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THE WISDOM OF GOD IN THE FORMA

TION OF MAN.

lumny, shall, for the first offence, be cannot fail to be productive; and thus fined five shillings; for the second, ten shall thy vice, which hitherto has shillings; for the third, one pound; for done nothing but evil, contribute to the fourth, ten pounds, and be com- help the finances of the nation. pelled to go to church or chapel four Sincerely praying that this tax may successive Sundays, crowned with a take place, or that thy tongue may be paper cap, covered with painted figures blistered, and the organs of thy speech of tongues, with dark spots at their paralyzed, until the law of kindness be end, to indicate the poisoned state of written on thy heart, that member; for the fifth, fifty pounds, I remain, neighbour Calumnia, and to wear by way of ornament a Thy faithful reprover, large brass ring in the nose; and for

Zechariah ***** the sixth offence, to be proclaimed in

Dec. 15, 1819.

ABEDNEGO. corrigible, and marched off to their cousins on the mountains.

But should both these plans be rejected, I have yet another to propose, with which I shall conclude this Essay.

[Concluded from col. 18.] It is contained in an epistle addressed Having formed such a being, we to Calumnia by Zechariah *****. should begin to wish that we had proNeighbour Calumnia,

vided for its continuance ; for we shall I call thee neighbour, because to call perceive that its operations are atthee friend would be a perversion and tended with a waste of its component a prostitution of that sacred word. parts. How then shall we provide for Thou art morally incapable of friend its continuance ? ship, for thou art a compound of envy, Shall we make it attract particles of and deceit, and malice. Devoid of the same nature with itself, as mineexcellence thyself, thou canst not bear rals are supposed to increase? excellence in others, and therefore This could not be done, unless the thou maliciously endeavourest, by vile body were one mass of the same namisrepresentation, to reduce others to ture throughout: and such a body thy own inglorious level. The ali- would be totally unfit for motion or ment on which thou feedest, are the sensation. tears, and sighs, and groans, of those Shall we let it suck its nourishment victims who are daily immolated on by tubes fixed into the earth, as vegethine altar.

tables do? Such a structure will not To attempt to mend thee would, I allow the animal to seek pleasure and fear, be fruitless, for thou seemest to avoid pain; and it would be the hardened in thy sin, and therefore in-height of cruelty to place a sensible corrigible. What renders thy case being in such a situation. He would more hupeless is, that thou art a pro- be in the same unhappy state as poor fessor of Christianity, which teaches Polydorus, whose sufferings we have thee to love thy neighbour as thyself. all of us shuddered at. But between thy practice, and the doctrines, and precepts, and example, from these. We will place a bag of Him whom thou pretendest to serve, (which we will form chiefly of cellular there is not one point of resemblance; substance, with some muscular fibres and yet thou thinkest thyself a Chris- and some nerves) in the inside of the tian. Alas! thou art no more a Chris- body, which shall have the power of tian than the accuser of the brethren is reducing various substances sentinto it, a Christian. Neighbour Calumnia, let into a fluid of the same nature, wbich me deal faithfully with thee. Thou shall be fit, with some little further preart an offence to thy Creator, the curse paration, for the support of the body. of thy species, the sport of devils, the We will call this bag, the stomach. exécration of the church, and the We will provide this bag with some scum and scorn of the world.

tubular appendages of the same mateI have so little hope of thy amend- rials with itself, which we will call inment, that I do not waste exhortation testines. From these intestines numupon thee, but conclude by informing berless little vessels shall arise, which thee, that it is in my contemplation to shall suck up the nourishing fluid: but propose to friend Vansittart a tax on where shall they carry it? Calumny, which, so long as thou livest, Why, we will have near the middle

We must have something different

ingly versatile. She can even quote, families annihilated, and the social exactly the same words, and in the circle dissolved. Her breath is poivery order in which they were spoken, son, in which nothing can vegetate but and produce an effect directly op- suspicion, and jealousy, and maligposite to that which was produced nity, and envy, and malice, and all unby their original delivery. This she charitableness. does at one time, by stating that to Any one who should discover an have been seriously spoken, which was effectual specific for the exterminaspoken ironically; and at another, by tion of so dreadful an evil, would rank quoting as ironical that which was se- among the first benefactors of manrious. Sometimes by ascribing erro- kind, and stand entitled to a parlianeous opinions to a man for offering mentary reward, as much greater than arguments in their defence, when it that bestowed upon Dr. Jenner, for was impossible but she should know the discovery of vaccination, as the that he held no such opinions, but extermination of a moral is more imthat his arguments were intended to portant to the interests of society humble some conceited Tyro, who than that of a bodily disease. Moral poured contempt upon all who held remedies have long been tried, but in opinions contrary to his own. Pole- ten thousand cases in vain. I theremicus, one day hearing Tyro very dog-fore beg leave to suggest two plans to matically decide on a theological ques- the consideration of the public, and tion, which has divided the learned especially to the consideration of parand pious in every age, took the oppo- liament, which, if generally adopted, site side, and puzzled and silenced might do much towards curing the him. Calumnia was present, and soon evil; and should the evil, though not it was reported that Polemicus had entirely cured, be considerably dimideparted from the faith, and had be- nished or ameliorated, I hope that

parcome the zealous defender and propa- liament, in its wisdom, will not fail to gator of error. At other times she give Abednego a niche by the side of quotes correctly, but by an emphasis Dr. Jenner, and confer on him a grant upon a particular word, or by a parti- of, at least ten thousand a year, to be cular intonation of the voice, or a wink transmitted to his posterity to the of the eye, or a nod, or a shake of the fourth generation. head, she entirely changes the mean- I propose, first, that all incorrigible ing of the sentence, and the unsus- Defamers be immediately separated pečting speaker is made the author of from the other parts of society, and sentiments alike abhorrent to his feel- placed in remote situations, where ings and his principles. She also they shall not have

opportunity deals much in hints, in inuendos, and in seeing or hearing any thing of their broken sentences, such as— Well! I neighbours, and where their neighcould say something, but I forbear :- bours shall'hear nothing of them. The Who would have thought it!-But situations I would recommend are the one should not expect perfection:-1 tops of high hills, on which mud huts am very sorry, but I don't like to speak might be built. evil of any one.' Thus the work of Wrekin, and Malvern, and Cheviot, defamation is carried on, and thus and the Grampian, would form admirshe tarnishes the reputation of persons able establishments! And, to prevent of the highest intrinsic excellence. all verbal intercourse, I further pro

The mischiefs arising from defama- pose, that their provisions shall be retion are incalculable. It has been the gularly sent to them in a cart, driven precursor of every religious persecu- by a man both deaf and dumb. By tion. Good men have never been per- this means, defamation will be resecuted as good men, but have first moved from the abodes of the peacebeen vilified as bad, and then perse-ful, and be concentrated on these difcuted; they have been clothed in the ferent elevations, where skins of wild beasts, and then hunted to death. By defamation, the infernal

And Discord, with a thousand different mouths," traffic in human flesh, the Slave Trade, shall furnish some portion of their puwas, by the advocates of that trade, nishment. for a series of years, defended. By For such Defamers as are not yet defamation the peace of individuals considered incorrigible, I propose, sehas been destroyed, the harmony of condly, that all persons detected in ca

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TION OF MAN.

lumny, shall, for the first offence, be cannot fail to be productive; and thus fined five shillings; for the second, ten shall thy vice, which hitherto has shillings; for the third, one pound; for done nothing but evil, contribute to the fourth, ten pounds, and be com- help the finances of the nation. pelled to go to church or chapel four Sincerely praying that this tax may successive Sundays, crowned with a take place, or that thy tongue may be paper cap, covered with painted figures blistered, and the organs of thy speech of tongues, with dark spots at their paralyzed, until the law of kindness be end, to indicate the poisoned state of written on thy heart, that member; for the fifth, fifty pounds, I remain, neighbour Calumnia, and to wear by way of ornament a Thy faithful reprover, large brass ring in the nose; and for

Zechariah *****, the sixth offence, to be proclaimed in

Dec. 15, 1819.

ABEDNEGO. corrigible, and marched off to their cousins on the mountains. But should both these plans be re

THE WISDOM OF GOD IN THE FORMAjected, I have yet another to propose, with which I shall conclude this Essay.

[Concluded from col. 18.] It is contained in an epistle addressed Having formed such a being, we to Calumnia by Zechariah ***** should begin to wish that we had proNeighbour Calumnia,

vided for its continuance ; for we shall I call thee neighbour, because to call perceive that its operations are atthee friend would be a perversion and tended with a waste of its component a prostitution of that sacred word. parts. How then shall we provide for Thou art morally incapable of friend its continuance ? ship, for thou art a compound of envy, Shall we make it attract particles of and deceit, and malice. Devoid of the same nature with itself, as mineexcellence thyself, thou canst not bear rals are supposed to increase? excellence in others, and therefore This could not be done, unless the thou maliciously endeavourest, by vile body were one mass of the same namisrepresentation, to reduce others to ture throughout: and such a body thy own inglorious level. The ali- would be totally unfit for motion or ment on which thou feedest, are the sensation. tears, and sighs, and groans, of those Shall we let it suck its nourishment victims who are daily immolated on by tubes fixed into the earth, as vegethine altar.

tables do ? Such a structure will not To attempt to mend thee would, I allow the animal to seek pleasure and fear, be fruitless, for thou seemest to avoid pain ; and it would be the hardened in thy sin, and therefore in- height of cruelty to place a sensible corrigible. What renders thy case being in such a situation. He would more hupeless is, that thou art a pro- be in the same unhappy state as poor fessor of Christianity, which teaches Polydorus, whose sufferings we have thee to love thy neighbour as thyself. all of us shuddered at. But between thy practice, and the We must have something different doctrines, and precepts, and example, from these. We will place a bag of Him whom thou pretendest to serve, (which we will form chietly of cellular there is not one point of resemblance; substance, with some muscular fibres and yet thou thinkest thyself a Chris- and some nerves) in the inside of the tian. Alas! thou art no more a Chris- / body, which shall have the power of tian than the accuser of the brethren is reducing various substances sentinto it, a Christian. Neighbour Calumnia, let into a fluid of the same nature, wbich me deal faithfully with thee. Thou shall be fit, with some little further preart an offence to thy Creator, the curse paration, for the support of the body. of thy species, the sport of devils, the We will call this bag, the stomach. execration of the church, and the We will provide this bag with some scum and scorn of the world.

tubular appendages of the same mateI have so little hope of thy amend- rials with itself, which we will call inment, that I do not waste exhortation testines. From these intestines numupon thee, but conclude by informing berless little vessels shall arise, which thee, that it is in my contemplation to shall suck up the nourishing fluid: but propose to friend Vansittart a tax on where shall they carry it? Calumny, which, so long as thou livest, Why, we will have near the middle

rect.

of the body a roundish hollow muscle: the body, where it has received a we will call it the heart. It shall have fresh supply from the stomach; but pipes passing from it, which shall di- the old blood is altered in some of its vide into smaller ones, and go to every properties, and is utterly unfit for the part of the body. The little vessels purposes of life, until it has undergone rising from the intestines, which we the action of the air. will call lacteals, shall bring the nutri- How shall we contrive this,—we tive matter, and pour it into the heart. find that our single heart is insuffiThe heart shall contract, and send it cient. We must have as it were two through the pipes, to every part of the hearts :-one shall receive the blood in body. But before this can take place, the state just mentioned, and send it some previous process is required. into an apparatus where the air may The blood received from the stomach effect the necessary change in it—the must first pass through the lungs, for lungs. The other heart shall receive purposes which will be soon explained. the prepared blood from the lungs, But let us go on as we were going, and and send it for the purpose of nouour ideas will speedily become cor- rishment to every part of the body.

The first heart, we have said, shall Some of the matter sent by the receive the blood from every part of heart through the pipes, shall remain the body with the fluid of the absorbin every part of the body, and take on ents, and send it into an apparatus itself the nature and disposition of the for giving it air. This apparatus shall part to which it is applied.

be called the lungs. They shall be But as we have not used the whole bellows, and shall be formed of a of what came from the heart, we must number of vesicles, membranous bladprovide means of returning ; it and ders, which shall admit the air, and on this we will do by another set of pipes which the blood-vessels shall be spread, which we will call yeins, and which so that the air shall come in contact, or shall arise from every part of the body, nearly so, with the sides of the vessels ; shall unite into one or two large ones, which will be found sufficient to proand carry back the blood to the heart. duce the necessary change in it.

Now, parts of our body are constantly When this change has been effected, becoming effete and useless where veins shall receive the now perfect they are, but if we can carry them into blood from all the small arteries of the our circulating fluid, and modify them lungs, and carry it to the second heart, a little, they will perhaps again serve which contracting, shall send it anew some purpose ; and moreover, we will to every part of the body. have an apparatus for carrying such This is one circulation. This is the as are absolutely useless out of the cir- discovery of the immortal Harvey: culation, and out of the body altoge- after philosophers for many ages had ther,

been contented with absurd theories of To bring these parts into the circu- the motion of the blood, supposing it lation, we must have another set of like the flux and reflux of the tide, and vessels distinct from the veins, which so forth. Though we have formed two we will call absorbents. They shall take hearts to simplify the circulation, yet up particles of the body, and carry we will join them together, as their them towards the heart. They shall motions may go on at the same time: be of the same nature with the lacteal we will call the whole, the heart of the vessels, which rise from the intestines, animal; and the two hearts, the two and indeed shall be joined with them, sides of the heart. as they go towards the heart.

Let us impress it on our memories, We have then but one set of vessels that one side of the heart receives the going from the heart, the arteries, prepared blood from the lungs, and and two going towards it, the veins, sends it to nourish the body; and the and the absorbents, among which lat- other side receives the blood from all ter the lacteals are reckoned. But we parts of the body, and sends it to the need not have separate entrances in Iungs to be again prepared. the heart for the veins and absorb- Such are the general and easy noents ; the absorbents shall pour their tions which a person who would gain liquid into a vein near the heart. a knowledge of Physiology and Ana

We have now then brought our tomy should first fix in his mind. blood to the heart from every part of A frame of bone, to give figure,

TO THE EDITOR OF THE IMPERIAL

MAGAZINE,

strength, and points of attachment,

Agricultural Observations. and action for the moving powers, hollow, and full of oil, where such a structure is admissible ; its parts moveable by means of joints, which Sir,—The two following queries, with are two ends of bone tipped by carti- their answers, may probably be aclage, joined by ligament, and besmear- ceptable and useful to some of your ed with synovia, which synovia is se- Agricultural readers. creted, and prevented from escaping Why is Spade Husbandry preferby a membranous bag_fixed around able to the Plough ?—Reply. By the the ends of the bones. To move these tread of the horses, and the iron share bones, ropes called tendons are attach- of the plough, a hard bottom is formed, ed to them; and to these ropes mus- which holds water, and the seed covercular fibres are fixed, which shortening ed thereby rots. The hard track made themselves, draw the most moveable by the bottom of the ploughshare, imtowards the least moveable picce of pedes the growth of the seed, which the frame; the muscular fibres sub- cannot strike freely into the earth ; and servient to the will by means of nerves it is the law of nature, that if the root passing from the brain to them. cannot spread, the vegetable power

To unite the muscular fibres to cannot rise in any good proportion. each other, cellular substance is made When the spade is used, the ground use of, of which also membranes, is open; and the overplus water sinks blood vessels, great part of the sto- beneath the roots, which retain sufficimach and intestines, and of almost ent moisture for the use of vegetation, every soft part of the body, is formed. and the roots can, in the loose earth,

The muscles are not very sensible. expand in all directions, and thus But the body is surrounded by a very grow to perfection. sensible membrane, the skin ; exceed- Why is Drill Sowing preferable to ingly full of nerves, sent from it to the the Broadcast ?—Reply. By the Drill brain ; which give notice to the mind, all the seed is regularly covered with when any thing destructive to the a proper quantity of soil, and is kept body approaches.

in a proper state of preservation for Fat also is placed by way of cushion, growth. By the Broadcast, a part where motion is great; and is used to lies at the top, and is taken up by the fill up interstices, and make the sur- birds, or otherwise destroyed; another face of the body smooth and beau- part is but thinly covered, and is tiful.

thrown out by the frost, and lost or The support of the body is effected washed bare by the rains; another by a bag, the stomach, forming several part is trodden low by the feet of the sorts of food into a nutritious fluid. horses when harrowing, and cannot This fluid is taken up by absorbing rise; so that from these causes a convessels, opening into the appendages siderable part is actually lost. of the stomach, the intestines. These

Agricultural Hint. It is now well absorbents meet those coming from known, that plants not only draw every other part of the body, and all through their leaves some part of their joining together, pour their fluid into nourishment from the air, but the the blood, as it is returning to the leaves also perform the necessary heart,

work of altering the water received The heart sends it through arteries in at the roots, into the nature and to the lungs, where it is submitted to juices of the plant; and hence it is, the action of the air. Veins return it that the life of the plants depends so from the lungs to the other side of the immediately on their leaves. The heart, which sends it through arteries husbandman often suffers for want of to every part of the body: from this knowledge. A crop of saintfoin every part of the body veins receive is a very valuable thing, and its root it, and carry it back towards the heart, being perennial, will yield him inbeing joined in their way by the supply crease many years ; but it is often defrom the intestinal absorbents, toge- stroyed, at first, by suffering it to be ther with the fluid of the other absorb- indiscreetly fed upon by the sheep, ents of the body. The heart sends it which eating up all the leaves, the again to the lungs, to be again per- roots remain without the means of a fected.

supply of air, and the whole plant

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