A Key to Hiley's Practical English Composition, Del 1

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Side 36 - Ye winds, that have made me your sport, Convey to this desolate shore Some cordial endearing report Of a land I shall visit no more. My friends, do they now and then send A wish or a thought after me ? O tell me I yet have a friend, Though a friend I am never to see.
Side 36 - Better dwell in the midst of alarms, Than reign in this horrible place. 1 am out of humanity's reach, I must finish my journey alone, Never hear the sweet music of speech, — I start at the sound of my own. The beasts that roam over the plain My form with indifference see, They are so unacquainted with man, Their tameness is shocking to me.
Side 35 - To purchase Heaven has gold the power ? Can gold remove the mortal hour ? In life can love be bought with gold ? Are friendship's pleasures to be sold ? No — all that's worth a wish — a thought, Fair virtue gives unbrib'd, unbought.
Side 40 - If the Spring put forth no blossoms, in Summer there will be no beauty, and in Autumn, no fruit. So, if youth be trifled away without improvement, manhood will be contemptible, and old age, miserable.
Side 108 - ... that we opened our sacks, and, behold, every man's money was in the mouth of his sack, our money in full weight: and we have brought it again in our hand. And other money have we brought down in our hands to buy food: we cannot tell who put our money in our sacks. And he said, Peace be to you, fear not: your God, and the God of your father, hath given you treasure in your sacks: I had your money.
Side 37 - If we delay till to-morrow what ought to be done to-day, we overcharge the morrow with a burden which belongs not to it.
Side 40 - In that unaffected civility which springs from a gentle mind, there is an incomparable charm. They who raise envy, will easily incur censure. Many of the evils which occasion our complaints of the world, are wholly imaginary.
Side 53 - Boast not thyself of to-morrow; for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth.
Side 41 - As there is a worldly happiness which God perceives to be no other than disguised misery as there are worldly honours which in his estimation are reproach so there is a worldly wisdom which in his sight is foolishness.
Side 51 - Happy moments indeed there sometimes are in the lives of pious men, when, sequestered from worldly cares, and borne up on the wings of divine contemplation, they rise to a near and transporting view of immortal glory. But such efforts of the mind are rare, and cannot be long supported.

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