly construct “ My wealth is health and perfect ease, ed, and diversified by some variety of My conscience clear my chief defence; point and metaphor. Yet the leading I never seek by bribes to please, idea of the poem, such as it is, is not

Nor by desert to give offence; expanded with much fertility of

Thus do I live, thus will I die,

Would all did so as well as I." thought, or skilfulness of management.

The same things are repeated with needless iteration, and the brief and

If it were fair to subject a composententious phrases employed, while

sition of this popular kind to very they interrupt the flow of melody and

serious criticism, or if it deserved feeling, are often strung together with such a tribute to its importance, a out any natural tie of connexion or graver objection to this piece, as to congruity. The prevalence of this others of a similar character, might be fault may be apparent from the cir- found in the general coldness of its cumstance that different editors have temperature, connected with the faldifferently arranged a good number of laciousness of the sentiments involvthe stanzas, without its being easy to

ed in it. tell that the true order has been ma

“ My mind to me a kingdom is, terially violated. Weinsert such verses

Such perfect joy therein I find," of it as we think best deserving of attention.

has a lofty and imposing sound, and

seems the prelude to a proud display My mind to me a kingdom is,

of the noblest enjoyments and richest Such perfect joy therein I find,

resources of mental perfection, scarcely As far exceeds all earthly bliss

agreeable, indeed, to that humility That God or nature hath assigned ; which best becomes a human creature. Tho' much I want that most would have, But the progress of the poem is not Yet still my mind forbids to crave. suitable to its outset. The regal en" Content I live, this is my stay;

trance, by which we at first approach, I seek no more than may suffice :

proves, after all, to be the porch to I press to bear no haughty sway :

a cottage. It is found that the only Look, what I Jack, my mind supplies.

particulars in which the mind resemLo! thus I triumph like a king,

bles a kingdom, or is enabled to afford Content with what my mind doth bring.

its possessor such perfect joy, are

the subjugation of troublesome appeI see how plenty surfeits oft,

tites, and the absence of external ob. And hasty climbers soonest fall: jects of interest to ruflle its serenity. I see that such as sit aloft

No reference is made to the enjoyMishap doth threaten most of all : ment of any positive pleasure, to These get with toil and keep with fear : the indulgence of any social emotion, Such cares my mind could never bear. or the discharge of any active duty.

This is surely a poor view of that Soul's Errand, or the Lie," has had its noble domain, the mind of man, and due share of controversy and perhaps it is not a poetical one. Indifference of commendation. It has often been to human affections implies a low ascribed to Raleigh, and was at one tone, both of poetry and morality, as time supposed to have been written by there can be neither praise nor sym- him the night before his execution. pathy without virtuous exertion or What authentic instances there are of strong emotion. It must be confessed poetical composition in so awful a that several poems of the class we situation we shall not pause to enare now considering are pitched upon

quire; but

should be in general this under key, and seem merely to disposed to ascribe them less to magrepresent virtue as implying the ne. nanimity than to desperation, or the gation of vice, and to place the only love of effect. Certain we are that, in security from criminal indulgence in such moments, a man should be more the retrenchment of natural passion. intent on examining himself than on Some minds may find their best refuge condemning his fellow-creatures, and in this retreat from active life, but should be too much occupied with the they ought to announce their prefer- mysterious scene on which he is enterence with the humility of those who ing, to rail at the world from which have been forced to fly where it was he is taking his departure. But all their duty to fight. In a world of speculation as to the probability or creatures of kindred origin and con- propriety of such a poem being comstitution with ourselves, a proud exul- posed by this great man, in such cirtation in a state of mere quiescence, cumstances, is here excluded by the unaffected by the innumerable varia- facts. Raleigh perished in 1618, and tions of fortune and feeling occur

Mr Ellis observed that the poem apring around us to demand our sym- peared in “ Davison's Poetical Rhappathy, is nothing else than a refined sody” ten years before. Recent criselfishness, unattainable, indeed, in our tics, however, have somewhat pertiactual condition, and not desirable if naciously clung to a similar idea, with it could be attained. Such voluntary the modified suggestion, that the poem separatists from the natural union of might possibly have been written by the human family might be addressed Raleigh “ the night before he expected in lines, somewhat resembling, in to have been executed" in 1603. But homely plainness, the productions of it appears that the poem can be traced, the school which we are now consider. if not to print, at least to paper, ten ing:

years even before that date, so that ". My mind to me a kingdom is'

this new possibility becomes again No longer urge that swelling strain,

impossible. We must, therefore, be For who can hope the praise is his,

content to abandon entirely this roA monarch o'er himself to reign?

mantic account of its origin, and

either betake ourselves to some other « Nor boast that thus in cold content

theory, or submit to leave the matter Thou bear'st a calm and careless mind; in obscurity. Mr Ellis has rather Nor deign'st to laugh or to lament

rashly assigned the composition to For joys or sorrows of thy kind. the silver-tongued Sylvester, on no

better ground than that his editor has “ Such lonely life may lurk apart, kidnapped and disfigured it by inclu

Unreached by tainting passion's stain ; ding it with some wretched additional And what was once a human heart stanzas in the collection of his poems May lose the touch of human pain. in 1641. Ritson attributes it to Fran

cis Davison, in whose “ Rhapsody" the “ But heavy is the blame he bears earliest printed copy of it is found. But

Who, flying vice, flies virtue too : in the si Rhapsody" are collected the Whose fields, devoid of corn or tares, compositions of various authors, some Lie barren in his Maker's view.

by name and some anonymously, and

there is no special reason for ascribing “ And greater bliss it were to groan, this poem to Davison, whose signature

With all whose sufferings ask a sigh, is not affixed to it as it is to other Than, thus congealed to conscious stone,

pieces of his acknowledged composiUnwept, unweeping, live and die.”

tion. Mr Campbell enquires whether Our next object of selection, “ The the “ Soul's Errand" is not the same

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