Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott, Bart, Bind 2

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Ticknor and Fields, 1861
 

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Side 293 - For talents mourn, untimely lost, When best employed and wanted most; Mourn genius high, and lore profound, And wit that loved to play, not wound ; And all the reasoning powers divine, To penetrate, resolve, combine ; And feelings keen, and fancy's glow, They sleep with him who sleeps below...
Side 40 - ... started in their stalls, stamped, and shook their bridles, the men arose and clashed their armour, and the mortal, terrified at the tumult he had excited, dropped the horn from his hand. A voice like that of a giant, louder even than the tumult around, pronounced these words ; — " Woe to the coward that ever he was born, That did not draw the sword before he blew the horn ! " A whirlwind expelled the horse-dealer from the cavern, the entrance to which he could never again find.
Side 274 - I humbly think that we may be excused from intrusting to them those places in the State where the influence of such a clergy, who act under the direction of a passive tool of our worst foe, is likely to be attended with the most fatal consequences. If a gentleman chooses to walk about with a couple of pounds of gunpowder in his pocket, if I give him the shelter of my roof, I may at least be permitted to exclude him from the seat next to the fire.
Side 39 - At the extremity of this extraordinary depot hung a sword and a horn, which the prophet pointed out to the horsedealer as containing the means of dissolving the spell. The man in confusion took the horn and attempted to wind it. The horses instantly started in their stalls, stamped, and shook their bridles, the men arose and clashed their armour, and the mortal, terrified at the tumult he had excited, dropped the horn from his hand. A voice like that of a giant, louder even than the tumult around,...
Side 128 - It was in the September of this year that Scott first saw Wordsworth. Their common acquaintance, Stoddart, had so often talked of them to each other, that they met as if they had not been strangers ; and they parted friends. Mr and Miss Wordsworth had just completed that tour in the Highlands, of which so many incidents have since been immortalized, both in the poet's verse and in the hardly less poetical prose of his sister's Diary. On the morning of the 17th of September, having left their carriage...
Side 53 - Scarba's isle, whose tortured shore Still rings to Corrievreken's roar, And lonely Colonsay; — Scenes sung by him who sings no more ! His bright and brief career is o'er, And mute his tuneful strains ; Quench'd is his lamp of varied lore, That loved the light of song to pour ; A distant and a deadly shore Has LEYDEN'S cold remains ! XII.
Side 129 - with that frank cordiality which, under whatever circumstances I afterwards met him, always marked his manners ; and, indeed, I found him then in every respect — except, perhaps, that his animal spirits were somewhat higher — precisely the same man that you knew him in later life ; the same lively, entertaining conversation, full of anecdote, and averse from...
Side 254 - Murray wrote to Constable on the 6th February 1 807, " truly sensible of the kind remembrance of me in your liberal purchase. You have rendered Mr. Miller no less happy by your admission of him ; and we both view it as honourable, profitable, and glorious to be concerned in the publication of a new poem by Walter Scott.
Side 205 - ... as he called them, in which literary men are so apt to indulge. Arrayed in his shooting-jacket, or whatever dress he meant to use till dinner-time, he was seated at his desk by six o'clock, all his papers arranged before him in the most accurate order, and his books of reference marshalled around him on the floor, while at least one favourite dog lay watching his eye just beyond the line of circumvallation.
Side 250 - tis no laughing matter; little by little, whatever your wishes may be, you will destroy and undermine, until nothing of what makes Scotland Scotland shall remain.

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