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THE LOOKER-ON.

FRANCE: A HALT ON THE ROAD TO REVOLUTION - PROTESTANTISM A RELIGION

AND A POLITY-NEW DEPARTURES IN CABINET GOVERNMENT-MR WIN.
TERLEY IN PARLIAMENT: AND ON THE GRAND PIANO.

on

It becomes us to mark that acy nullified by negligence. It the death of President Faure has existed for many months, evoked more apprehension of or perhaps for years : any week, violent disturbance in this coun- any day during that time might try than in France. The news have brought the hour for acof that event carried with it tion; yet when it did arrive, in its flight through Britain through one of a dozen possible anticipations of immediate dis- accidents, it found the conspiraorder-disorder which perhaps tors unprovided with a single would end in civil war. Āt button for a single gaiter. And the same hour France itself this was still their unprepared was so little affected by such condition when they knew that fears that the business and the now-or-never hour was at even the pleasures of life went hand. President Faure died

again after momentary when—and perhaps becauseinterruption. We should note the decision of the Court of this difference, because it seems Cassation and the publication to show that we in England of reasons for it were only a had been misled by exaggerated few days off. The conspiracy representations of the state of must have seen in that event things in France. According its grand occasion ; yet there to these accounts, not only was was no preparation for it when every other Frenchman steeped it came so near. That is so imin villany, but the Republic was probable a thing that we may mined by conspiracies of the almost believe with the Parisian most desperate character. These public that there is no such constories were believed in London spiracy at all. but evidently not in Paris; or Yet that France is broken the fear in the one capital that into groups and masses of viruRevolution had found its oppor- lent faction is plain enough; tunity would have been panic one of them being represented in the other.

-though in ignorance of the It is said, however, that there fact, apparently-by the newswas no attack on the Republic paper correspondents who deby the joint-stock conspiracy of claim against that horrible state Bonapartists, Royalists, Boulan- of things every day. And of gists, Jesuits, and Jew-haters, course this is a very grave danbecause the conspirators had no ger, portentous of general upset, time to organise their forces. whether by conspiracy or mere This may be true; but if so, we anarchy. The choosing of a have here to do with a conspir. President to succeed M. Faure scuffle at Lexington John of history. The great AmeriHancock was to have stood can nation has grown out of his trial at Boston for smug- unpromising beginnings, and gling. The fight was oppor- has so far achieved a great tune and prepared. The em

destiny. It has accomplished battled farmers had saved the a vast material prosperity and smugglers from fines that might acquired a great power among have lessened their fortunes, the nations. It has faced wars or imprisonment that would and been victorious; has found have put them out of mischief. difficult problems of government, They plunged their country and has solved them. But it into war to save their pockets. has produced also a remarkable

In the end it was not the race of historians and critics in Americans alone who won the our day, who have given up victory over England.

England. The many of the old “minute-man combination against England views of history, and who are was that of America, France, aware of the weaknesses of the Spain, and Holland. A little

A little vast and complicated civilisamore loyalty among the Whigs tion that environs them. They at home, a few thousand more are not afraid of criticism; they troops, and a little more unity have adopted it. They do not of policy among the commanders want panegyric; they mistrust at the North and South, and it. They will courteously acthe result would have been cept the favourable views of different. It is quite too late Sir George Trevelyan; but they to discuss the might-have-beens will not quote them as history.

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THE LOOKER-ON.

FRANCE: A HALT ON THE ROAD TO REVOLUTION-PROTESTANTISM A RELIGION

AND A POLITY-NEW DEPARTURES IN CABINET GOVERNMENT-MR WIN.
TERLEY IN PARLIAMENT: AND ON THE GRAND PIANO.

on

It becomes us to mark that acy nullified by negligence. It the death of President Faure has existed for many months, evoked more apprehension of or perhaps for years : any week, violent disturbance in this coun- any day during that time might try than in France. The news have brought the hour for acof that event carried with it tion; yet when it did arrive, in its flight through Britain through one of a dozen possible anticipations of immediate dis- accidents, it found the conspiraorder — disorder which perhaps tors unprovided with a single would end in civil war. Āt button for a single gaiter. And the same hour France itself this was still their unprepared was so little affected by such condition when they knew that fears that the business and the now-or-never hour was at even the pleasures of life went hand. President Faure died again after

momentary when—and perhaps becauseinterruption. We should note the decision of the Court of this difference, because it seems Cassation and the publication to show that we in England of reasons for it were only a had been misled by exaggerated few days off. The conspiracy representations of the state of must have seen in that event things in France. According its grand occasion ; yet there to these accounts, not only was was no preparation for it when every other Frenchman steeped it came so near. That is so imin villany, but the Republic was probable a thing that we may mined by conspiracies of the almost believe with the Parisian most desperate character. These public that there is no such constories were believed in London spiracy at all. but evidently not in Paris; or Yet that France is broken the fear in the one capital that into groups and masses of viruRevolution had found its oppor- lent faction is plain enough; tunity would have been panic one of them being represented in the other.

—though in ignorance of the It is said, however, that there fact, apparently—by the newswas no attack on the Republic paper correspondents who deby the joint-stock conspiracy of claim against that horrible state Bonapartists, Royalists, Boulan- of things every day. And of gists, Jesuits, and Jew-haters, course this is a very grave danbecause the conspirators had no ger, portentous of general upset, time to organise their forces. whether by conspiracy or mere This may be true ; but if so, we anarchy. The choosing of a have here to do with a conspir- President to succeed M. Faure

can

in making his policy public; quotations, we think we nor was any such despot ever follow and confute him as to so constantly thwarted. That the prime postulates of his Parliament was at times cor

thesis. rupt we may admit — that is, Stress is laid on the tyranny corrupt means were taken to of the king.

of the king. What had the get there and keep there, and “tyranny” of the king to do place was an element in con- with the discontent in America ? duct — but it can hardly be The colonies were, in fact, little contended that the corruption republics, each having its own of Parliament ever extended to charter or constitution, and each the point of encouraging sedi- free to govern itself. The laws tion or favouring the dismem- they lived under were in the berment of the king's dominions. main passed by themselves. This was left to gentlemen who The chief taxes they paid were played small games with big self-imposed. There was not at counters, and

who talked any time previous to the Stamp “patriotism ” when they meant Act and the tea-duty a single perfidy, and “liberty when man from one end of America they meant rebellion.

to the other who felt the slightest This, it seems to us, is what feather-weight of royal prerogathe author indicates when he tive. And, taking all the prosays :

ceeds of the objectionable taxes

together, they would not have “But in the spring of 1774 events amounted to a penny per

head. were at hand which broke the slumbers and tried the mettle of all true

The very worst tyranny the patriots in the kingdom. A contro

colonies suffered from was the versy was at their door, unlimited in tyranny of their own amazing its scope, inexorable in its demands and cruel legislation, which reon their attention ; and of all men, stricted human liberty of coninside Parliament and out, to none did it come pregnant with greater

science in an

unprecedented issues than to Fox."

And this abominable

legislation they had been free This controversy, so inspir- to pass under charters and coning and awakening and preg- stitutions, some of which were nant and all the rest of it, was as old as Elizabeth, and which the American rebellion. Con

were probably unfamiliar to cerning that event, its origin, George. course,

and conclusion, Sir We are given brilliant deGeorge Trevelyan has endeav- scriptions of the prosperity of oured to precipitate into the the colonies, and of the superior minds of readers of to-day all character of the people, as.comthe passions and prejudices of pared with ignorant and boorish its own bad time. His method Britons at home. The author is ingenious enough, and he has constantly makes these comparithe advantage of many pages

as unfavourable as lanand a felicitous style. But

guage can make them. As to without burdening the small the prosperity, which we admit, space at our disposal by many we reply that it is proof positive

manner.

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