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LONDON:

PRINTED BY J. BALE, 78, GREAT TITCHFIELD STREET,

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Teaching

53 Temperance Gleanings. ......................... 278 The Beer Barrels

76 The Blessings of Total Abstinence...... 88 The Connection Between Drink and Juvenile Delinquency

206 The Drunkard's Doom .....................**

7 The Drunken Revel

158 The Fallen Star

30 The Great Curse of England The Great Curse ...................................

278 The Introduction of Teetotalism into London

25 The Lady Bird ...................................

6 The Meinory of Former Sins

265 The Open-Air Mission ......................

221 The Prayer of the Drunkard's Child 205 The Ransomed Child..........................

Back again

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Gatherings

91 Hints to Mothers

269 History of the Thirsk Christian Temperance Society

195 Home!

266 How it Began and Grew

51 How Many shall Become Drunkards... 90

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18 The Reformation of St. Giles's............ 231 The Rev. C. H. Spurgeon's Lecture ... 4 The Two Roads

105 The Words of a Friend ...................... 228 The Words of Experlence... ... ... ... ... ... 200 The Wife's Appeal

36 Two Hours in a Band of Hope Conver

sazione ....................................... 163

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Uncle True and his Jog to Jersey

242 United Kingdom Band of Hope Union 121 United Kingdom Band of Hope Union Conference

136, 145 175

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Village Club

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Wanderers ..................................... 169 What Jack did at Naples

113 What Richard Baxter Said ..................

7 Why some Children do not Join the Band of Hope

............................... 241 Words for Speakers.....

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BAND OF HOPE RECORD.

OUR BAND OF HOPE.

By the Rev. T. HOLME, East Cowton, Yorkshire. The Band of Hope movement is justly attracting the thoughtful attention of Temperance men. Judiciously managed, liberally fostered, and wisely directed, one can scarcely overrate the strength which it may be expected to bring to our cause. Being, however, yet in its pupilage, and hitherto growing up to maturity in a desultory form, without any regular organization, we are obliged to feel our way in order to decide upon the best method of bringing out its powers into effective operation. To assist us in ascertaining this method, I think it might be a good plan, if a few friends from different districts could be prevailed upon to give a short sketch of the system on which they conduct their local Bands of Hope. Under this impression, I wish to furnish a short account of the manner in which we manage our own village Band of Hope. I may here premise that my parish is a small rural one, containing by the last census, only 472 inhabitants, and that of this number we have a larger proportion of teetotallers than can be found in most parishes. As there is no other individual in the place to take a leading interest in the Band of Hope, it is altogether under the management of my own family. I will now give you from our Parish Magazine, the account there contained of the first opening of our meetings :

“An EVENING WITH THE BAND OF HOPE.-Being desirous to encourage the juvenile members of the Temperance cause, my daughters and myself thought that it would be a good plan to invite all the young teetotallers above 7 years old, of not less than a month's standing, to the Vicarage, to spend an hour in some way that might combine pleasure and instruction. The first meeting was held on Monday, the 4th of Feb. 1861, when we had the pleasure of finding 17 boys and 18 girls. On the 11th, the number was 23 boys and 22 girls. On the evening of the second meeting, when I entered the room, I found them arranged, the boys seated on one side of the room, and the girls on the other, all of them listening with evident delight to the story of Lazy Lawrence, which Miss Holme was reading to them. The story was j ist being brought to a close, when Lazy Lawrence was left in prison, having been sent thither for some crime to which he had been tempted by idleness and the bad company that he kept. This gave me an opening for addressing to them a few words, pointing out the rock on which Lazy Lawrence had been wrecked, and the importance of avoiding such company as would lead to idleness, drinking, and other bad habits. I then inquired of them, if they could

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pledge; and I told them so. - an hour in learning to sing a few verses cly,' a Temperance melody, they had each a of our Jnvenile Library, which we have provided wme, and to be exchanged for another on the deat

with so they all went away in high glee. Es discontinued these meetings during the summer care este concattendance became small

, we have recently , and they seem to have lost none of their original

In order to give a pleasing and instructive variety to 3) Lerings, I have at their conclusion shewed the children

ry, the relative positions and motions of the planets, As with four, and adding a new planet every evening.

in this means the subject is more strongly impressed upon their winds, while it is extended over a larger space of time. Having exhausted the orrery, I purpose illustrating the same subject by 2018 of the magic lantern, and thus, by these and similar noveldies, I hope to keep up the interest of the meetings till the time of their being again discontinued for the summer. By thus blending instruction with amusement, we do our best not only to secure the cheerful attendance of the children, but also the support and favour of their parents. I may here remark that we conclude our meetings with a prayer or hymn. As we have to carry on the work single-handed, we are not in a position to give our young friends any expensive treat, such as a trip by railway. We endeavour to make up for this, by inviting them to a tea party in the course of the summer, when they are entertained by games adapted to their years

. This is an event to which they always look forward with pleasure.

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