Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub

22d. last year.

24

.....43

57

53

......51

....80

but the failure of several eminent Cotton-dealers in Manchester has thrown a gloom on the market, which it has not yet recovered. -The last prices were For Uplands or Boweds.. 12d. to 13 d.

20d, to
New Orleans.......

13
151

21
Sea Islands.....
2s, 1 2s. 10

33.3

4s. O
Pernambuco

18
19

2 1
Brazil

2 2 Maranhams

164

17 Cottons.

24 2 03
Bahia...

16
161
22

24 East India | Bengals

6
8
113

14 Cottons. Surats

7
9
16

23
The demand for Pot Ashes has been very moderate.
Pot Ashes.
Boston.

.44s. Od, to 45s. Od.- 58s. Od. to Os. last year.
New York.
6 44 6

0 0 Boston.. .52 6 53 0

58 6 59 Pearl Ashes. New York......52 0

0

58 0 59 Montreal..

0 52 0

58 0 0 Tobaccos have also felt the influence of the times--and our stock in this port is now 7395 hogsheads--there were only 3873 hogsheads at the corresponding season last year-aud prices are now fully 25 per cwt. lower.

East Indiu and West India Produce. The finer qualities of West India Sugars having become scarce, the want has been supplied by some imports of Bengal white Sugars, which have been sold at 82s. to 87s. for low to middling white qualities, and at 88s. to 90s. for finer sorts. Plantation Sugars, brown

.609. to 68s. 71s. to 78s. per cwt. last year. middling : .70 - 75 79 83 good to fine..

90

84 92 The last average price of Sugar, in the Gazette of the 16th Inst. was 44s. 11d. per cwt.-—and 18th April, 1818, 50s. 10 d. per cwt.--consequently this article rules 53. 11 d. per cwt. lower than in the preceding year.

Coffee has experienced a reverse more remarkable, considering the absence of all political causes.-Good ordinary Plantation Coffee sells now at 100s. to 105s. per cwt. wbich, within the last six months, was worth 150s. to 160s. per cwt. the rates are about on a par with those ruling last year.

Dyewoops have in some measure partaken of the depreciation attendant upon other articles. The last sales of

Jamaica Logwood were made at £7. to £7. 58.- £9. to £9. 5s. per ton. last year. Campeachy...

0 0

10 10 10 Fustic, Jamaica

8 10

13 14 0 Cuba ...

10 10

16 17 0 Miscellaneous Articles. The importations of Fruit of all kinds have been very abundant, and the produce of the fertile shores of the Mediterranean have been sold at rates below former years.

In Baltic produce, the fall of Tallow has been great, beyond precedent. Yellow candle is now saleable at 72s. to 73s. per. cwt. and at this period, in the preceding year, 80s. to 82s. and so lately as six months since it bad attained the height of 95s. to 988. Hemp is saleable at £47. to £49.

-£52. to £54. per ton, Flax..

72 0 GRAIN.- The open winter, which has equally prevailed in the North of Europe, has thrown an unusual early import of all kinds into the English market, so that prices of several sorts, such as of Barley, Oats, and Beans, have sastained a most serious depression. The ports have heen shut against the importation of Wheat since the 12th of February, and, from present appearances, they bid fair to close on the 12th of May, for all kinds of Grain : they will then remain closed until the 12th of August, against which time the character of the expected harvest may in some measure be anticipated.—The wheat, however, does not look well at present.—The closing of the ports may put a stop to the farther decline of Grain, which the heavy imports of Grain and Flour have lately contributed to effect, and wbich bas, no doubt, been accelerated by the numerous Auctions at our Corn Exchange every Market-day.

Best English Wheat may be quoted at 10s. to 11s. per bushel of 701b.-Dantzig and Foreign, 9s. 6d. to 10s. 60.--Irish, 9s. to 10s.-Rye, 30s. to 34s. per quarter.-Oats, 2s. 10d. to 3s. 6d. per bushel of 45lb.—Barley for grinding, 4s. to 4s. 3d. per 60lb.-Ditto for malting, 5s.6d. to 6s.—Beans, 34s. to 40s. per Winchester quarter.-Indian Corn, 3s. 4d. to 3s. 6d. per Winchester bushel.- Ainerican Flour, superfine sweet, 34s. to 38s.--sour, 30s. per barrel.

Irish Provisions are lower; and this, together with the fineness of the season, will have an effect upon Live Stock.

Liverpool, April 26, 1819.

8 8 10

R

last year.

73

80

PRINTED BY HENRY FISHER, CAXTON, LIVERPOOL,

Printer in Ordinary to His Majesty.

THE

Imperial Magazine ;

OR, COMPENDIUM OF RELIGIOUS, MORAL, & PHILOSOPHICAL KNOWLEDGE.

66

THE VALUE OF A BOOK IS TO BE ESTIMATED BY ITS USE."

A TOUR ro THE HEBRIDES, AND

less sublime than those of the HighHIGHLANDS OF SCOTLAND,

lands, still yielded sufficient to gratify [Never before published.]

curiosity, and to repay the traveller for

the inconveniences arising from their Preliminary Observations. - That chain investigation: and though fortune deof Lakes, which, extending from Fort nied us the pleasure of visiting two of William to Inverness, nearly insulates the principal islands, Icolmkill and the northern extremity of the High- Staffa; yet, in those we saw, we found lands of Scotland, had long attracted much to admire; and, as far as it remy attention. The wild grandeur of lated to the inhabitants of this inclethis country was associated, by fancy, ment region, much to deplore. with all the beauty of winding waters, After quitting the vessel, which had whose margin still bore the venerable accompanied us throughout our course remains of ancient forests, which once amidst the islands of the Hebrides, the spread over this mountainous tract.

remaining tour was performed on foot: The painting of the imagination, a mode best adapted for viewing the where we have no opportunity of cor- scenery of this country, and of which recting its errors, becomes fixed : we the inconveniences are at least balook forward to the time when we shall lanced by its advantages. The former visit those scenes, which have thus of these arise from the infrequency of been impressed on the mind, with inns, and from the necessity a traveller anxiety and impatience; and, over- is sometimes under, of taking up with looking all intervening obstacles, dwell accommodations of the worst possible with delight on a remote, and probably kind, at those places which are genea delusive representation. A former rally used as half-way houses; the cursory visit to the nearer part of this latter, as well for the before-mentioned picturesque country, had given a dou- reason, as the independence which ble edge to desire. The impressions, it gives, to those who are capable of though distant, which had been made bearing its fatigues. by the grandeur and magnificence of In my descriptions I have been raits parts, by the adventitious effects of ther more general than particular; as light and shadow, and by the powerful the impressions we feel at viewing a and the sublime effects of contrast grand and extensive scene are mostly arising from thence, were not yet obli- of that nature. Particular description, terated: they were remembered with a though it may give some idea of the degree of pleasure, heightened by the relative situations of objects, should intervening lapse of time, which had be used with caution. In striking meliorated every scene with the co- scenes, the effect we mean to produce louring of faney, and softened every is often lost in the detail; and, to a asperity and difficulty of the research. person wholly unacquainted with the

My first intention was to enter Scot- part described, frequently becomes land by the way of Greenock; to cross tiresome and obscure. by Dumbarton to the grand scenery of Throughout, I have endeavoured to Loch Lomond; passing on by the beau- be more faithful than splendid ; to delitiful situation of Inverary to Loch Awe; neate Nature as I beheld her; and to from thence, by a circuitous route, to avoid exaggerated description, which visit Glencoe, Fort William, Inverness, can only tend to give false ideas of that the celebrated scenes of the Dee, and which ought to appear as near as possito conclude with the fal of the Clyde. ble in its native garb. The disadvan

The kind offer of a gentleman of tage arising from this circumstance, Liverpool, induced me to enlarge my must, however, be outweighed by its intended tour, by accompanying him propriety; as plain unadorned truth in a voyage to the Hebrides.

will ever be superior to embellished The latter, though affording scenes fiction, No. 3.- VOL. I.

0

22d. last year.

Cottons. Bahia...

Os. last year.

......70

- 75

but the failure of several eminent Cotton-dealers in Manchester has thrown a gloom on the market, which it has not yet recovered. The last prices were For Uplands or Boweds.. 12d. to

13 d.

20d, to
New Orleans.....

13
157

21

24
Sea Islands,
2s. 1 28. 10

3s. 3

4s. O Pernambuco

18

191 2 1
Brazil

2 2
Maranhams
161 17

24 2 03
16
163
22

24 East India | Bengals.

6
8
111

14 Cottons. Surats .

7
9
16

23 The demand for Pot Ashes has been very moderate.

.44s. Od. to 45s, Od.
s Boston.....

583. Od, to
Pot Ashes.
| New York.. 43 6 44 6

57 0

0 Boston..... .52 6 53 0

58 6 59 Pearl Asbes. New York......02 0 53 0

58 0 59 Montreal.......51 0 52 0

58 0 0 Tobaccos have also felt the influence of the times--and our stock in this port is now 7395 hogsheads--there were only 3873 hogsheads at the corresponding season last year-aud prices are now fully 25 per cwt. lower.

East India and West India Produce.—The finer qualities of West India Sugars having become scarce, the want has been supplied by some imports of Bengal white Sugars, which have been sold at 82s. to 87s. for low to middling white qualities, and at 888. to 90s. for finer sorts. Plantation Sugars, brown

60% to 688.- 71s. to 78s. per cwt. last year. middling

79 83 good to fine......80 90

84 92 The last average price of Sugar, in the Gazette of the 16th Inst. was 44s. 11d. per cwt.—and 181h April, 1818, 50s. 10 d. per cwt.--consequently this article rules 5s. 11 d. per cwt. lower than in the preceding year.

Coffee has experienced a reverse more remarkable, considering the absence of all political causes.--Good ordinary Plantation Coffee sells now at 100s. to 105s. per cwt. wbich, within the last six months, was worth 150s. to 160s. per cwt. the rates are about on a par with those ruling last year.

Dyewoods have in some measure partaken of the depreciation attendant upon other articles.
The last sales of

Jamaica Logwood were made at £7. to £7. 5s.- £9. to £9. 5s. per ton. last year.
Campeachy....

8 0 0

10 10 10 Fustic, Jamaica

8 8 10 13 14 0 Cuba.

10 10 10

16 17 0 Miscellaneous Articles.—The importations of Fruit of all kinds have been very abundant, and the produce of the fertile shores of the Mediterranean have been sold at rates below former years.

In Baltic produce, the fall of Tallow has been great, beyond precedent.--Yellow candle is now saleable at 72s. to 73s. per. cwt. and at this period, in the preceding year, 80s. to 82s. and so lately as six months since it had attained the height of 95s. to 988.

Hemp is saleable at £47. to £49.~~£52. to £54. per ton, last year.
Flax....

73 80- 72 0 GRAIN.—The open winter, which has equally prevailed in the North of Europe, has thrown an unusual early import of all kinds into the English market, so that prices of several sorts, such as of Barley, Oats, and Beans, have sostained a most serious depression. The ports have heen shut against the importation of Wheat since the 12th of February, and, from present appearances, they bid fair to close on the 12th of May, for all kinds of Grain : they will then remain closed until the 12th of August, against which time the character of the expected harvest may in some measure be anticipated. The wheat, however, does not look well at present.—The closing of the ports may put a stop to the farther decline of Grain, which the heavy imports of Grain and Flour have lately contributed to effect, and which bas, no doubt, been accelerated by the numerous Auctions at our Corn Exchange every Market-day.

Best English Wheat may be quoted at 10s. to 11s. per bushel of 70lb.-Dantzig and Foreign, 9s. 60. to 10s. 60.--Irish, 9s. to 10s.-Rye, 30s. to 34s. per quarter.—Dais, 2s. 10d. to 3s. 6d. per bushel of 45lb.— Barley for grinding, 4s. to 4s. 3d. per 60lb.-Ditto for malting, 5s.6d. to 65.—Beans, 34s. to 40s. per Winchester quarter.-Indian Corn, 3s. 4d. to 3s. 6d. per Winchester bushel.-Ainerican Flour, superfine sweet, 34s. to 38s.--sour, 30s. per barrel.

Irish Provisions are lower; and this, together with the fineness of the season, will bave an effect upon Live Stock.

Liverpool, April 26, 1819.

[ocr errors]

PRINTED BY HENRY FISHER, CAXTON, LIVERPOOL,

Printer in Ordinary to His Majesty.

THE

Imperial Magazine ;

OR, COMPENDIUM OF RELIGIOUS, MORAL, & PHILOSOPHICAL KNOWLEDGE.

“ the VALUE OF A BOOK IS TO BE ESTIMATED BY ITS USE."

| less sublime than those of the HighA TOUR TO THE HEBRIDES, AND HIGHLANDS OF SCOTLAND.

lands, still yielded sufficient to gratify [Never before published.]

curiosity, and to repay the traveller for

the inconveniences arising from their Preliminary Observations. — That chain investigation: and though fortune deof Lakes, which, extending from Fort nied us the pleasure of visiting two of William to Inverness, nearly insulates the principal islands, Icolmkill and the northern extremity of the High- Staffa; yet, in those we saw, we found lands of Scotland, had long attracted much to admire; and, as far as it remy attention. The wild grandeur of lated to the inhabitants of this inclethis country was associated, by fancy, ment region, much to deplore. with all the beauty of winding waters, After quitting the vessel, which had whose margin still bore the venerable accompanied us throughout our course remains of ancient forests, which once amidst the islands of the Hebrides, the spread over this mountainous tract. remaining tour was performed on foot:

The painting of the imagination, a mode best adapted for viewing the where we have no opportunity of cor- scenery of this country, and of which recting its errors, becomes fixed: we the inconveniences are at least balook forward to the time when we shall lanced by its advantages. The former visit those scenes, which have thus of these arise from the infrequency of been impressed on the mind, with inns, and from the necessity a traveller anxiety and impatience; and, over- is sometimes under, of taking up with looking all intervening obstacles, dwell accommodations of the worst possible with delight on a remote, and probably kind, at those places which are genea delusive representation. A former rally used as half-way houses; the cursory visit to the nearer part of this latter, as well for the before-mentioned picturesque country, had given a dou- reason, as the independence which ble edge to desire. The impressions, it gives, to those who are capable of though distant, which had been made bearing its fatigues. by the grandeur and magnificence of In my descriptions I have been raits parts, by the adventitious effects of ther more general than particular; as light and shadow, and by the powerful the impressions we feel at viewing a and the sublime effects of contrast grand and extensive scene are mostly arising from thence, were not yet obli- of that nature. Particular description, terated: they were remembered with a though it may give some idea of the degree of pleasure, heightened by the relative situations of objects, should intervening lapse of time, which had be used with caution. In striking meliorated every scene with the co- scenes, the effect we mean to produce louring of faney, and softened every is often lost in the detail; and, to a asperity and difficulty of the research. person wholly unacquainted with the

My first intention was to enter Scot- part described, frequently becomes land by the way of Greenock; to cross tiresome and obscure. by Dumbarton to the grand scenery of Throughout, I have endeavoured to Loch Lomond; passing on by the beau- be more faithful than splendid ; to delitiful situation of Inverary to Loch Awe; neate Nature as I beheld her; and to from thence, by a circuitous route, to avoid exaggerated description, which visit Glencoe, Fort William, Inverness, can only tend to give false ideas of that the celebrated scenes of the Dee, and which ought to appear as near as possito conclude with the falls of the Clyde. ble in its native garb. The disadvan

The kind offer of a gentleman of tage arising from this circumstance, Liverpool, induced me to enlarge my must, however, be outweighed by its intended tour, by accompanying him propriety; as plain unadorned truth in a voyage to the Hebrides.

will ever be superior to embellished The latter, though affording scenes fiction. No. 3.-VOL. I.

0

JOURNAL OF Á VOYAGE TO THE of the rocks, which form suchi natural HEBRIDES.

and commodious harbours, where boats We sailed from Liverpool on Sunday might lie safely and concealed when it the 19th of June, 1796, on board a would be nearly impossible for any sloop of about 100 tons burden, which, vessel to keep sea, are such manifest being in ballast, and fitted up for the advantages, that it was not probable purpose, was admirably adapted for our they would ever be overlooked or abancoasting voyage.

doned, whilst existing circumstances The favourable breeze which had rendered the risk so extremely profittempted us to sail, soon became ad-able. verse, and rendered our progress tedi- Coasting along the shore in fine weaous and unpleasant through those intri-ther affords some tolerably grand specate channels, which at once form the cimens of rocky scenery, which the dangers and the security of this har- turbulent seas, that so frequently break bour. The sand bank's extend for on these coasts, have rendered sufmany miles from the mouths of the ficiently craggy and disjointed. In the Mersey and Dee; and as some of them back ground, the hills rise to a great frequently change their places, from height, and are frequently enveloped the action of currents setting through in clouds: a remarkable one, of a conithe ebb channels or swashes, they can- cal shape, ascends abruptly from benot be passed without a pilot, or one hind the town of Ramsey. These much accustomed to the navigation. eminences give a degree of spirit to

We were for some time accompanied scenery, which has in general very little by a great variety of vessels, which aid from fertility. I speak only of its had taken advantage of the favourable external appearance ; an inland view wind; which, while they naturally in- might probably vary its aspect conspired reflections on the growing opu- siderably. lence of this famous commercial port, The bays of Ramsey and Douglas pleasingly broke the uniformity of the are capacious, but open to the easterly scene, by the various combinations and winds; there is, however, good anchorgroups into which their adverse tracks age, and each has a small harbour were continually forming them. adjacent to the town, where vessels of

At length, after an ineffectual strug- a moderate burden 'may lie in perfect gle of some hours, the greater part security. returned ; and we were left to pursue On this coast, that engagement took our almost solitary course, through a place, in which the daring Thurot wet and disagreeable evening, and a found the punishment of his temerity, tempestuous night.

after having for a length of time esMonday, 20th.-- In the morning we caped with impunity; and Ramsey Bay made the entrance of Ramsey Bay, in at once embraced within its wide exthe Isle of Man, but owing to the vio- tent the victorious and the vanquished lence of the gale, we were unable to fleets. run in ; and, after vainly lying to for Wednesday, 22d. — By two in the some time in the hope of its becoming morning we reached the Mull of Galmoderate, we were at length compelled loway, and were becalmed, during the to bear away for Douglas Bay; where forenoon, under the low but rugged we came to anchor, and passed another coast of Wigtownshire, near Port equally stormy night.

Patrick; which seems as well adapted Tuesday, 21st.- In the afternoon the for the purposes of smuggling as wind became favourable, and we im- that of the Isle of Man, and of which, mediately set sail, passing again by report says, the inhabitants were by no Ramsey Bay and the point Ayr, the means ignorant. northern extremity of the Isle, and The morning had been extremely directing our course to the Mull of misty ; but a transient gleam now and Galloway.

then broke through, and rested on the The coast of this island, as far as remote hills of Ireland, which seemed, we had an opportunity of observing it, as far as the distance would permit us appears extremely rugged and bold, to judge, to be in a high state of cultiand well adapted to the purposes of vation. that contraband trade, which used to The tranquil state of the water, be formerly carried on' by some of its which extended to its shores like an inhabitants. The frequent indentings I immense mirror, had a pleasing effect,

« ForrigeFortsæt »