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Joint heirs and kinfolk, leagues of wave

Nor length of years can part us : Your right is ours to shrine and grave, The common freehold of the brave,

The gift of saints and martyrs. Our very sins and follies teach

Our kindred frail and human : We carp

at faults with bitter speech, The while for one unshared by each,

We have a score in common.

Will ye

We bowed the heart, if not the knee,

To England's Queen, God bless her ! We praised you when your slaves went free: We seek to unchain ours. Join hands with the oppressor

? And is it Christian England cheers

The bruiser, not the bruised ?
And must she run, despite the tears
And prayers of eighteen hundred years,

Amuck in Slavery's crusade ?
() black disgrace! O shame and loss

Too deep for tongue to phrase on! Tear from your flag its holy cross, And in your van of battle toss

The pirate's skull-bone blazon !

ASTRÆA AT THE CAPITOL.

ABOLITION OF SLAVERY IN THE DISTRICT or COLUMBIA, 1862. Wuen first I saw our banner wave

Above the nation's council-hall,

I heard beneath its marble wall
The clanking fetters of the slave!

In the foul market-place I stood,

And saw the Christian mother sold,

And childhood with its locks of gold, Blue-eyed and fair with Saxon blood.

I shut my eyes, I held my breath,

And, smothering down the wrath and shame

That set my Northern blood aflame, Stood silent—where to speak was death. Beside me gloomed the prison-cell

Where wasted one in slow decline

For uttering simple words of mine, And loving freedom all too well.

The flag that floated from the dome

Flapped menace in the morning air;
I stood a perilled stranger where
The human broker made his home.

For crime was virtue: Gown and Sword

And Law their threefold sanction gave,
And to the quarry of the slave
Went hawking with our symbol-bird.

On the oppressor's side was power;

And yet I knew that every wrong,

However old, however strong, But waited God's avenging hour.

I knew that truth would crush the lie,

Somehow, sometime, the end would be ;

Yet scarcely dared I hope to see The triumph with my mortal eye.

But now I see it! In the sun

A free flag floats from yonder dome,

And at the nation's hearth and home
The justice long delayed is done.
VOL. I.

21

Not as we hoped, in calm of prayer,

The message of deliverance comes,

But heralded by roll of drums On waves of battle-troubled air !

Midst sounds that madden and appall,

The song that Bethlehem's shepherds knew!

The harp of David melting through The demon-agonies of Saul!

Not as we hoped ;—but what are we?

Above our broken dreams and plans God lays, with wiser hand than man's, The corner-stones of liberty.

I cavil not with Him : the voice

That freedom's blessed gospel tells

Is sweet to me as silver bells, Rejoicing !-yea, I will rejoice!

Dear friends still toiling in the sun,

Ye dearer ones who, gone before, Are watching from the eternal shore The slow work by your hands begun,

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Rejoice with me! The chastening rod

Blossoms with love; the furnace heat

Grows cool beneath His blessed feet Whose form is as the Son of God!

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Rejoice! Our Marah's bitter springs

Are sweetened ; on our ground of grief
Rise day by day in strong relief
The prophecies of better things.
Rejoice in hope! The day and night

Are one with God, and one with them

Who see by faith the cloudy hem
Of Judgment fringed with Mercy's light !

THE BATTLE AUTUMN OF 1862.

The flags of war like storm-birds fly,

The charging trumpets blow;
Yet rolls no thunder in the sky,

No earthquake strives below.
And, calm and patient, Nature keeps

Her ancient promise well,
Though o'er her bloom and greenness sweeps

The battle's breath of hell.

And still she walks in golden hours

Through harvest-happy farms, And still

she wears her fruits and flowers Like jewels on her arms.

What mean the gladness of the plain,

This joy of eve and morn,
The mirth that shakes the beard of grain

And yellow locks of corn ?
Ah! eyes may well be full of tears,

And hearts with hate are bot;
But even-paced come round the years,

And Nature changes not.

She meets with smiles our bitter grief,

With songs our groans of pain ;
She mocks with tint of flower and leaf

The war-field's crimson stain.

Still, in the cannon's pause, we hear

Her sweet thanksgiving-psalm ; Too near to God for doubt or fear,

She shares th’ eternal calm.

She knows the seed lies safe below

The fires that blast and burn ;
For all the tears of blood we sow

She waits the rich return.

.

She sees with clearer eye than ours

The good of suffering born,-
The hearts that blossom like her flowers,

And ripen like her corn.
O, give to us, in times like these,

The vision of her eyes ;
And make her fields and fruited trees

Our golden prophecies !

O, give to us her finer ear!

Above this stormy din,
We too would hear the bells of cheer

Ring peace and freedom in!

MITHRIDATES AT CHIOS.42

Know'st thou, O slave-cursed land! How, when the Chian's

cup of guilt Was full to overflow, there came

God's justice in the sword of flame That, red with slaughter to its hilt, Blazed in the Cappadocian victor's hand ?

The heavens are still and far; But, not unheard of awful Jove,

The sighing of the island slave Was answered, when the Ægean wave The keels of Mithridates clove, And the vines shrivelled in the breath of war.

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