A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High Treason and Other Crimes and Misdemeanors: From the Earliest Period to the Year 1783, with Notes and Other Illustrations, Bind 14

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T. C. Hansard for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1819

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Side 549 - And they do claim, demand and insist upon all and singular the premises, as their undoubted rights and liberties; and that no declarations, judgments, doings or proceedings, to the prejudice of the people in any of the said premises, ought in any wise to be drawn hereafter into consequence or example.
Side 545 - And that for redress of all grievances, and for the amending, strengthening, and preserving of the laws, parliaments ought to be held frequently.
Side 549 - Parliament, do pray that it may be declared and enacted, That all and singular the rights and liberties asserted and claimed in the said declaration, are the true, ancient, and indubitable rights and liberties of the people of this kingdom, and so shall be esteemed, allowed, adjudged, deemed, and taken to be, and that all and every the particulars aforesaid shall be firmly and strictly holden and observed, as they are expressed in the said declaration; and all officers and ministers whatsoever shaU...
Side 679 - Do we want to contemplate his power? We see it in the immensity of the Creation. Do we want to contemplate his wisdom? We see it in the unchangeable order by which the incomprehensible whole is governed. Do we want to contemplate his munificence? We see it in the abundance with which he fills the earth. Do we went to contemplate his mercy? We see it in his not withholding that abundance even from the unthankful.
Side 655 - Christianity in genera!, is parcel of the common law of England, and therefore to be protected by it. Now whatever strikes at the very root of Christianity tends manifestly to a dissolution of the civil government ; so that to say an attempt to subvert the established religion is not punishable by those laws upon which it is established, is an absurdity.
Side 517 - riot' is described to be a tumultuous disturbance of the peace by three persons or more, assembling together of their own authority, with an intent mutually to assist one another against any who shall oppose them in the execution of some enterprise of a private nature, and afterwards actually executing the same in a violent and turbulent manner, to the terror of the people, whether the act intended were of itself lawful or unlawful.
Side 667 - Did Milton understand those mythologies ? — was he less versed than Mr. Paine in the superstitions of the world ? No, — they were the subject of his immortal song ; and though shut out from all recurrence to them, he poured them forth from the stores of a memory rich with all that man ever knew, and laid them in their order as the illustration of...
Side 815 - ... when a man doth compass or imagine the death of our lord the King, or of our lady his Queen or of their eldest son and heir...
Side 549 - And whereas the said late King James the Second having abdicated the government, and the throne being thereby vacant, " His Highness the Prince of Orange (whom it hath pleased Almighty God to make the glorious instrument of delivering this kingdom from Popery and arbitrary power) did (by the advice of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and divers principal persons of the Commons...
Side 665 - Gentlemen, it would be useless and disgusting to enumerate the other passages within the scope of the indictment. How any man can rationally vindicate the publication of such a book, in a country where the Christian religion is the very foundation of the law of the land, I am totally at a loss to conceive, and have no ideas for the discussion of.

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