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Number of

Total

Received from
PLACE.
Constables.

Cost.

Government. Birmingham

377 £24,900 £5,414 Metropolitan District 6,566 489,590 141,322 Liverpool

. 1,002 71,480 15,992 Manchester

671 41,330 9,211 *London (City)

628 50,296 Bristol

303

18,248 4,081 Leeds

228 14,055 3,104 Sheffield

191 11,372 2,693
Newcastle

140
10.538

2,151
Salford

104
7,221

1,648
Bradford

119

7,131 1,733 • The city of London receives no aid from Government towards the cost of its police force.

The moral state of these localities, as reported upon by the officers enumerated, is placed broadly before us; a gloomy catalogue indeed it is :

Known Receivers. Prosti- Suspected Vagrants.
thieves.
tutes. Persons.

Total. Birmingham 923 191

428 883 1,652 4,077 Bristol 172 35 395 101 290

974 Liverpool

340 65 2,151 94 340 2,989 Manchester

685 247 1,024 235 517 2,731 Salford 209 64 119 147

12 541 London (City) 53 12 48

37

64 ... 214 Metrop. District... 2,584 267

5,747 1,864 1,412 11,863 Newcastle

142 37 364 119 146 808 Bradford 91 5 151 141

491

779 Leeds

294 62 340 315 837 1,848 Sheffield 104 78 170

72 165 549 A popular writer has said that “gaols are monuments of neglected duty;" and if this be correct, and I am hardly prepared to question it, what can be the fact with these poor wretches ? Their hands against every man, and every man's hand against them. The account of their haunts is as follows:

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HOUSES OF BAD CHARACTER RESORTED TO BY THE CRIMINAL CLASSES. Receiving Public

Tramps'
Houses. Houses, &c. Brothels. Lodgings. Total.
Birmingham 191 228

184
236

839 Bristol

28
82
158
27

290 Liverpool 58 413

912 184 1,567 Manchester 208 229

425

370 1,232 Salford 40 64

16
23

143 London (City)

11
43

9
14

77 Metrop. District 188 493 1,535 379 2,595 Newcastle

37
78

53

245 Bradford (Y.)

5
20
58 45

128 Leeds 62 100 47 40

249 Sheffield

31
56

96
18

201

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Public houses stand out alarmingly conspicuous here, notwithstanding the extreme respectability of the trade," and no one who is at all cognisant of the facts but must be well aware that the above is an under-statement rather than an over. Mr, Alderman Wire, in his evidence before the parliamentary committee of 1854, acknowledged to 1000 out of the 6000 publicans of London being men of exceptional character ; While Mr. Bishop, the beer-sellers' solicitor, said that 5000 out of the 6000 was nearer the mark, and on being re-called by the committee, both reiterated their statements. It would be erring entirely on the side of charity to “split the difference” between these “honourable" witnesses ; the wickedness of licensing, approving of, and supporting such a traffic, must thus be painfully apparent.

The next return shows the number of indictable offences, and cases that the magistrates dealt with summarily, during the year, towns being arranged according to their moral aspect. It would be interesting to have the correct number of public houses and beer-shops in each place, in order to show how the number of drinking places influence the criminal returns:

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Offences,

indict. & minor. 1. Bradford

247

1,499 2. Sheffield

450

4,325 3. Birmingham

863

6,923 4. Leeds

800

5,351 5. Newcastle

421

2,879 6. Salford

1,129

1,947 7. Bristol

236

4,517 8. Metropolitan Dis. 12,230

84,356 9. Manchester

6,430

10,375 10. London (City) 1,059

6,914 ... 11. Liverpool

4,034 34,645

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The more serious of these offences are thus classified :-
Breaking in- Highway

Offences Burglaries. to shops, &c. Robbery. Larceny. agst. person. Birmingham

167
99
30
312

30 Bristol

39
25
1
157

8 Liverpool 89 179

3,061 218 Manchester

524

553 128 4,501 91 Salford

20
40
4
963

10 London and Metropopolitan district 349 108

81 9,598 465 Newcastle

9
19
5
348

17 Bradford

3
20

4
173

5 Leeds

46
81
19
554

19 Sheffield

44
37
6
261

18

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.1,290 1,161 278 1,9928 881 The cases which we may fairly attribute uniformly to the drink are given below, and while it does not give in any way an adequate return of the drunkenness and violence arising from the use of intoxicating liquors, it is sufficiently awful.

Drunken cases. © Assaults.
Bristol

599

1,717 Liverpool

12,076

3,383 Manchester

3,373

2,184 Salford

603

425 London

353

896 Metropolitan District

20,294

16,456 Newcastle

824

792 Bradford

163

419 Leeds

1,475

1,330 Sheffield

890

753 Birmingham

813 An aggregate of 71,084 in a population of 5,159,979 persons, or one drunken criminal to every 72 inhabitants, which would give for the entire population 403,285 violently-disposed and intemperate persons; but it is well known that scarce one in fifty persons who get drunk are taken into custody, and men and women who add to their drunkenness brutality, are frequently tolerated for months, and even years, before they are brought before the bench; and what a fearful view of the prevalence of intemperance is here! The unknown abominations of the drink are possibly and probably even worse than its publicly exposed villanies. Thank God for the temperance movement, even though it were but for a protest against this demoralizing and devilish drink! Had no drunkard ever been reclaimed,—had no child ever been forewarned of the danger, had no political protest ever been made against the intoxicating cup, by the temperanee reformer, I would still bless God for

1,266

the noble band who have wept and prayed for the arrest of the mighty woe; but when I remember the noble stand taken by multitudes who will give themselves no rest until the evil is known and acknowledged, and the remedy seen and embraced, I would in the name of the myriads of drink-stricken and perishing souls, say to such,—Brethren and sisters, labour on! Though we may not be saved from the gulf into which we are fast plunging, for the sake of those who are not in such imminent peril, labour on! For the sake of the peace of families, labour on! For the sake of the church of God, labour on! For the sake of the dear children, labour on! For the sake of your country, labour on! And if you should not live to see the victory, be true! you'll miss not the rest and the reward.

Annals of the United Ringdom Band of Hope Union.

LABOURS OF THE AGENTS. Mr. W. B. AFFLECK has lectured and preached at the following places since our last report:-Farm Hill; Cononley; Cross Hills; Birkenshaw; Kettlewell; Colne; Lisburn; Stopper Lane; Sawley; Yeadon; Guiseley; Rothwell; Desborough, &c. Many of these places were attended more than once. The total number addressed in the four weeks amounted to 8,050.

Mr. William Bell is again engaged by the Northamptonshire Union for three months. He is now lecturing in connection with the Societies belonging to the Union, and from various reports, is giving great satisfaction, whilst numbers are being added to the different societies.

During the month, Mr. G. BLABY has attended and addressed the following meetings :-Bloomsbury Refuge, twice; Denmark Street, three times; Fetter Lane, twice; Union Hall, Bishopsgate; Whitfield Chapel; Broadway, Westminster; Neckinger Road, Bermondsey; Fox and Knot Court; Carr Street, Limehouse; Adam Street, Manchester Square; Salem Chapel, Bow Road; St. Paul's, Clerkenwell; Hayes; Old Ford; Nunhead; Shadwell; and Tottenham. He has also preached eight sermons, and addressed three sunday schools.

Mr. F. Smith has lectured, and addressed Bands of Hope as follows :Nunhead Green; Forest Hill, twice; Shadwell; Spa Fields; Deverell Street; Lansdowne Place; Ogle Mews, Tottenbam Court Road; Three Colt Lane, Mile End; Bloomsbury Chapel, Sunday School; Angel Alley, Bishopsgate; Whitecross Place, Finsbury; George Street, Lambeth; Wandsworth; Hayes, Middlesex; Crayford, Kent; Amicable Row, Kent Street; Slough, Bucks; Herve Bay, Kent.

UNITED KINGDOM BAND OF HOPE UNION.-The autumnal soirée of the United Kingdom Band of Hope Union was held on Wednesday evening, Oct. 21st, in the large saloon of Shirley's Hotel, Queen square, Bloomsbury, which was filled with ladies and gentlemen interested in the operations of the Union. The Rev. G. W. M‘Cree made a statement respecting the present and prospective operations of the Union, and gave an interesting account of the three weeks' tour he had just concluded in Devon and Cornwall, where he had held seventeen numerously-attended meetings, and found the cause in a healthy and hopeful condition. Mr. M‘Cree stated that the executive of the Union intended to appoint, as soon as they could find a suitable person, an agent who would devote his entire time to the promotion of temperance in connection with Sunday schools. Mr. W. J. Haynes passed a high eulogium on the character and labours of their honorary secretary, Mr. M'Cree, and presented that gentleman, in the name of a few friends of the Union, with a gold pencilcase, and a purse containing 75 sovereigns. Mr. M‘Cree suitably and feelingly acknowledged the gift of his friends, which he said was entirely unanticipated; and the meeting afterwards was addressed by Messrs. Shirley, Dunn, Tweedie, Rae, Campbell, Murphy, and the Rev. J. Clif

ord. There was some excelleut music by Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher, Messrs. Thwaites, sen. and jun., and others; and the proceedings, which were of the most interesting and agreeable character, were brought to a close about half-past ten o'clock by the usual vote of thanks.- Morning Star.

THE BAND OF HOPE MOVEMENT IN PLYMOUTH.-A number of ladies and gentlemen met in the chess-rooi of the Mechanics' Institute, Plymouth, on Tuesday Oct. 6th, to consider the best means of forwarding the Band of Hope movement in this town; Samuel Eliott, Esq., in the chair. After tea the Rev. G. W. M'Cree (of London), the secretary of the Band of Hope Union and the editor of a large amount of temperance literature, gave an interesting account of the rise, progress, and present state of the Union. On the conclusion of his address, a conversation ensued. Various suggestions were made, and a resolution carried in favour of inviting Sunday-school superintendents and teachers to a tea and conversazione as soon as arrangements could be made for that purpose. The object of the conversazione will be to discuss the propriety of forming Bands of Hope in Sabbath-schools, as a means of protecting the children from the baneful influence of strong drink, public houses, and their associate evils. The object is one which commends itself to the support of all who interest themselves in the education of the young. It is to be hoped that whenever this conversazione is held, all the schools in the town will be well represented, and that a thoroughly free interchange of opinion will take place on this very interesting and important subject.

BAND OF Hope FESTIVAL.—The seventh annual festival of the Highworth Band of Hope, or Juvenile Temperançe Society, was celebrated in the British School Room on Friday, Oct. 9, when about 80 children were regaled with an ample supply of tea, cake, and bread and butter. This important operation concluded, a most agreeable evening was spent under the efficient superintendence of Mr. John Reynolds, who seems to possess the happy but comparatively rare quality of being able to sustain the interest of children, and at the same time blending instruction and wholesome advice with amusement. We cannot speak too highly of Mr.

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