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souls. We understand that the Committee of the College are open to applications for admission from two or three young men of Gentile extraction, who are willing to devote themselves to the work of Israel's evangelisation. Are there none of the former on whose ears this intelligence shall fall like the sound of the trumpet, summoning to battle? Perhaps some, whose souls are burning with indignation at the wrongs which have been inflicted on this unbappy people, will be ready to avail themselves of the opportunity afforded of remedying the misèries under which they have groaned; and, by an eminently practical and

most noble form of sympathy, testify their sense of the obligations under which the Gentile world is laid to those who are too often treated as the offscouring of the earth. The“ Herald” will fall into the hands of many pastors, parents, and guardians of youth, who are themselves deeply interested in the work of mercy to the Jews. Will they place this paper in the hands of their young people, and make the subject of it the theme of conversation in the social circle; and above all, lay the matter before God in prayer, that he would raise up from among the children of the strangers those who shall be the means of bearing the tidings of eternal life to them “whose are the fathers, and of whom, as concerning the flesh, Christ came;" but who are perishing-perishing eternally, for “lack of knowledge,” and because “no man careth for their souls?” “Send, Lord, by the hands of him whom thou wilt send !”

“ Would God, all the Lord's people were prophets !"

CONVERSION OF A JEW AT LEIPSIC. A POOR student, of the University of Leipsic, having occasion to undertake a journey to his distant friends, was in want of the necessary money for that purpose. He therefore was induced to go to a Jew, to pawn his Hebrew Bible and Greek Testament.

The latter contained the Greek and German text, in opposite columns.

The Jew, who was a learned man, little as he valued this book, was, however, prevailed upon to give the student half a rixdollar for it. During the absence of the student, he undertook to read it through, with a view to confirm his mind in enmity against Jesus, to ridicule his person in the synagogue, and to be the better prepared to testify his zeal for the Jewish faith.

His wife and children were not per

doubt of the issue. We flatter ourselves that the intelligence conveyed from time to time to the Christian Church, by means of this periodical, cannot fail to be deeply interesting, and that were this intelligence more widely spread, a much larger number of readers and helpers would be created. It is in the power of the subscribers to the “Herald” to extend its circulation by recommending it to their friends and acquaintance. Its cheapness, the neatness with which it is got up, and the interest and value of its contents, warrant us in believing that, once introduced to the notice of those who are yet strangers to its pages, it would soon secure their countenance and enlist their support to our Society. And never wås there a greater necessity for an extension of our constituency than at the present moment.* Openings for usefulness in connexion with the Jews are presenting themselves continually to our notice; but it is a matter of grave consideration, whether the Committee shall avail themselves of them. It certainly would not be prudent to do so, without a great probability of a larger income than the Society at present enjoys.

While aware of the existence of other and appropriate means to increase the funds, the Editor would earnestly commend the subject of a more extended circulation of our periodical, as one, and a very important means to be used, towards the realisation of greater pecuniary help than at present is received,-it being the vehicle of that kind of intelligence which the church needs to stimulate it to engage in the work of Israel's evangelisation.

We shall be glad to enlist the pens, as well as the thoughts and sympathies of our friends, in conducting the "Herald;" and beg to suggest to their consideration a few queries, answers to which we shall be happy to receive from our meditative readers :

What is the best mode of interesting and instructing a Bible Class of young people in the spiritual condition of the Jews ?”

• How should the conversion of the Jews be regarded in connexion with efforts for the conversion of the heathen ?”

“What is our duty as Christians (churches and individuals) towards newly-converted Israelites ?"

* Collectors to the amount of Forty Shillings yearly, are entitled to a copy of the “Herald,” which can be had by application at the Office, or of any of the local secretaries.

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Soliciting the prayers, as well as the co-operation of our friends in the work in which we are engaged; and sustained and cheered by renewed hopes, we journey forth with them afresh, upon the untrodden path of another year.

THE JEWISH MISSION COLLEGE.

AN APPÉAL TO GENTILE CHRISTIANS TO DEVOTE THEMSELVES TO

THE SERVICE OF CHRIST IN CONNEXION WITH THE EVANGELI

SATION OF THE JEWS.

The Committee and friends of our Society have, with good reason, regarded this institution for the training of teachers as one of the most important parts of the machinery they have put into operation, for bringing the children of Abraham to receive the gospel of Christ. In these days, when miracles are neither wrought nor expected, fitness for important duties in the Church of God, like suitableness for any other engagement, can only be acquired by painstaking preparations, pursued with that perseverance and industry which the magnitude of the work, and the infinitely momentous results that spring from it, imperatively demand.

The least reflection will show, that for the work of preaching the gospel to the Jews, a line of preparatory studies, deviating from the usual course pursued by aspirants to the Christian ministry, must be resolved on. The Jewish missionary has most frequently to assume an antagonistic position; to defend as much as to assail; to deal with subtle questions, often skilfully put, and maintained with amazing pertinacity and vehemence, and with some amount of dialectic skill, by the adherents to Rabbinical Theology.

To meet such persons on their own grounds, and, if possible, to contend with them with their own weapons, it is indisputably requisite that a well-established acquaintance with Rabbinical literature should form part of the training of the men who are to be the champions of the Crucified One against the people who have rejected him. This it is necessary should be done to a much greater extent than is usual, or generally practicable, with those who expect to be engaged with the Gentile mind, under the various phases of indifference, ignorance, or idolatry, as seen in nominally Christian countries, or where Paganism is enthroned in high places.

The establishment of the Jewish Mission College has, up to the present time, realised the hopes and expectations of its founders and supporters. Under the able direction of its tutors, young men who have enjoyed its advantages have been diligently preparing for active labour: and a pleasing testimony has been borne, from time to time, to their persevering and studious habits, both by the gentlemen under whose care they are placed, and by the several examiners, who, after rigid, minute, and patient inquiries, have pronounced unequivocal approval of the labours, both of the teachers and the taught.

Six of these young men are soon to leave the College, to enter upon the work for which they have been there preparing. It is to us a source of great gratification that they will go forth with high testimonials from their tutors, as to piety and proficiency; and we trust that the Great Head of the Church, whose servants they are, will vouchsafe to them early tokens of his having called them into his vineyard to labour for the Truth.

One word to those who sympathise with us in this work. Shall these means of usefulness, which have begun so auspiciously, be continued, and become yet more extensively useful ? Shall a course of preparation, which we think indispensable to the right furnishing of the Jewish Missionary for his work, be perpetuated ? Surely there is but one reply to be given, and we need do no more than intimate to our friends, that we are waiting their generous aid to a yet further extent, in order to carry on efficiently these Collegiate operations. Openings for usefulness in connexion with the Jews are presenting themselves in many

directions. Will any, with whom is the gold and the silver, who have received through the hands of those who were Jews the priceless treasure of God's Word, and had unfolded to them glorious visions of light and felicity, which illuminate, with a fadeless splendour, the horizon of their souls, aid in this good work? We are content to leave the simple announcement of the fact that we are now waiting for help to go forward in this important work, to the prayerful and earnest consideration of our friends.

Before we conclude this paper, we are anxious for a moment to gain the attention of pious and devoted Christian young men, whom God has endowed with abilities to receive and propagate knowledge, to the claims of the Jews upon their sympathy and co-operation, in the work of seeking to save their souls. We understand that the Committee of the College are open to applications for admission from two or three young men of Gentile extraction, who are willing to devote themselves to the work of Israel's evangelisation. Are there none of the former on whose ears this intelligence shall fall like the sound of the trumpet, summoning to battle? Perhaps some, whose souls are burning with indignation at the wrongs which have been inflicted on this unhappy people, will be ready to avail themselves of the opportunity afforded of remedying the misèries under which they have groaned; and, by an eminently practical and most noble form of sympathy, testify their sense of the obligations under which the Gentile world is laid to those who are too often treated as the offscouring of the earth. The “ Herald” will fall into the hands of many pastors, parents, and guardians of youth, who are themselves deeply interested in the work of mercy to the Jews. Will they place this paper

in the hands of their young people, and make the subject of it the theme of conversation in the social circle; and above all, lay the matter before God in prayer, that he would raise up from among the children of the strangers those who shall be the means of bearing the tidings of eternal life to them “whose are the fathers, and of whom, as concerning the flesh, Christ came;" but who are perishing—perishing eternally, for “lack of knowledge,” and because

no man careth for their souls?” “Send, Lord, by the hands of him whom thou wilt send !”

“ Would God, all the Lord's people were prophets !"

CONVERSION OF A JEW AT LEIPSIC. A POOR student, of the University of Leipsic, having occasion to undertake a journey to his distant friends, was in want of the necessary money for that purpose. He therefore was induced to go to a Jew, to pawn his Hebrew Bible and Greek Testament.

The latter contained the Greek and German text, in opposite columns.

The Jew, who was a learned man, little as he valued this book, was, however, prevailed upon to give the student half a rixdollar for it. During the absence of the student, he undertook to read it through, with a view to confirm his mind in enmity against Jesus, to ridicule his person in the synagogue, and to be the better prepared to testify his zeal for the Jewish faith. His wife and children were not per

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