The snow-storm; or, An account of the nature, properties, dangers and uses of snow [by C. Tomlinson].

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1845 - 116 sider
 

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Side 23 - Dig for the withered herb thro" heaps of snow. Now, shepherds to your helpless charge be kind, Baffle the raging year, and fill their pens With food at will ; lodge them below the storm, And watch them strict : for from the bellowing east, In this dire season, oft the whirlwind's wing Sweeps up the burden of whole wint'ry plains At one wide waft, and o'er the hapless flocks, Hid in the hollow of two neighbouring hills, The billowy tempest whelms ; till, upward, urg'd, The valley to a shining mountain...
Side 72 - When he supposes the hole to be nearly completed, he cautiously lifts his spear, to which the line has been previously attached, and as soon as the blowing of the seal is distinctly heard, and the ice consequently very thin, he drives it into him with the force of both arms, and then cuts away with his panna the remaining crust of ice, to enable him to repeat the wounds and get him out.
Side 113 - Already now the snow-drop dares appear, The first pale blossom of the unripened year ; As Flora's breath by some transforming power, Had chang'd an icicle into a flower ; Its name and hue the scentless plant retains, And winter lingers in its icy veins.
Side 12 - Tis brightness all; save where the new snow melts Along the mazy current. Low the woods Bow their hoar head; and, ere the languid sun Faint from the west emits his evening ray, Earth's universal face, deep-hid and chill, Is one wild dazzling waste, that buries wide The works of man.
Side 24 - His tufted cottage rising through the snow, He meets the roughness of the middle waste, Far from the track and blest abode of man; While round him night resistless closes fast, And every tempest, howling o'er his head, Renders the savage wilderness more wild.
Side 24 - Disaster'd stands ; sees other hills ascend, Of unknown joyless brow ; and other scenes, Of horrid prospect, shag the trackless plain : Nor finds the river, nor the forest, hid Beneath the formless wild ; but wanders on From hill to dale, still more and more astray ; Impatient flouncing through the drifted heaps, Stung with the thoughts of home ; the thoughts oflrtane Rush on his nerves, and call their vigour forth In many a vain attempt.
Side 23 - As thus the snows arise ; and, foul and fierce, All Winter drives along the darken'd air ; In his own loose-revolving fields, the swain Disaster'd stands ; sees other hills ascend, Of unknown joyless brow ; and other scenes, Of horrid prospect, shag the trackless plain : Nor finds the river, nor the forest, hid Beneath the formless wild ; but wanders on...
Side 26 - Still, however, we went on, and it grew darker and darker, till a heavy fall of snow, driven by a powerful wind, came sweeping along the desert track, directly in our teeth ; so that, what with general fatigue, and the unaccustomed position of the body in the snow-shoes, I hardly could bear up, and stand against it. The dreary howling of the tempest, over the wide waste of snow, rendered the scene even still more desolate ; and, with the unmitigated prospect before us...
Side 30 - ... immediately surrounding objects, diffused a deeper gloom over the farther recesses of the forest. And thus I remained without any inclination to sleep, till it was near midnight. A solemn impression, not to be called melancholy, weighed heavily upon me. The satisfaction with which I regarded the fatigue which had gone by, was hardly sufficient to inspire confidence as to what was to come ; and this reflection it was, perhaps, that gave a colour to my thoughts at once serious and pleasing. Distant...
Side 29 - I had deferred the use of my buffalo skin till I lay down to sleep, and were it not for the volumes of smoke with which I was at times disturbed* and the pieces of fire which burnt holes in my clothes wherever they happened to fall, my lodging would have been, under circumstances, truly agreeable. I sat for some time...

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