Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub
[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

PUBLIC PA PERS.

His Majcky's Speech to both Houses of Parliament, June 10, 1991, (64)

Tv. Speech of the Earl of Westmorland, Lord L cutenant of Ireiond, to buth

Houses of Parliament, May 5, 1791

(65)

Aldreis of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of

London, to the Duke of York, Dec. 19, 1791,

(66)

A liver to the same,

(ibid.)
Addref from the lame to the Duche/ of l'ork,

(ibid.)
Aulzver to the fame,

(ibid.)
Adress to his Maicky, from the High-Beili, Clergy, and other prin ipal

Inbabitants of the Town and Neighbourhood of Birmingham, (0)
The_4ddress of the Protesiant Diflenters of the lame Town,

(ibid.)
Proclama:ion for the Difiorvery of the Fubligh rs of a certain seditious Pater,

circula'eil on the 11th of July, in the Thaun of Birmin; han, (63)

Letter of Itu?ions froir M. Montmorin, Minister of France for Foreign

Affairs, jent by Order of the King', to all bis Ministers at Foreign Courts,

April 23,

(6)

The King's Proclamation on bis Departure from Paris, June 20 (71)

Addrifs on the forme Subject, from the National AJembly to the French Nation,

(-5)

The French Confiitution, as finally settled by the National Conflituent Afe.nbly,

and presented to the Kiny, Sept. 3, 171,

Letter from the King to the National Asembly, announcing his Resolution to

Accept the Conflitution, Sept. 13,

(102)

I be

The King's Speech to the National Asembly on accepting the Constitution,

Sept. 14, 1791,

(104)

The President's Answer,

(105)

Thu King's Speech to the National Assembly; the last Day of their Meeting

Sept. 30,

(ibid.)

The President's Answer,

(106)

His Majesty's Proclamation, Srpt. 30,

(ibid.).

Sprech to the New National Affembly, 02.7,

(108)
The President's Anfaer,

(100)
Melnge from the National Afembly to the King, No. 29,

(ibid.)
The King's Speech to the National A Tembly, Dec. 14,

(10)

The President's Anfwer, ,

(112)

Address from the National Alem?ly to the King, Dec. 16,

(ibid.)
I be Speech of George Washington, President of the United States of America,
i to both Houses of Congress, (Et. 25, :791,

(1.3)
Letters from Arthur Philip, Ediz. Governor of New South Wales, to Lord

Sydney, laid before the House of Commons, March 2, 1791, ( 17)

Supplies granted by Parliament for the Viar 1791,

(:26)

Principal Public Afts pased in the first Sejion of the seventeenth Pala-

ment of Great Britain,

(29)

Prices of Stock for the Year 1791,

(131)

Remarks on the Island of Hinzuan,

Defeription of Carnicobar and its inhabitants,

Account of the Empire of Bornou,

The presint State of Samar, and of its Inhabitant.,
Character of the Peasantry of Norway,

, Manners, and Cuftoms of ibe People of Morocco,

Account of a Cyprian Hunting Match,

[156]

[160]

[161]
[16]

The Hue and Cry,
Project for the Improvement of Theatrical Entertainments
Description of the Horrors of a Guilty Mind,
ole to Hope,
The Disappointment, a Rustic Tale,
Stanzas from the Ode for the 14th of July, 1791,
Tronlarinn of a Peom of Haller,
DOMESTIC LITERATURE, of the Year 1791,
FOREIGN LITERATURE, of the Year 1791,

[194] [195] 1196) [198]

(199) 1 (201)

[ibid] (2047 [276]

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors]

HE
great objects of

religion of

government, of na. val discovery, and of philosophical and medical knowledge, so far as they relate to the period now before us, we have already considered. These are the objects that come under the head of Science, more distinctly fo called ; and they undoubtedly sustain the first rank in the departments of literature. It is not, however, to matters of small consequence that our attention is now to be directed. Classical and polite learning, history, poetry, and the fine arts in general, present to us very interesting, as well as very pleasing subjects of contemplation. With the cultivation and improvement of them the honour and advantage both of individuals and of nations are closely connected. They cannot be properly and rationally studied with. out contributing, in an eminent degree, to enlarge the understanding, to captivate the fancy, to engage the affections, 1791.

and

[ocr errors]
« ForrigeFortsæt »