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Zikvávia LUXURIOUS SHOES FOR WOMEN.
Duris, Hist. ap. Ath. 4. 155 C.
σκυλοδεψεῖν TO TAN HIDES.
Ar. Plut. 514.
σκυλοδέψης TANNER.

Ar. Av. 490, Eccl. 420. σκυλόδεψος = TANNER.

Dem. in Aristog. I. 38 (Or. 25). σKUTEĴOV = COBBLER'S SHOP, SHOE-SHOP. Teles, ap. Stob. Flor. 95. 21.

σKUTEÚELV = TO WORK LEATHER, TO COBBLE.

Xen. Mem. 4. 2. 22.

σκυτεύς

= SHOEMAKER, COBBLER.

Hipp. De Morb. Vulg. 5. 1153 D; Xen. Mem. 1. 2. 37; 4. 4. 5; Plato, Gorg. 491 A; Rep. 10. 601 C; Ar. Av. 491; Teles, ap. Stob. Flor. 95. 21; Arist. Eth. Nic. 1. 6. p. 1097b. 29; Eth. Eud. 2. 1. p. 1219a. 23; Pol. 2. 1. p. 1261a. 36; De Soph. Elench. 1776. 14; De Interpr. 20b. 35. σκύτευσις = SCIENCE OF SHOEMAKING.

Ar. Eth. Eud. 2. 1. p. 1219a. 23.

σκυτικός

= PERTAINING TO SHOES OR SHOEMAKING.

De Artic. 820 C; D; Plato, Alcib. I. 128 C; E; Theaet. 146 D; 147 B; Charm. 174 C; Rep. 2. 374 B; 5. 456 D; Arist. Eth. Eud. 2. 1. p. 1219a. 23; Problem. 30. 8. p. 956b. 4.

σκυτοδεψεῖν =TO TAN HIDES, TO DRESS LEATHER.

Pollux, 7. 81.

σκυτοδέψης TANNER.

Theophr. Char. 16; H. P. 3. 18. 5.

σκυτοδεψικός = PERTAINING TO TANNING OR TANNERS. Theophr. C. P. 3. 17. 5 (bis); 5. 15. 2.

σκυτόδεψος = TANNER.

σκῦτος

Plato, Gorg. 517 E.

= HIDE, OR SKIN.

Xen. De Re Equest. 12. 10; Ar. Eq. 868; Plato, Charm. 173 D; Sympos. 191 A; Arist. Eth. Nic. 1. 11. p. 1101a. 4; Pol. 4. 4. p. 1291a. 19. σKUTOTOμeîv = TO CUT LEATHER, BE A SHOEMAKER.

Ar. Plut. 162; 514; Plato, Alcib. I. 129 D; Charm. 161 E; 163 B; Hipp. Min. 368 C; Rep. 4. 443 C; 5. 454 C; Arist. Pol. 2. 11. p. 12736. 12. σκυτοτομεῖον SHOEMAKER'S SHOP.

Lysias, Or. 24. 20.

σKUTOTOμlα = ART OF SHOEMAKING.

Plato, Rep. 3. 397 E; 10. 601 A; B. σκυτοτομικός = PERTAINING TO SHOEMAKING.

Ar. Eccl. 432; Plato, Theaet. 146 C; D; Polit. 180 C; 288 E; Rep. 1. 333 A; 4. 443 C; Aesch. in Tim. 97; Arist. De Soph. El. 32. p. 184a. 4; Eth. Eud. 2. I. p. 1219a. 23.

σκυτοτόμος

Ar. Ran. 819.

SHOEMAKER'S STRAIGHT-EDGE CUTTING-KNIFE.
Plato, Alcib. I. 129 C.

SHOEMAKER.

Xen. Hell. 3. 4. 17; Ages. 1. 26; Cyrop. 6. 2. 37; Ar. Eq. 740; Lys. 414; 416; Eccl. 385; Plato, Alcib. I. 129 C; D; Theaet. 180 D; Sympos. 191 A; 221 E; Protag. 319 D; 324 C; Rep. 2. 370 D; E; 3. 397 E; 4. 434 A; 443 C; 5. 456 D; 466 B; 10. 601 A; C; Gorg. 447 D; 490 D; 491 A; 517 E; Arist. Pol. 4. 4. 1295a. 13; Eth. Nic. 5. 8. p. 1133a. 5; 19; 24; 32; 33; 9. 16. p. 1163b. 34; Eth. Eud. 3. 10. 12436. 31; Pol. 2. 1. 1261a. 36; Theophr. H. P. 5. 5. I; Ameips. Conn. ap. Diog. Laert. 2. 28 (Kock, I, 672. 9).

σμιλεύματα = LEATHER-FINDINGS.

σμίλη

σπογγίζειν = TO CLEAN, OR POLISH, OF SHOES. Stratonic. ap. Ath. 8. 351 A.

σπόγγος

= SPONGE, TO POLISH SHOES.

Crates, Ther. ap. Ath. 6. 268 A (Kock, I, 134. 15). opóyyos foregoing.

Ar. Vesp. 600.

σχίζειν = TO CUT OUT SOLES (?).

Xen. Cyrop. 8. 2. 5.

σχισταί = UNKNOWN SHOES (= 'Apуeîαι [?]).

Eupol. Phil. (Kock, I, 331. 266).

τομεύς

SHOEMAKER'S HALF-MOON CUTTER.

Plato, Alcib. I. 129 C.

Τυῤῥηνικόν = SANDAL WITH RECTANGULAR SOLE OF WOOD.
Poll. 7. 86; 92 (Cratin. Nom. Kock, I, 54. 131).

ὑποδεῖσθαι = TO PUT ON SHOES.

Herod. 1. 155; Thuc. 3. 22; Xen. De Rep. Lac. 2. 3; Ar. Eccl. 269; Plato, Charm. 174 C; Sympos. 174 A; 220 B; Rep. 2. 372 A; Gorg. 490 D; Arist. Hist. Anim. 2. 1. p. 499a. 29; De Part. Anim. 4. 10. p. 687a. 28; frag. p. 1486b. 22; Duris, ap. Ath. 4. 155 C; Menand. Deisid. ap. Clem. Alex. Strom. 7. 4. 24 (Kock, III, 33. 109).

ὑπόδημα = SHOE, IN GENERAL.

Hipp. De Artic. 828 C; D; Herod. 1. 195; Xen. Anab. 4. 5. 14; Cyrop. 8. I. 4I; 8. 2. 5; Rep. Lac. 2. 3; De Re Equest. I2. IO; Mem. I. 6. 6; Xen. Oec. 8. 19; 9. 6; 10. 2; 13. 10; Lysias, in Diog. 20; Ar. Thesm. 262; Plut. 985; 1012; frag. ap. Suidas (Kock, I, 593. 914); Strattis, Lemn. ap. Harpocr. p. 265 (Kock, I, 718. 24); Hermipp. Demot. ap. Poll. 7. 89 (Kock, I, 229. 18); Plato, Com. Zeus Kak. ap. Ath. 15. p. 677 A (Kock, I, 614. 51); Plato, Phaed. 64 D; Meno. 91 D; E; Theaet. 146 D; 147 B; Legg. 12. 942 E; Charm. 161 E; Hipp. Maj. 294 A; Hipp. Min. 368 C; Alcib. I. 128 A; B; C; E; Rep. 1. 333 A; 2. 372 A; Gorg. 447 D; 490 D; Arist. De Soph. El. 32. p. 184a. 4; De Anim. Gen. 1. 18. p.

7236. 31; Probl. 30. 8. p. 956b. 4; Eth. Nic. I. II. p. 1101a. 4; 5. 8. p. 1133a. 19; 24; b. 5; 9. 16. p. 1163b. 34; Eth. Eud. 2. 1. p. 1219a. 23; Rhet. 2. 19. p. 1392a. 32 (bis); Pol. 1. 9. p. 1257a. 4; Theophr. Char. 2; 4; Dicaearch. Descr. Graec. 19 (Müller, Hist. Minor. I. p. 103); Aristocles, ap. Ath. 14. 621 B; Teles ap. Stob. Flor. 97. 31; Poll. 7. 82. vπоdημáτιov = dim. of foregoing, q.v.

Hipp. De Artic. 828 C.

φέλλος = CORK, CORK-SOLE.

Alexis, Isost. ap. Ath. 13. p. 568 A (Kock, II, 329. 98. 7). χιτών = UPPER OF A SHOE (?).

Xen. Cyrop. 8. 2. 5; Ar. Rhet. 2. 19. p. 1392a. 32.

THE ATTIC PROMETHEUS.

In the second episode of the Prometheus of Aeschylus (vv. 439506) the hero recounts for the benefit of the Oceanids his services to mortals, and even to the gods. So vehement is he in his declaration of what both owe to him as their benefactor, that one is led to suspect that the poet, who on one occasion appears to have dared to divulge even some secrets of the Eleusinian mysteries (Aristot. Eth. Nic. iii. 2), undertakes in this place also to set before his hearers some of the teachings which pertained to the worship of Prometheus Tuppópos1 in the Academy. In three distinct places Prometheus is made to assert his claim to the invention of certain benefits to the gods, and particularly to mankind, as against other possible claimants:

439-440.

By C. B. GULICK.

καίτοι θεοῖσι τοῖς νέοις τούτοις γέρα
τίς ἄλλος ἢ ἐγὼ παντελῶς διώρισεν;
467-468. θαλασσόπλαγκτα δ ̓ οὔτις ἄλλος ἀντ ̓ ἐμοῦ
λινόπτερ ̓ ηὗρε ναυτίλων ὀχήματα.
ἔνερθε δὲ χθονὸς
κεκρυμμέν ̓ ἀνθρώποισιν ὠφελήματα,
χαλκόν, σίδηρον, ἄργυρον, χρυσόν τε τίς
φήσειεν ἂν πάροιθεν ἐξευρεῖν ἐμοῦ;
οὐδείς, σάφ ̓ οἶδα, μὴ μάτην φλύσαι θέλων.

500-504.

1 Paus. i. 30, 2. That his title as a god in Athens was Προμηθεὺς πυρφόρος is inferred from Soph. Oed. Col. 55 f., d πuppópos leds Tɩràv Пpoμnleús, and Schol. This is probably a safe inference, though no inscriptions give it, nor is it mentioned by Eur. Phoen. 1122 or Paus. .c. It is the founding of this cult which was celebrated in the IIpoμneeds πuρpóрos of Aeschylus, the last play of the Promethean trilogy. Westphal, Prolegg. zu Aeschylos' Tragödien, pp. 220 ff., Wecklein, Aeschylos' Prometheus3, p. 20. The piece bears the same relation to the Prometheia as the Eumenides to the Oresteia. Cf. von Christ, Griech. Litt.”, p. 184.

We are so accustomed take our facts about religion and mythology from Attic writers that we are apt to accept them as true for all Greece, and to regard these words of Prometheus as representing the faith of Thebans, Argives, and Corinthians, as well as of Athenians. But the polemical note in the last verse quoted (504) is unmistakable, and, as a matter of fact, the antagonism of his claim to that of the heroes of civilization in other Greek communities is remarkable.

In examining the extent of this divergence in belief, we need not take account of the stealing of fire. That was a deed ascribed to Prometheus by nearly all Greeks, the most notable exception being the Argives, who assigned the gift of fire to Phoroneus; Paus. ii. 19, 5: ἑξῆς δὲ τῆς εἰκόνος [sc. Βίτωνος] ταύτης πῦρ καίουσιν, ὀνομάζοντες Φορωνέως εἶναι· οὐ γάρ τι ὁμολογοῦσι δοῦναι πῦρ Προμηθέα ἀνθρώποις, ἀλλὰ ἐς Φορωνέα τοῦ πυρὸς μετάγειν ἐθέλουσι τὴν εὕρεσιν. The Athenians derived their belief from Hesiodic tradition,' and the gift of fire is mentioned several times in the play. But it is noteworthy that it receives no mention in the passage included in 439–506, which, as I have suggested, contains a doctrinal exposition, and in the Attic cult the word uppópos means not 'fire-stealer,' but 'fire-bearer,' in reference to the torch races held at the Prometheia.2

The gifts, then, on which the Attic Prometheus insists as his own contributions to civilization are:

1. House-building, 450-453.

This is not actually stated, but the implication is clear:

κοὔτε πλινθυφεῖς

δόμους προσείλους ᾖσαν, οὐ ξυλουργίαν·
κατώρυχες δ ̓ ἔναιον ὥστ ̓ ἀήσυροι

μύρμηκες ἄντρων ἐν μυχοῖς ἀνηλίοις.

1 In other respects disregarded by Aeschylus. Wecklein, ibid. p. 14. The Hesiodic Theogony contains nothing, with the possible exception of the myth of Cephalus, which can be accounted peculiarly Attic. Gruppe, Culte und Mythen, р. боб.

2 Eur. Phoen. 1121 f.:

Westphal, p. 220.

δεξιᾷ δὲ λαμπάδα Τιτὰν Προμηθεὺς ἔφερεν ὣς πρήσων πόλιν.

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