The Pastor's Gift to the Pupils of the Bulfinch Street Sunday School: January 1, 1849

Forsideomslag
Benjamin H. Greene, 1849 - 80 sider

Fra bogen

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 17 - I remember, I remember Where I was used to swing, And thought the air must rush as fresh To swallows on the wing; My spirit flew in feathers then That is so heavy now, And summer pools could hardly cool The fever on my brow.
Side 16 - I REMEMBER, I REMEMBER. I REMEMBER, I remember The house where I was born, The little window where the sun Came peeping in at morn : He never came a wink too soon, Nor brought too long a day, But now I often wish the night Had borne my breath away...
Side 17 - ... remember Where I was used to swing, And thought the air must rush as fresh To swallows on the wing; My spirit flew in feathers then That is so heavy now, And summer pools could hardly cool The fever on my brow. I remember, I remember The...
Side 48 - When the woes of life o'ertake me, Hopes deceive, and fears annoy, Never shall the cross forsake me; Lo, it glows with peace and joy.
Side 59 - How bright the unchanging morn appears! Farewell, inconstant world, farewell ! 5 Life's labor done, as sinks the clay, Light from its load the spirit flies, While heaven and earth combine to say, " How blest the righteous when he dies !
Side 33 - They lift their dewy buds and bells, In garden, mead, and field: — They lurk in every sunless path, Where forest children tread; — They dot, like stars, the sacred turf, Which lies above the dead. They sport with every playful wind, That stirs the blooming trees, And laugh on every fragrant bush, All full of toiling bees : — From the green marge of lake and stream, Fresh vale, and mountain sod, They look in gentle glory forth — The pure sweet flowers of God.
Side 35 - It is not much the world can give, With all its subtle art, And gold and gems are not the things To satisfy the heart ; But, oh ! if those who cluster round The altar and the hearth, Have gentle words, and loving smiles, How beautiful is earth.
Side 11 - ... the remotest curmudgeon among them all. From the arrangement of the seats in the nave, and the labels pasted or painted on them, I judged that the women sat on one side and the men on the other, and the seats for various orders of magistrates, and for ecclesiastical and collegiate people, were likewise marked out.
Side 14 - WHEN to the house of GOD we go, To hear his word, and sing his love, We ought to worship him below, As saints and angels do above.
Side 61 - LIKE snow that falls where waters glide, Earth's pleasures fade away ; They melt in time's destroying tide, And cold are while they stay ; But joys that from religion flow, Like stars that gild the night, Amid the darkest gloom of woe, Shine forth with sweetest light.

Bibliografiske oplysninger