The Stanley tales, original and select, Bind 1

Forsideomslag
Thomas Hurst, 1827 - 334 sider
 

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side xiii - Ah me! for aught that ever I could read. Could ever hear by tale or history, The course of true love never did run smooth: But, either it was different in blood; Her.
Side xiii - Making it momentary as a sound, Swift as a shadow, short as any dream ; Brief as the lightning in the collied night, That, in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth. And ere a man hath power to say, — Behold ! The jaws of darkness do devour it up : So quick bright things come to confusion.
Side 173 - And where are they? and where art thou, My country? On thy voiceless shore The heroic lay is tuneless now — The heroic bosom beats no more! And must thy lyre, so long divine, Degenerate into hands like mine?
Side 173 - Must we but blush? Our fathers bled. Earth ! render back from out thy breast A remnant of our Spartan dead ! Of the three hundred grant but three, To make a new Thermopylae ! What, silent still? And silent all? Ah no ! The voices of the dead Sound like a distant torrent's fall And answer, 'Let one living head, But one arise - we come, we come !' 'Tis but the living who are dumb.
Side 173 - Ah! no; — the voices of the dead Sound like a distant torrent's fall, And answer, 'Let one living head, But one, arise, — we come, we come!
Side 314 - When will you give her the ring ?" said the holy man. " This very day," he answered, " if she be inclined." " Well," said the friar, " go thy ways, and leave all to me ; go home, and stir not from thence — these blessed nuptials shall take place." ' Gabriel thanked him, received his blessing, and went home. The holy father carefully put the cash in his desk, then went to an uncle of Dame Santa, a shoemaker by trade, and a cousin of hers, a barber, and related to them what had happened ; after which...
Side 199 - Journey bestowed such celebrity, but went to an obscure inn kept by a man of the name of Du Long. They desired to have his best apartments, spent a great deal of money, relished the produce of his wretched kitchen, and thought his adulterated wine perfectly genuine. From day to day Du Long supposed they would continue their journey, and proceed to the capital ; for that they had come merely to see Calais was an idea too absurd to enter any body's head. But so far from continuing their journey, and...
Side 29 - Una, with her and my mother, entered. I stood as if rooted to the spot, felt as if all my limbs were paralyzed, and stared at them all, one after another, without saying a word. Steinacker put an end to this, by conducting Lina to me, and assuring me that the elected of my heart had always been true to me, and that, now he had done...
Side 26 - Her gestures were so cheerful, and she appeared so perfectly friendly with Steinacker, that I cried for vexation. Immediately I thought I had found the clue to the whole matter. On that evening, so full of adventures, when Steinacker had questioned me so closely about Lina and her mother, I had displayed my eloquence at the expense of my discretion ; and, in the fulness of my heart, had sketched so charming a picture of Lina that he had been tempted to visit her, had found appearance justify my praises,...
Side 27 - I was, now as then, fur from wishing to make any use of his offer. He called me obstinate and capricious, spoke in a dark sort of manner of domestic comforts, and closed his tiresome conversation, by making me an offer of buying our old house. I was glad to get rid of him, by referring him for an answer till to-morrow. On this he left me, and took up his night's quarters at our neighbour's. "' My mother, on my representation that it was...

Bibliografiske oplysninger