So Damn Much Money: The Triumph of Lobbying and the Corrosion of American Government

Forsideomslag
Vintage Books, 2010 - 406 sider
2 Anmeldelser
Anmeldelserne verificeres ikke af Google, men Google tjekker indholdet og fjerner det, hvis det er falsk.
With a New Foreword

In So Damn Much Money, veteran Washington Post editor and correspondent Robert Kaiser gives a detailed account of how the boom in political lobbying since the 1970s has shaped American politics by empowering special interests, undermining effective legislation, and discouraging the country's best citizens from serving in office. Kaiser traces this dramatic change in our political system through the colorful story of Gerald S. J. Cassidy, one of Washington's most successful lobbyists. Superbly told, it's an illuminating dissection of a political system badly in need of reform.

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Anmeldelserne verificeres ikke af Google, men Google tjekker indholdet og fjerner det, hvis det er falsk.

LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - traumleben - LibraryThing

If you're anything of an idealist about the American system of government, this book might just break your heart. Not to say that our government is irretrievably flawed, but it's been significantly ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - EricAbrahamson - LibraryThing

Over the last thirty years lobbying has become a $4 billion industry in Washington, DC. Focusing on the story of Gerald Cassidy, one of the most successful early players in the business, Kaiser looks ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Om forfatteren (2010)

ROBERT G. KAISER has been with The Washington Post since 1963. He has reported on the House and Senate; was a correspondent in Saigon and Moscow; served as national editor, then managing editor; and is now associate editor and senior correspondent. He has also written for Esquire, Foreign Affairs, and The New York Review of Books. His books include Russia: The People and the Power; So Damn Much Money; and, with Leonard Downie Jr., The News About the News. He has received an Overseas Press Club award and a National Press Club award, and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. He has also been a commentator on NPR's All Things Considered. He lives in Washington, D.C.

Bibliografiske oplysninger