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pioneer in the Temperance reform-who laid a good foundation, which
is still firmly held to by multiuudes, and that much is still being done by
Father Spratt in Dublin, who is unceasing in his efforts to establish the
love of perfect sobriety in the hearts of his fellow citizens.

In the provinces, especially in Ulster, a revival of teetotalism is apparent.
The clergy of the Presbyterian Church, in that quarter, have, in large
numbers, given in their adhesion to its principles; many of the laity ear-
nestly giving them their cordial assistance. In the capital, also, many
Protestants are earnestly and successfully engaged in this good work.

In Cork, too, we learn the cause has lately received a fresh impulse:
and that large meetings are held, at which considerable numbers join the
ranks of teetotalism. The people are really anxious to be helped to get
rid of their drinking customs; and they would rejoice to have the temp-
tation of the public-house taken away from them by legislative enactment,
which great benefit to the nation, it is to be hoped, the “United Kingdom
Alliance for the Suppression of the Traffic in Intoxicating Liquors"—(of
which association Father Spratt is a member)—will soon succeed in
having placed upon our statute book.

A DEAD YEAR.

6

I took a year out of my life and story-
A dead year, and said, “I will hew thee a tomb!

* All the kings of the nations lie in glory;'
Cased in cedar, and shut in a sacred gloom;
Swathed in linen and precious unguents old ;
Painted with cinnaber, and rich with gold.

“Silent they rest in solemn salvatory,
Sealed from the moth and the owl and the flitter-mouse-

Each with his name on his brow.
• All the kings of the nations lie in glory,
Every one in his own house;'

Then why not thou ?
"Year," I said, “ thou shalt not lack
Bribes to bar thy coming back;
Doth old Egypt wear her best
In the chambers of her rest?
Doth she take to her last bed
Beaten gold, and glorious red ?
Envy not! for thou shalt wear
In the dark a shroud as fair;
Golden with the sunny ray
Thou withdrawest from my day;

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Wrought upon with colours fine,
Stolen from this life of mine;
Like the dusty Lybian kings,
Lie with two wide-open wings
On the breast, as if to say,
On these wings hope flew away.
And so house, and thus adorned,
Not forgotten, but not scorned,
Let the dark for evermore
Close thee when I close the door!
And the dust for ages fall
In the creases of thy pall;
And no voice nor visit rude

Break thy sealed solitude.”
I took the year out of my life and story~
The dead year, and said, “I have hewed thee a tomb !

“ All the kings of the nations lie in glory ;'
Cased in cedar and shut in sacred gloom ;
But for the sword, and the sceptre, and diadem,
Sure thou didst reign like them.”
So I laid her with those tyrants old and hoary,

According to my vow;
For I said, “ The kings of the nations lie in glory,
And so shalt thou.”

JEAN INGELOW.

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THE SALTMARKET DANCING SCHOOLS.

(From Memoir of a Female Convict, by a Prison Matron.) Entrance to these dancing “skeels” is generally by an unlighted close, up a cominon stair to a large room on the first floor. The door of this room-on which "DANCING HERE" is legibly inscribed—is kept by a scoiling individual-probably the proprietor of the establishment--who receives ihe pennies of his young patrons, unlocks the door, admits them, and locks them in. In this room, lighted by gas or candles according to the taste or means of the proprietors, a hundred or a hundred and fifty are speedily assembled-ranged around the room on forms placed against the wall. They are of all ages, from the boy and girl of seven or eight years old, to the men and women of two or three and twenty, but the majority are girls and boys averaging from twelve to fifteen years. The boys are chietly apprentices or young thieves; the girls are of the usual poor class—more than usually poor perhaps—three-fourths of them without shoes and stockings, and all of them bonnetless, as is usual amongst the

BAND OF HOPE RECORD.

A PLEA FOR BAND OF HOPE LIBRARIES.

By E.J. OLIVER.

* Knowledge,” saith the wise man, “is power,” and as individuals or communities grow in knowledge, so does their power increase in an equal proportion. It is no argument against knowledge that many of its possessors have used it for a bad purpose, or that its power for evil is equal to its power for good. Fire, when used aright, is one of the great blessings of civilization, and no sensible person would say, that because of the frightful consequences that have at times resulted from it, we should cease to make it minister to our requirements.

The alphabet once mastered, a prospect boundless as the mighty ocean, lies before us. Step by step we climb the hill, and every time we advance, the beauty of the view increases. Temptingly hangs the rich fruit on the surrounding trees, lovely are the flowers, and delightful the fragrance they exhale. Is it to be wondered at, that we should pluck those nearest to our hand, nor stay to enquire too curiously as to their ultimate effect. With our minds informed, and our eyesight dazzled by the loveliness of the scene, we seek not for wisdom, but only crave for food wherewith to satisfy our newly awakened desires. Of quantity there is no lack-turn which way we will, we have but to put forth our hand, and take of the abundance so lavishly provided. But quantity is one thing, and quality is another. As at this period we are incapable of judging for ourselves, it is needful that those who have travelled in the same path, and gained experience, should point out that which shall be for our advantage, and whlle gratifying the taste, form and improve the mind.

The quantity of worthless periodicals that issue from the press, is truly alarming; and not only are most of them of a foolish and trifling nature, but many are positively vicious, and full of impurities clothed in fascinating forms; thus, insidiously undermining all pure thought and feeling. Boys and girls will read, and halfpenny journals and low novels in penny numbers, are unfortunately too often the companions of their leisure hours. Do they gain knowledge by the perusal of such works? Yes,

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and the Protestant Dean of St. Patrick's are its honorary secretaries. His last labour of love in this direction, and one of which he is himself the architect is a night asylum for females.” It is situated in the Liberty—one of the poorest districts in Dublin; and many hundreds of destitute women receive shelter there every week. The institution is on a large scale, and was built many years ago, by a wealthy benevolent citizen, as a drying house for the poor weavers, who were then a numerous body in the district referred 10.

Father Spratt, by appeals to the people, lias succeeded in obtaining voluntary contributions to sustain this charity; and when the funds admit of it, the inmates are given a breakfast of bread and milk, before they leave the institution in the morning. A night's shelier, is however its main object.

The useful labours of the Very Rev. Dr. Sprait, have culminated the last three arid twenty years, in the great cause of Teetotalism. Daily he is to be found at his post, at the Chapel house in Aungier street, administering the “Pledge” to all comers; and every Sunday evening, during that long period of his life, with very few exceptions ideed, he has, to the knowledge of the writer of this memoir, atiended in the Old Chapel in Cuffe lane, now and for many years a temperance hall, exhorting the people, and encouraging them to shake off their drinking habits, which have been their ruin for many generations, and the curse of old Ireland for ages. Thousands cheerfully respond to his appeals.

In this labour of love, Father Spratt has been most successful; and although 1,100 public-houses in his beloved native city counteract his labours in this work of mercy, yet thousands of his fellow-citizens are annually rescued by him from those trap; which lead myriads into sin and misery, and have reason to bless him, and do bless him, for their deliverance from the foulest degradation to which man is subjected, and from which he must be saved before his feet can ever be placed on the rock of prosperity and happiness. It is in vain that ministers preach, and that other benevolent men labour, in the cause of our down-trodden humanity, while the drink demon is abroad to counteract this work by sowing tares among the good seed they are scattering abroad.

Of late years Father Spratt confined his advocacy of teetotalism almost entirely to Dublin; but he has frequently visited many of our provincial towns, and is ready to do so again whenever invited by proper authority.

He more than once visited Drogheda, and Armagh, and Belfast. In this latter town he received, a few years since, a complete ovation--all its inhabitants turning out to hail his arrival. Ile held an open-air meeting in the neighbouring town-Holywood-and for two days in succession he gave ile “Pledge" in Belfast to many hundreds, in a large unfinished factory yard that was lent for the occasion.

In concluding this short and inadequate memoir, of a worthy and most excellent citizen, and a zealous and beloved Catholic priest, we would observe, that although much remains to be done before the great masses of the people of Ireland can be placed in a condition of happiness and comfort, yet that much was done by the late Father Matthew-our great pioneer in the Temperance reform—who laid a good foundation, which is still firmly held to by multitudes, and ibat much is still being done by Father Spratt in Dublin, who is unceasing in his efforts 10 establish the love of perfect sobriety in the hearts of his fellow citizens.

In the provinces, especially in Ulster, a revival of teetotalism is apparent. The clergy of the Presbyterian Church, in that quarter, have, in large numbers, given in their adhesion to its principles; many of the laity earnestly giving them their cordial assistance. In the capital, also, many Protestants are earnestly and successfully engaged in this good work.

In Cork, too, we learn the cause has lately received a fresh impulse: and that large meetings are held, at which considerable numbers join the ranks of teetotalism. The people are really anxious to be helped to get rid of their drinking customs; and they would rejoice to have the temptation of the public-house taken away from them by legislative enactment, which great benefit to the nation, it is to be hoped, the “United Kingdom Alliance for the Suppression of the Traffic in Intoxicating Liquors"—(of which association Father Spratt is a member)—will soon succeed in having placed upon our statute book.

a

A DEAD YEAR.

I took a year out of my life and story--
A dead year, and said, “I will hew thee a tomb!

* All the kings of the nations lie in glory;'
Cased in cedar, and shut in a sacred gloom ;
Swathed in linen and precious unguents old ;
Painted with cinnaber, and rich with gold.

“Silent they rest in solemn salvatory,
Sealed from the moth and the owl and the flitter-mouse-

Each with his name on his brow.
* All the kings of the nations lie in glory,
Every one in his own house ;'

Then why not thou ?
“ Year,” I said, “thou shalt not lack
Bribes to bar thy coming back;
Doth old Egypt wear her best
In the chambers of her rest?
Doth she take to her last bed
Beaten gold, and glorious red?
Envy not! for thou shalt wear
In the dark a shroud as fair

;
Golden with the sunny ray
Thou withdrawest from my day;

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