Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub

Yet a'the lads they smile at me

When comin' through the rye.
Amang the train there is a swain

I dearly lo'e mysel';
But whare his hame, or what his name,

I dinna care to tell.
If a body meet a body comin' frae the toun,
If a body greet a body, need a body frown?

Every lassie has her laddie ;

Nane, they say, ha'e I;
Yet a' the lads they smile at me

When comin' through the rye.
Amang the train there is a swain

I dearly lo'e mysel':
But whare his hame, or what his name,

I dinna care to tell.

NNew

I'M OWRE YOUNG TO MARRY YET.

I'm owre young, I'm owre young,
I'm owre young to marry yet,
I'm owre young, 'twould be a sin
To tak me frae my mammy yet ;
I am my mammy's ain bairn,
Nor of my hame am weary yet,
And I would have ye learn, lads,
That ye for me must tarry yet.

For I'm owe young, &c.
I'm owre young, I'm ovre young,
I'm owre young to marry yet,
I'm owre young, 'twould be a sin
To tak me frae my mammy yet ;
For I hae had my ain way,
Nane dare to contradict me yet,
So soon to say I wad obey,
In truth I darena venture yet.

For I'm owre young, &c.

WHEN TIME HATH BEREFT THEE.

WHEN time hath bereft thee of charms now divine, And youth shall have left thee, nor beauty be thine ; When the roses shall vanish that circle thee now, And the thorn thou wouldst banish shall press on thy

brow, In the hour of thy sadness thou’lt think upon me. But the thought shall be madness, deceiver to thee. When he who could turn thee from yirtue and fame, Shall leave thee, and spurn thee, to sorrow and shame ; When by him, thus requited, thy brain shall be stung; Thy hopes shall be blighted, thy bosom be wrung, In the depth of thy sadness, thou'lt think then on me ; But that thought shall be madness, deceiver to thee.

"TWAS MERRY IN THE HALL,

Our ancient English melodies,

Are banish'd out of doors,
And nothing's heard in modern days,
But Signoras and Signors.

Such airs I hate

Like a pig in a gate,
Give me the good old strain,

When 'twas merry in the hall,

The beards wayg'd all,
We shall never see the like again,

We shall never see the like again.
On beds of down our dandies lay,

And waste the cheerful morn,
While our squires of old would rouse the day
With the sound of the bugle horn ;

And their wives took care
The feast to prepare,

For when they left the plain,

Oh! 'twas merry in the hall,

The beards wagg'd all,
We shall never see the like again,

We shall never see the like again.
Twas then the Christmas tale was told

Of goblin, ghost, or fairy, And they cheer'd the hearts of the tenants old With a cup of good canary.

And they each took a smack

Of the cold black jack,
Till the fire burn'd in each brain ;

Oh ! 'twas merry in the hall,

The beards wagg’d all,
May we soon see the like again,
May we soon see the like again.

THE MOUNTAIN MAID.

The mountain maid from her bower has hied,
And sped to the glassy river's side,
Where the radiant moon shone clear and bright,
And the willows waved in the silver light,
On a mossy bank lay a shepherd swain,
He woke his pipe to a tuneful strain,
And so blithely gay were the notes he play'd,
That he charm'd the ear of the mountain maid.
She stopp'd with timid fear oppressid,
While a soft sigh swells her gentle breast,
He caught her glance and mark'd her sigh,
And triumph laughed in his sparkling eye.
So softly sweet was his tuneful ditty,
He charm’d her tender soul to pity,
And so blithely gay were the notes he play'd,
That he gain’d the heart of the mountain maid.

A FAMOUS MAN WAS ROBIN HOOD.

A FAMOUS man was Robin Hood,

The English ballad-singer's joy,
But Scotland has a chief as good,

She has, she has her bold Rob Roy !
A dauntless heart Macgregor shows,

And wondrous length and strength of arm,
He long has quell’d his Highland foes,
And kept, and kept his friends from harm.

A famous man, &c.
His daring mood protects him still,

For this the robber's simple plan,
That they should take who have the will,
And they, and they should keep who can.

A famous man, &c.
And while Rob Roy is free to rove,

In summer's heat and winter's snow,
The eagle he is lord above,
And Rob, and Rob is lord below.

A famous man,

&c.

KELVIN GROVE.

Let us haste to Kelvin Grove, bonnie lassie, 0,
Thro' its mazes let us rove, bonnie lassie, 0;

Where the rose, in all her pride,

Paints the hollow dingle side, Where the midnight fairies glide, bonnie lassie, 0, Let us wander by the mill, bonnie lassie, 0, To the cove beside the rill, bonnie lassie, 0;

Where the glens rebound the call

Of the lofty water-fall, Thro' the mountain's rocky hall, honnie lassie, O.

Tho’ I dare not call thee mine, bonnie lassie, O,
As the smile of fortune's thine, bonnie lassie, 0,

Yet was fortune on my side,

I could say thy father's pride,
And might win thee for my bride, bonnie lassie, 0.
For the frowns of fortune lower, bonnie lassie, O,
On thy lover at this hour, bonnie lassie, 0;

Ere the golden orb of day

Wakes the warblers on the spray,
From this land I must away, bonnie lassie, O.
Then farewell to Kelvin Grove, bonnie lassie, 0,
And adieu to all I love, bonnie lassie, 0,-

To the river winding clear,

To the fragrant scented brier,
Ev’n to thee, of all most dear, bonnie lassie, 0.
And when on a distant shore, bonnie lassie, 0,
Should I fall, midst battle's roar, bonnie lassie, 0,

Wilt thou, Ellen, when you hear

Of thy lover on his bier,
To his memory shed a tear, bonnie lassie, 0 ?

[ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors]

WHEN first he woo'd and won my love,

How sweetly pass'd the time away!
I little thought those hours would prove

Like sunshine on an April day.
But soon the light of joy was o'er,

And clouded every hope of bliss, And love and fortune smil'd no more, And sad was then our parting kiss.

But the clouds are gone,

And the sun will shine,
And the merry bells ring,

When my love is mine.

« ForrigeFortsæt »