Lalla Rookh: An Oriental Romance

Forsideomslag
Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1817 - 397 sider
 

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Populære passager

Side 295 - WHO has not heard of the Vale of Cashmere, With its roses the brightest that earth ever gave, Its temples, and grottos, and fountains as clear As the love-lighted eyes that hang over their wave...
Side 157 - There was a time," he said in mild, Heart-humbled tones — " thou blessed child! " When young and haply pure as thou,
Side 63 - There's a bower of roses by BENDEMEER'S§ stream, And the nightingale sings round it all the day long ; In the time of my childhood 'twas like a sweet dream, To sit in the roses and hear the bird's song.
Side 154 - Cheer'd by this hope she bends her thither ; — Still laughs the radiant eye of Heaven, Nor have the golden bowers of Even In the rich West begun to wither ; — When, o'er the vale of BALBEC winging Slowly, she sees a child at play, Among the rosy wild flowers singing, As rosy and as wild as they ; Chasing, with eager hands and eyes, The beautiful blue damsel-flies...
Side 63 - And a dew was distill'd from their flowers, that gave All the fragrance of summer, when summer was gone. . Thus memory draws from delight, ere it dies, An essence that breathes of it many a year...
Side 159 - While the same sunbeam shines upon The guilty and the guiltless one, And hymns of joy proclaim through Heaven The triumph of a Soul Forgiven...
Side 151 - Now, upon Syria's land of roses Softly the light of Eve reposes, And, like a glory, the broad sun Hangs over sainted Lebanon ; Whose head in wintry grandeur towers, And whitens with eternal sleet, While summer, in a vale of flowers, Is sleeping rosy at his feet.
Side 155 - mid the roses lay, She saw a wearied man dismount From his hot steed, and on the brink Of a small imaret's rustic fount Impatient fling him down to drink.
Side 188 - Oh ! ever thus, from childhood's hour, I've seen my fondest hopes decay ; I never loved a tree or flower, But 'twas the first to fade away. I never nursed a dear gazelle, To glad me with its soft black eye, But when it came to know me well, And love me, it was sure to die...
Side 333 - When first on me they breathed and shone ; New, as if brought from other spheres, Yet welcome as if loved for years ! Then fly with me, — if thou hast known No other flame, nor falsely thrown A gem away, that thou hadst sworn Should ever in thy heart be worn. Come, if the love thou hast for me Is pure and fresh as mine for thee, — Fresh as the fountain under ground. When first 'tis by the lapwing...

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