Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, Bind 2

Forsideomslag
 

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Udvalgte sider

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 56 - ... possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me, and from my friends, , be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us, indifferent and unmoved, over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. The man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow...
Side 56 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future, predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me, and from my friends, be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us, indifferent and unmoved, over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among...
Side 5 - But bring a Scotsman frae his hill, Clap in his cheek a Highland gill, Say, such is royal George's will, An' there's the foe, He has nae thought but how to kill Twa at a blow.
Side 6 - King's regard, Can give a bliss o'ermatching thine, A rustic Bard. " To give my counsels all in one, Thy tuneful flame still careful fan ; Preserve the dignity of Man, With soul erect ; And trust, the Universal Plan Will all protect. "And wear thou this...
Side 100 - O Caledonia ! stern and wild, meet nurse for a poetic child, • land of brown heath and shaggy wood, land of the mountain and the flood, land of my sires!
Side 89 - The sun had opened golden yellow From his case, Though still the sky wore dark and drumly A scarr'd and frowning face ; Then troubled, tawny, dense, dun-bellied, Scowling and sea-blue ; Every dye that's in the tartan O'er it grew. Far away to the wild westward Grim it lowered, Where rain-charg'd clouds on thick squalls wandering Loomed and towered.'* With a grim shake of the head, Hamish got out spirit-lamp, kitchener, etc., and proceeded to make breakfast.
Side 115 - us caol ri caol " — broad to broad, and small to small ; ie — that in polysyllables the last vowel of one syllable, and the first vowel of the next syllable, must be of the same quality.
Side 44 - We had already arrived at the remarkable conclusion, that " No Englishman can tell with certainty how to pronounce any word which he has only seen written, and has not heard spoken.
Side 115 - Orthography is always in the rear of pronunciation." Both of these dicta are true; but the standard that certainly determines Orthography is the Press. Hence, since the invention of Printing in the 15TH Century, the variations of spelling are comparatively small and insignificant. determining the broad or small sound of the adjoining consonants. Now, a consonant has its broad sound both when preceded and •when followed by a broad vowel; in like manner it has its small sound, both when preceded...
Side 45 - Scotland have a common language ; and all differences and quarrels between them over that language are suicidal to their common cause. Let us hope that the unfortunate jealousies which for so long a time separated the Keltic scholars of Scotland and Ireland are now cast into that oblivion which endeth not — " Oh, be Highland, Highlanders, and rally for the dear old tongue, Which, as ivy to a ruin, to the dear old land has clung ! Oh, snatch this relic from the wreck, the only and the last, To show...

Bibliografiske oplysninger