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CLARK'S GRAMMAR:

IN WHICA

THE ANALYSES OF THE SENTENCES

IN THE GRAMMAR

ARE INDICATED BY

DIAGRAMS.
Stephen Welark.

NEW YORK :

PUBLISHED BY A. S. BARNES & BURR,

51 & 53 JOHN-STREET.

1863.

593597

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1959,

By 8. W. CLARK, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States

for the Northern District of New York.

STATEMENT.

The author of CLARK'S GRAMMAR is in the almost daily receipt of letters from teachers in different parts of the country, requesting the solution, in Diagrams, of some of the more intricate sentences in the Grammar.

TEACHERS educated in the old systems and methods, very naturally find themselves embarrassed in some of their first attempts at instruction in this. Besides, DIAGRAMS, serving as they do to dissipate the vagueness and mysticisms of the old methods, require the teacher as well as the pupil to "define his position" on all questions of analysis. Thought is thus aroused, discussions and often disputes started, and, as a very natural consequence, appeals are made to the author.

To make this personal correspondence more general, and in compliance with the requests of many teachers, this Key is prepared, and is respectfully submitted to teachers by their co-laborer,

THE AUTHOR. CORTLAND ACADEMY,

Homer, N. Y., 1859.

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SUGGESTIONS TO TEACHERS.

Having been frequently requested by teachers who use Clark's Grammar to give my method of conducting class exercises, I devote a few pages here to that object.

The First STEPS in analysis are given in the GRAMMAR, pp. 11, 12, 13. I devote from three to six lessons to these 6 Introductory Exercises”using the sentences on pp. 13, 14— before requiring the pupils to learn the definitions. Then, while committing to memory the definitions in Part I., the class enjoy frequent repetitions of these enlivening exercises--analyzing all the sentences in the " EXAMPLES” as they occur.

After the class have had sufficient practice in answering common-sense questions like those in the “ Introductory Exercises,” I bring them to the more rigid exercise of systematic analysis, combined with a review of definitions. I give below a few examples of my

CLASS-ROOM EXERCISES. " The class may turn to page 65. "Elliot, what is the subject of sentence number 1 ?" ELLIOT. “Ocean." “Why do you think so ?Elliot. Because that is what the author talks about.

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