The History of Ireland: From the Treaty of Limerick to the Present Time : Being a Continuation of the History of the Abbé MacGeoghegan

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Cameron, Ferguson, 1869 - 568 sider
 

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Side 193 - I also declare, that it is not an article of the catholic faith; neither am I thereby required to believe or profess that the pope is infallible, or that I am bound to obey any order in its own nature immoral, though the pope or any ecclesiastical power should issue or direct such order, but on the contrary, I hold that it would be sinful in me to pay any respect or obedience thereto...
Side 111 - ... that it is not by temporary expedients, but by a free trade alone, that this nation is now to be saved from impending ruin.
Side 175 - To subvert the tyranny of our execrable Government, to break the connection with England, the never-failing source of all our political evils, and to assert the independence of my country — these were my objects. To unite the whole people of Ireland, to abolish the memory of all past dissensions, and to substitute the common name of Irishman in place of the denominations of Protestant, Catholic, and Dis* Thomas Russell, Tone's most intimate friend and comrade. HISTORY Of IRELAND. senter — these...
Side 40 - In short, he was like Mr. Wood, all over brass, and he defied the armies of the living God. Goliah's conditions of combat were likewise the same with those of Wood : " if he prevail against us, then shall we be his servants." But if it happens that I prevail over him, I renounce the other part of the condition; "he shall never be a servant of mine ; for I do not think him fit to be trusted in any honest man's shop.
Side 10 - Second : and their majesties, as soon as their affairs will permit them to summon a parliament in this kingdom, will endeavour to procure the said Roman Catholics such further security in that particular, as may preserve them from any disturbance upon the account of their said religion.
Side 36 - ... kingdom ; and that all proceedings before the said House of Lords upon any such judgment, sentence or decree, are, and are hereby declared to be utterly null and void, to all intents and purposes whatsoever.
Side 161 - ... grievously whipped and burned through the gristle of the right ear with a hot iron of the compass of an inch about, as a manifestation of his wicked life, and due punishment received for the same.
Side 36 - Britain; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Side 21 - Parliament in England, in the first year of the reign of their late Majesties King William and Queen Mary, intituled An Act declaring the rights and liberties of the Subject and settling the Succession of the Crown...
Side 71 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton ; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...

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