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WOMAN'S MISSION TO WOMEN.

What does the Female Mission to the Fallen Do ? I T sends earnest Christian women into the Streets, the Hospitals, and the Work

houses, seeking to converse with and rescue the fallen of their own sex.

There are ten Mission houses; and twenty-five agents are working in different parts of London.

There is accommodation for one hundred young women, who receive temporary shelter, under the care of the Missionaries, until permanent provision can be made. Many are mere girls from the country, lured to London by the prospect of high wages and little work.

In the case of young women found in dangerous circumstances, but not yet fallen, å home is provided, when possible, in the service of Christian mistresses. Ladies willing to assist the Committee in this matter will greatly oblige by communicating with the Secretary. The Missionaries have placed 5,652 in service during the last twenty-five years.

5,729 have been placed in Institutions for training.

1,567 have been restored to their friends. The scenes that have been witnessed of parents meeting with their long-lost daughters have frequently been most touching.

Seventy-two have been assisted to marry.

Fifty-four have been emigrated, many of whom have written to express their gratitude for the help that enabled them to escape from the evil companions by whom they were previously surrounded.

Many others have been placed in hospitals, or otherwise temporarily assisted.

In the streets of London tracts are distributed bearing the Missionaries' names and addresses, with an invitation to come to them for advice or help; and thus wandering girls are made acquainted with the name of a friend who is ready and willing to help them to forsake their evil life, and lead them to the Saviour.

No penitent woman is ever refused assistance.

The magistrates at the Metropolitan Police Courts avail themselves of the help of the Mission in dealing with cases of attempted suicide. Eight such cases were during the past year handed over to the Missionary specially appointed for this purpose.

Only female agents are employed, it being regarded as essentially the work of Christian women to seek and rescue their fallen sisters.

Each case aided has cost on an average £3 8s. 11d.
The Mission helps and shelters about 1,000 young women every year.

The annual expenditure is about £4,101. The income from annual subscriptions is £1,377, so that the Committee are dependent upon donations to the extent of $2,724.

Further particulars of the work of the Mission may be obtained at the Office.
Contributions will be thankfully received by
The PRESIDENT, The EARL OF SHAFTESBURY, K.G.

The HONORARY SECRETARY, W. T. PATON, Esq.
The BANKERS, Messrs. PRESCOTT & CO., 62, Threadneedle Street,

OR BY

ARTHUR J. S. MADDISON, SECRETARY.

Office-32, CHARING CROSS, S.W.

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WOMAN'S MISSION TO WOMEN.

What does the Female Mission to the Fallen Do ? I , T sends earnest Christian women into the Streets, the Hospitals, and the Work

There are ten Mission houses ; and twenty-five agents are working in different parts of London.

There is accommodation for one hundred young women, who receive temporary shelter, under the care of the Missionaries, until permanent provision can be made. Many are mere girls from the country, lured to London by the prospect of high wages and little work.

In the case of young women found in dangerous circumstances, but not yet fallen, a home is provided, when possible, in the service of Christian mistresses. Ladies willing to assist the Committee in this matter will greatly oblige by communicating with the Secretary. The Missionaries have placed 5,652' in service during the last twenty-five years.

5,729 have been placed in Institutions for training.

1,567 have been restored to their friends. The scenes that have been witnessed of parents meeting with their long-lost daughters have frequently been most touching.

Seventy-two have been assisted to marry.

Fifty-four have been emigrated, many of whom have written to express their gratitude for the help that enabled them to escape from the evil companions by whom they were previously surrounded.

Many others have been placed in hospitals, or otherwise temporarily assisted.

In the streets of London tracts are distributed bearing the Missionaries' names and addresses, with an invitation to come to them for advice or help; and thus wandering girls are made acquainted with the name of a friend who is ready and willing to help them to forsake their evil life, and lead them to the Saviour.

No penitent woman is ever refused assistance.

The magistrates at the Metropolitan Police Courts avail themselves of the help of the Mission in dealing with cases of attempted suicide. Eight such cases were during the past year handed over to the Missionary specially appointed for this purpose.

Only female agents are employed, it being regarded as essentially the work of Christian women to seek and rescue their fallen sisters.

Each case aided has cost on an average £3 8s. 11d.
The Mission helps and shelters about 1,000 young women every year.

The annual expenditure is about £4,101. The income from annual subscriptions is £1,377, so that the Committee are dependent upon donations to the extent of £2,724.

Further particulars of the work of the Mission may be obtained at the Office.
Contributions will be thankfully received by
The PRESIDENT, The EARL OF SHAFTESBURY, K.G.

The HONORARY SECRETARY, W. T. PATON, Esq.
The BANKERS, Messrs. PRESCOTT & CO., 62, Threadneedle Street,

OR BY

ARTHUR J. S. MADDISON, SECRETARY.

Office-32, CHARING CROSS,

S.W.

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“ The Thames Church Mission is a vigorous and important agency for practically obeying the text which it takes as its motto: Cast thy bread upon the waters : for thou shalt find it after many days.' It is, in fact, one of those valuable Home Societies which enable the British and Foreign Bible Society to put the Scriptures into wider circulation, just as the great Missionary Societies do abroad.”

British and Foreign Bible Society Monthly Reporter. I do not know any agency in which the Religious Tract Society feels more confidence than in the Thames Church Mission. Some of the most interesting results of the distribution of their tracts are found in connection with the Mission. When by God's mercy a sailor is brought to the knowledge of the truth, and becomes an active servant of the Lord Jesus Christ, the blessing is not confined to himself, for he becomes the centre of a great and precious influence, operating probably where the Gospel message would not otherwise be heard.”—Rev. L. B. WHITE, D.D.

“For moral purposes, for patriotic purposes, for social purposes, for religious purposes, there was never devised a better agency than the Thames Church Mission, and it ought not to want the means which are necessary to extend its operations. I shall be happy to do anything in my power to promote the extension of an agency which has been so signally blessed by God, and is so immensely beneficial to the whole community.”—Rt. Hon. Earl of SHAFTESBURY, K.G. OFFICE: 31, NEW BRIDGE STREET, LUDGATE CIRCUS, E.C.

E. J. MATHER, Secretary.

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48, PATERNOSTER ROW.

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