The Story of Ireland: A Narrative of Irish History from the Earliest Ages to the Insurrection of 1867, Written for the Youth of Ireland

Forsideomslag
P. J. Kenedy, 1892 - 657 sider
 

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Indhold

The Golden Age of PreChristian Erinn
38
The death of King Dahi
42
How Ireland received the Christian Faith
45
Chapter Page
46
A retrospective glance at pagan Ireland
51
St Columba led blindfolded into the Convention
55
Chapter Page
63
The Danes in Ireland
74
The murder of King Mahon
78
Chapter Page
83
How a dark thundercloud gathered over Ireland
85
The glorious day of Clontarf
89
After the Battle The scene upon Ossorys plain The last days of national freedom
99
How England became a compact kingdom while Ireland was breaking into fragments
103
How Henry the Second feigned wondrous anxiety to heal the disorders of Ireland
106
The treason of Diarmid MMurrogh
108
The Norman landing
112
How Herry recalled the adventurers How he came over himself to punish them and befriend the Irish
121
How Henry made a treaty with the Irish kingand did not keep it
127
The Deathbed of King Henry the Second
132
How the AngloNorman colony fared
135
The bier that conquered The story of Godfrey of Tyrconnell
140
Godfrey of Tyrconnell borne into battle
145
How the Irish nation awoke from its trance and Aung off its chains The career of King Edward Bruce
150
How this bright day of independence was turned to gloom How the seasons fought against Ireland and famine fought for England
156
Mac Murrough warned of the plot by his Bard
169
How the vainglorious English king tried another campaign against
177
How a new element of antagonism came into the struggle How
184
The rebellion of Silken Thomas
196
Tbe Reformers at their work
207
Edward Mary and Elizabeth The career
216
Hugh of Dungannon How Queen Elizabeth brought up the young
235
Stealing nway the Tyrconnell princes
238
How Hugh of Dungannon was meantime drawing off from England
246
The Flight of the Earls
327
The Princes received by the Pope
337
How the lords justices got up the needful bloody fury in England
352
Something about the conflicting elements of the civil war in 16429
360
Authentic portrait of Owen Roe ONeill
361
Depositing the captured English Standards in Limerick Cathedral
370
ists and the Confederates concluded an honorable peace
377
The agony of a nation
383
How King Charles the Second came back on a compromise How a
394
Battle of the Boyne
410
fields midnight ridethe fate of Williams siege train
426
How the French sailed off and the deserted Irish army starved in rags
439
How they kept the bridge at Athlone
447
The Culloden of Ireland How Aughrim was fought and lost
451
How glorious Limerick once more braved the ordeal How at length
462
How the treaty of Limerick was broken and trampled under foot by
469
How Ireland began to awaken from the sleep of slavery The dawn
488
What national independence accomplished for Ireland How England
501
How the British minister forced on the rising The fate of the brave
509
The capture of Lord Edward Fitzgerald
515
How the government conspiracy now achieved its purpose How
520
Ireland after the Union The story of Robert Emmet
531
How the Irish people next sought to achieve the restoration of their
546
How the Irish exodus came about and the English press gloated over
560
A scene from the Irish exodus
561
How some Irishmen took to the politics of despair How Englands
566
The unfinished chapter of eighteen hundred and sixtyseven
574
Valedictory
581
Revival of Parliamentary agitation in Ireland The demand
593
How Irishmen of opposite opinions combined at last in their coun
602
Obstruction Men and methods that worried the House of Commons
615
Decline of the Land League No Rent Dynamite and the dagger
632
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Side 488 - Britain ; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, had, hath, and of right ought to have, full Power and Authority to make Laws and Statutes of sufficient Force and Validity to bind the Colonies and People of America, Subjects of the Crown of Great Britain, in all cases whatsoever.
Side 65 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among the ruins of lona.
Side 482 - De Barri's wood, the British soldiers burst, The French artillery drove them back, diminished and dispersed. The bloody Duke of Cumberland beheld with anxious eye, And ordered up his last reserve, his latest chance to try. On Fontenoy, on Fontenoy, how fast his generals ride! And mustering come his chosen troops, like clouds at eventide. Six thousand English veterans...
Side 458 - Far dearer the grave or the prison, Illumed by one patriot name, Than the trophies of all, who have risen On Liberty's ruins to fame.
Side 643 - I have nothing to say that can alter your predetermination, nor that it will become me to say with any view to the mitigation of that sentence which you are here to pronounce and I must abide by.
Side 482 - King Louis madly cried: To death they rush, but rude their shock — not unavenged they died. On through the camp the column trod — King Louis turns his rein: "Not yet, my liege...

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