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Cecil's second Letter-Carleton's two Letters-Brooke's Recantation

Cobham practised upon-Sir J. Hawles' Observation-Jury repent-

Coke satirised-Ralegh's Return to Prison-His Letter to the King
Expects Death-His Letter to his Wife-Prisoner in the Tower-
His Effects granted to Trustees--His Wife admittedSecond Son
bornTower AnecdotesThe Persons admitted to him-Falsely
named in the Gunpowder-plot-Lady Ralegh Petitions the King-
Sanderson's Conduct-Raleyh brought before CecilHis Life-interest
in Sherborne granted him-Flaw in the Conveyance to his Son-Car
sollicits Sherborne-Ralegh's Letter to Car--Sherborne granted to
Car-Ralegh's Occupations in the Tower His Cordial-Is favoured
by the Queen and Prince Henry-Anecdote of Cobham's Exauination
- Saying of Prince Henry-Ralegh writes against the Marriages with

Sacoy-

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Sir Walter's History of the World His Letter to Sir R. Cotton-

Anecdote-His Miscellaneous Writings->Poetry-Music-Patron of
Learning-Charge of Impiety-Mr. Hume's Observations on him-
-Ambiguity of Character-Union of Characters-His Zeal in
FriendshipConspiracy-Person-Wife-Son Walter - Son Carew
-His Instructions to his Son and to Posterity,

page 183.

APPENDIX,

p. 16.

p. 21.

No. XI.

p. 37.

1

1

THE

L I F E

OF

SIR WALTER RALEGH.

CHAP. VII.

Cecil's corre.
spondence with

WITH the reign of Queen Elizabeth the good fortune of Sir Walter Ralegh sank to rise no more; and those talents, which, under the smiles of a female sovereign of singular penetration, had been called forth and directed to the noblest ends, were doomed to fade and wither under the frowns of her successor.

In no instance was the policy of Cecil more remarkable, than in the part which he acted with King James toward the close of Queen Eli- King James. zabeth's reign. No sooner was the blow struck against Essex, than the secretary thought it prudent to cultivate the favour of a prince who was likely so soon to become his sovereign. Sensible, however, that an intercourse with him might prove highly dangerous under a mistress whose natural jealousy was daily strengthening with age,

he carried on the correspondence into which he entered with all the secrecy and caution necessary to his situation and peculiar to his character'. The letters were for the most part conveyed by the way

of IreJand, and those from this side were written by Lord Henry Howard, under the inspection of Cecil, in a style affectedly obscure. Not

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1 See Robertson's Scotland. Vol. II.

? Birch's Life of Prince Henry, p. 232.

withstanding

B

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