The Mythology of the British Islands: An Introduction to Celtic Myth, Legend, Poetry, and Romance

Forsideomslag
Blackie and son, limited, 1905 - 446 sider

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Side 133 - But now farewell. I am going a long way With these thou seest - if indeed I go (For all my mind is clouded with a doubt) To the island-valley of Avilion; Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow, Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies Deep-meadow'd, happy, fair with orchard-lawns And bowery hollows crown'd with summer sea, Where I will heal me of my grievous wound.
Side 331 - More yellow was her head than the flower of the broom, and her skin was whiter than the foam of the wave, and fairer were her hands and her fingers than the blossoms of the wood anemone amidst the spray of the meadow fountain.
Side 331 - And the youth pricked forth upon a steed with head dappled grey, of four winters old, firm of limb, with shell-formed hoofs, having a bridle of linked gold on his head, and upon him a saddle of costly gold. And in the youth's hand were two spears of silver, sharp, well-tempered, headed with steel, three ells in length, of an edge to wound the wind, and cause blood to flow, and swifter than the fall of the dewdrop from the blade of reedgrass upon the earth when the dew of June is at the heaviest.
Side 340 - I have been here, and I have never heard of the man for whom you inquire, except once, when I went in search of food as far as Llyn Llyw. And when I came there, I struck my talons into a salmon, thinking he would serve me as food for a long time. But he drew me into the deep, and I was scarcely able to escape from him.
Side 257 - So they took the blossoms of the oak, and the blossoms of the broom, and the blossoms of the meadow-sweet, and produced from them a maiden, the fairest and most graceful that man ever saw. And they baptized her, and gave her the name of Flower-Aspect.
Side 344 - Rather than that gray king, whose name, a ghost, Streams like a cloud, man-shaped, from mountain peak, And cleaves to cairn and cromlech still...
Side 253 - So they had the boy baptized, and as they baptized him he plunged into the sea. And immediately when he was in the sea, he took its nature, and swam as well as the best fish that was therein. And for that reason was he called Dylan, the son of the Wave. Beneath him no wave ever broke. And the blow whereby he came to his death, was struck by his uncle Govannion.
Side 335 - A cursed ungentle son-in-law, truly! As long as I remain alive, my eyesight will be the worse. Whenever I go against the wind, my eyes will water; and peradventure my head will burn, and I shall have a giddiness every new moon. Cursed be the fire in which it was forged. Like the bite of a mad dog is the stroke of this poisoned iron.
Side 394 - A SOCIAL HISTORY OF ANCIENT IRELAND: Treating of the Government, Military System and Law ; Religion, Learning and Art ; Trades, Industries and Commerce; Manners, Customs and Domestic Life of the Ancient Irish People. With 361 Illustrations. 2 vols. 8vo., Kaye and Malleson.— HISTORY OP TUB INDIAN MUTINY, 1857-1858.
Side 39 - To him without glory They would kill their piteous, wretched offspring With much wailing and peril, To pour their blood around Cromm Cruaich. " Milk and corn They would ask from him speedily In return for one-third of their healthy issue: Great was the horror and the scare of him.

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