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MAGAZINE.

ment. How ridiculous the stern and

Reply to Critical Inquiries, &c. self - opiniated importance of the former! how disgusting the pride,

[Inserted No. 5.] ignorance and impertinence of the TO THE EDITOR OF THE IMPERIAL latter! Persons who barely comply with the prescribed forms of decency SIR, and decorum, conceive themselves On lately perusing your valuable Misremarkably modest; forgetting that cellany, col. 419, I was attracted by the chief and component parts of this the title, “ Inquiries respecting some qualification, diffidence and humility, minute particulars of the English lanare essentially requisite. How ami- guage;" and on cursorily perusing able is the youth, who, notwithstand those Inquiries, I strongly suspected ing the possession of superior abilities that your correspondent A. B. had and education, is diffident of his own mistaken Lindley Murray in some of opinion, and with modest deference his remarks. I therefore referred to attentively considers the remarks of that gentleman, and found that in his all ; or, even if he is not conspicuously Notes and Observations under Rule blessed with ability and education, 14, Syntax, he states, that “particibut presumes not more than he pos- ples are sometimes governed by the sesses, still how praiseworthy is his Article ; for the present participle, with conduct! Contrast it with the bois- the definite article the before it, beterous presumption of arrogance and comes a substantive, and must have ignorance, and behold more clearly the preposition of after it.” The senthe inestimable advantages resulting tence referred to by A. B. as coming from Modesty! The truly modest feel under this note, is "the cause of my not less diffident of their own opinion, not receiving it.But, Sir, what dethan fearful of too hastily and incon- finite article in this sentence comes siderately contradicting that of an- before the participle, in the way pointother: the delicacy of their own feel- ed out by Murray, so as to be said to goings induces them to be always watch-vern that participle ? Now the, the only ful, lest they should incautiously definite article in the sentence, cannot wound the feelings of others. A sym- be said to do that, for it applies to its pathetic ardour pervades in the heart, particular substantive cause :' and, by which they are at all times not only moreover, I understood Murray to inclined, but willing, to rejoice with mean (when he says before) immedithe fortunate, compassionate with the ately before ; so that the of in the sendistressed, bear with the pragmatical, tence, as amended by A. B., is an inand envy not the prudish. In short, terpolation, and quite ungrammatical, to use a paradoxical expression, Mo- according to Murray, as well as ineledesty is not what (in these days) it gant. As he has not given any referseems to be.

It is not that mummery ence to a grammarian in his second of expression, that preciseness of form, objection, and as it appears really frithat stiffness of demeanour, which is volous, I shall pass it over. so conspicuous in the middle and he says it is authorized by Mr. Murray higher classes of society ; neither is himself; but, qui quondam erravit rursus it to be discovered in that refined de- erret. licacy, which shrinks at the idea of The answer to the last objection will any open personal impropriety, or de- be allowed, I doubt not, on my referviation from established usage, but ring your correspondent to a similar which feels no remorse in privately dip- passage in the Latin tongue ; Ubi ping its envenomed tongue in the cup ad Dianæ veneris ite ad dextram.Now of slander and detraction.

Dianæ here supplies the place of two Artificial Modesty may, with some cases, the genitive and accusative; but degree of propriety, be compared to it is got over by understanding the acour garments. Like them, we put it cusative templum. In the same way on and off'; we suit it to the time and mayA.B.'s objection be gotover, by putplace; so that it is universally acknow- ting the sentence thus : " their house is ledged, not to be wholly impossible more commodious than our's;" e.g.our for a seeming saint to become meta- house.

In haste, morphosed into a very devil.

Your very obedient Servant,
E. W.

M. S. Liverpool, 7th August, 1819.

Shadwell, London, Aug. 16, 1810.

'Tis true,

641 Antiquities.--Review- The Edipus Romanus. 642 MR. EDITOR,

contradiction and argument; and, Most likely, your antiquarian corre- rudely elevated with a consciousness spondent Q, may, through the medium of his own mental superiority, he smiles of your invaluable Miscellany, be with a supercilious sneer on the comenabled to give the lovers of antiquity mon herd of his “unreflecting fellow and local information, some elucida- creatures ;” and too frequently treats tion of the following brief remark in them either as unworthy of his attenBlome's Brittannia, as the subject is tion, or as incapable of comprehendhighly interesting in the ancient his-ing, not merely logical disquisitions, tory of Liverpool, with which he seems but even simple moral truths. To to be well acquainted.

combat with such antagonists, is at BLOME.—“On the west side, upon once a difficult and an imposing task. the said river, (Mersey) is a stately If, in point of sterling sense, the advoand strong pile of building called the cate for truth be superior to the supTower, erected many hundred years porter of error, still that is not sufliago, by Sir Jo. de Stanley and his lady, cient: he must grapple with him pro who lye enter'd under their alablaster focis et armis; he must meet him on tombs.”

his own ground; he must refute by The interment of Sir John and his the application of incontrovertible lady here, seems to rest entirely on truths and first principles; he must not the evidence of this writer: neither walk around the moat of the capital of Camden, nor Leland, takes any no- Error, but he must scale the walls tice of it, or the monuments.

remove the sentinels-scour the outQuery. If Q, or any of your cor- works-enter the citadel, and there, respondents ever met with any account arm to arm, and foot to foot, must of it in any

other writer; or any gra- fight on till he conquers his enemy, or phic illustration of the monuments dies in the combat. But as, in military which existed, so late as 1673, when tactics, the wisdom of the general is Blome wrote?

developed in the election of the mode P.S. Query.By whom was the of his attack; so it is with the chamcarved work in St. Peter's church exe- pion for Truth: his learning, and skill, cuted, (between the years 1669, and and intellect, are more displayed in 1704,) consisting of palms, foliage, the method he pursues, in order to redoves, &c.; and a pelican, allusive to fute and convince, than in the arscripture history? This is well worthy rangement of his arguments when classthe attention of the admirers of the ed, or in the beauty of his language, Arts, and reflects an honour on the the chastity of his style, or the brilname of the artist, which, instead of liancy of his imagery. By the unskilremaining dubious and forgotten, is ful management of an army, many a deserving of being rescued from obli- campaign has been rendered nugatory; vion.

and by the ill-timed or ill-planned Yours, &c. efforts of well-meaning advocates for Liverpool, Aug. 10, 1819. W.I.R. truth, the cause of truth itself has

frequently been put in jeopardy, so that by undue concessions, or weak

and frivolous refutations, it has sufReview." The Edipus Romanus ; or fered more by its intended friends, an attempt to prove, from the prin- than by all the malice and raillery of ciples of reasoning adopted by the its enemies. Right Hon. Sir William Drummond

Mr. Townsend, in the work before in his dipus Judaicus, that the twelve Cæsars are the twelve Signs of be at once a learned, judicious, and

us, has, however, approved himself to the Zodiac. By the Rev. George skilful opponent to error. He has Townsend, A. M. of Trinity College, “ met Greek like Greek.” He has Cambridge. Hatchard, pp. 147, 8vo. adopted the ex absurdo method of prov: 78. 6d.

ing his argument, and we consider it Error never assumes a more danger- justifiable; but he has concealed it qus form, than when it is supported sufficiently to excite a feeling of atby learning and rank. Surrounded tention and interest; and has deveby the bulwarks of education and loped it sufficiently to prevent any science, the learned sophist braves the misconception or unfair deduction. storm of ridicule, or the shafts of | His argument has reminded us of a No.7,--VOL. I.

2T

TO THE EDITOR OF THE IMPERIAL

ment. How ridiculous the stern and

Reply to Critical Inquiries, fc. self - opiniated importance of the former! how disgusting the pride,

[Inserted No. 5.] ignorance and impertinence of the latter! Persons who barely comply

MAGAZINE, with the prescribed forms of decency SIR, and decorum, conceive themselves On lately perusing your valuable Misremarkably modest; forgetting that cellany, col. 419, I was attracted by the chief and component parts of this the title, “ Inquiries respecting some qualification, diffidence and humility, minute particulars of the English lanare essentially requisite. How ami- guage; and on cursorily perusing able is the youth, who, notwithstand those Inquiries, I strongly suspected ing the possession of superior abilities that your correspondent A. B. had and education, is diffident of his own mistaken Lindley Murray in some of opinion, and with modest deference his remarks. I therefore referred to attentively considers the remarks of that gentleman, and found that in his all ; or, even if he is not conspicuously Notes and Observations under Rule blessed with ability and education, 14, Syntax, he states, that particibut presumes not more than he pos- ples are sometimes governed by the sesses, still how praiseworthy is his Article ; for the present participle, with conduct! Contrast it with the bois- | the definite article the before it, beterous presumption of arrogance and comes a substantive, and must have ignorance, and behold more clearly the preposition of after it."

The senthe inestimable advantages resulting tence referred to by A. B. as coming from Modesty! The truly modest feel under this note, is the cause of my not less diffident of their own opinion, not receiving it.” But, Sir, what dethan fearful of too hastily and incon- finite article in this sentence comes siderately contradicting that of an- before the participle, in the way pointother: the delicacy of their own feel- ed out by Murray, so as to be said to goings induces them to be always watch-vern that participle? Now the, the only ful, lest they should incautiously definite article in the sentence, cannot wound the feelings of others. A sym- be said to do that, for it applies to its pathetic ardour pervades in the heart, particular substantive cause' and, by which they are at all times not only moreover, I understood Murray to inclined, but willing, to rejoice with mean (when he says before) immedithe fortunate, compassionate with the ately before ; so that the of in the sendistressed, bear with the pragmatical, tence, as amended by A. B., is an inand envy not the prudish. In short, terpolation, and quite ungrammatical, to use a paradoxical expression, Mo- according to Murray, as well as ineledesty is not what (in these days) it gant. As he has not given any referseems to be. It is not that mummery ence to a grammarian in his second of expression, that preciseness of form, objection, and as it appears really frithat stiffness of demeanour, which is volous, I shall pass it over. 'Tis true, so conspicuous in the middle and he says it is authorized by Mr. Murray higher classes of society ; neither is himself; but, qui quondam erravit rursus it to be discovered in that refined de- erret.

To licacy, which shrinks at the idea of The answer to the last objection will any open personal impropriety, or de- be allowed, I doubt not, on my referviation from established usage, but ring your correspondent to a similar which feels no remorse in privately dip- passage in the Latin tongue ; * Ubi ping its envenomed tongue in the cup ad Diana veneris ite ad dextram." Now of slander and detraction.

Diane here supplies the place of two Artificial Modesty may, wit?

s, the genitive and accusative; but degree of propriety, be ce

"ot Oy derstanding the our garments. Like the on and off'; we suit it place; so that it is un ledged, not to be

ole for a seeming sai

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641 Antiquities. - ReviewThe Edipus Romanaz. MR. EDITOR,

contradiotion and arriment Most likely, your antiquarian corre- rudely elevated w.ch 3 -P spondent Q, may, through the medium of his own mental "prim of your invaluable Miscellany, be with a superribione per a enabled to give the lovers of antiquity mon herd of his * TTand local information, some elucida- creatures:' ant un tion of the following brief remark in them either 24 Blome's Brittannia, as the subject is tion, or as mrasar highly interesting in the ancient his-ing, not meas. 19 tory of Liverpool, with which he seems but even - 2 to be well acquainted.

combat 3 ri BLOME.—“On the west side, upon once a d. frzne the said river, (Mersey) is a stately If, in priet. and strong pile of building called the cate for me Tower, erected many hundred years porter efter ago, by Sir Jo. de Stanley and his lady, cient: be 11. who lye enter'd under their alablaster foert et f'm.. tombs.”

his V2 r. The interment of Sir John and his the ??. lady here, seems to rest entirely on truth, arr. the evidence of this writer: neither walk any Camden, nor Leland, takes any no- ! Ers 1.: tice of it, or the monuments.

Query.If Q, or any of your core : respondents ever met with any accoun. nar: of it in any other writer; or any 2 itu n. phic illustration of the monuments which existed, so late as 1673, when Blome wrote?

P.S. Query.By whom was fine : carved work in St. Peter's church an cuted, (between the years 169. man auf pour 1704) consisting of palms, fins doves, &c.; and a pelican, alluns iue 2 scripture history? This is well 1 the attention of the admirers at 18 Arts, and reflects an honour 03.1 name of the artist, which, iDEAV sro remaining dubious and furen deserving of being rescu. Esmu vi 23. vion.

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skilful ambush; the enemy takes pos- collection of astronomical emblems;" session of the field not long since oc- or, in other words, “ that as things cupied by his antagonists; be sees no which are equal to the same thing are opponents, and he imagines they have equal to one another, the patriarchs retreated; but when he has pitched are the Cæsars, and the Cæsars the his camp, and himself and his veterans sons of Jacob, because they are both have concluded that the laurel and synonymous with the Zodiac.” cypres have been ceded to them as As to the principles of reasoning their right, then, from behind the am- adopted by Drummond, Mr. Townsend, buscade, the well-trained phalanx ad- however, remarks,“ Sir William has vance, and, by a timely and judicious invented a new mode of eliciting that scheme, change the scene of hilarity truth, which is the common object of and triumph into one of bondage and all who are not contented to think submission.

with the vulgar. Instead of looking That our readers may accurately ap- for moral arguments, and metaphysipreciate the merits of the interesting cal subtleties, he traces the goddess and important volume before us, we through all the living and dead lanconsider it necessary to premise, that guages, till he discovers her in the reit is intended as a refutation of a work, cesses of words, in the consonants of a entitled dipus Judaicus,” pub- radical, or in the remnant of a Zodiac." lished by Sir William Drummond, in That those principles of reasoning are 1812, the object of which was, ex- inaccurate, he leads his readers to dispressly, to prove, by etymological de- cover, from the absurdities which they ductions from the Hebrew and other will induce their disciples to believe, dead languages, that the facts record- and from the violations of every rule ed in the books of the Old Testament, of construing, believing, and deciding, were nothing more than allegories and which is acknowledged to be correct. fables. To meet such objections to Congruent with the plan of his work,Mr. Holy Writ, it must be evident is not Townsend, for the greater part of his in the capacity of every man, or even volume conceals his real object, which every scholar; but Mr. Townsend has is to refute error under the disguise of effected a task which but few were ca- a design to establish the before-menpable of accomplishing, and yet still tioned proposition. He thus expresses fewer willing to perform.

himself: (page 14.)“ The proposition, Amongst a variety of absurdities the truth of which I am anxious to contained in the “Edipus Judaicus, establish, is nearly the same as that perhaps there is none more flagrant of Sir William Drummond: to quote than that which Mr. Townsend has his own words, 'I pretend, that the anexposed. It is that of maintaining, cient Jews, like other nations of antiquity, that by the twelve tribes of Israel, had their esoteric and their exoteric docspoken of in the Pentateuch, were in- trines:' that is, the ancient Jews distended the twelve signs of the Zodiac; guised the history of the progress of for we agree with Mr. Townsend when astronomy, and the reform of the ca

though Sir William Drum- lendar, under the veil of simple narramond's professed object is to prove tion, and apparent matter of fact; and only that the standards of the twelve the mystery has never been solved till tribes were taken from the zodiacal the present day. The arguments on signs, “ he keeps the word of promise which the hypothesis is supported, are to the ear, and breaks it to the faith ;' derived from etymology, coincidence, for his arguments undoubtedly identify and tradition.” « I pretend that the the patriarchs themselves with these Roman historians, Tacitus, Suetonius, signs.” In order to combat this and &c. had their esoteric and exoteric every other objection, made by Sir W. doctrines; they are enigmatical writers, D. to the truth of the Old Testament, and concealed certain truths from the Mr. Townsend has undertaken to vulgar, under the disguise of a most shew, that from the principles of reason- candid and impartial statement of ing adopted by the author of Edipus facts. These truths, consequently, like Judaicus, it could be easily proved, the esoteric doctrines of the Jews, are “ that there is equal reason to believe generally unknown among their dethe twelve Cæsars to be the twelve scendants; like these, too, they do not signs of the Zodiac, as that the narra- even seem to have been understood tives of the Hebrew scriptures are a at the time they were written; a cira

he says,

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