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Annual Announcement.

Twenty-Seventh Session, Fall and Winter of 1869-70,

Commencing October 5, 1869, and to continue until the last of

February, 1870.

It is with feelings of great satisfaction that the Trustees of the CINCINNATI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY make the Announcement of the Twenty-Seventh Course of Lectures in that Institution. The College has come to the close of another year, with a rapidly-increasing number of pupils and graduates; its means of illustration and demonstration will be largely increased by new additions during the present season; its great practical chairs are now all filled by men of large experience, and who possess, in an eminent degree, the happy faculty of teaching others; anatomical material may be had here in great abundance ; the immense clinical advantages of the largest general hospital in our country, are open to all medical students on the most liberal terms; in a word, everything conspires to indicate that Cincinnati, on account of its large population, easy access and central position, is destined to become a great centre of medical science and teaching, and that the Cincinnati College-whose Faculty are so fully imbued with the noble aims of their high professionwill soon take a leading position among the medical schools of our country.

It will be seen that one of the peculiarities of this school is the LOWNESS OF ITS FEES. While we advocate a reputable preliminary education, the complete curriculum of studies, the full term of pupilage, two full courses of lectures, and are anxious to further any effort to give depth and extension to medical education; on the other hand, we are disposed to open wide the portals of science; to withdraw, as far as practicable, all pecuniary obstacles ;

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CINCINNATI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY.

and to encourage all young men, however humble, to enter the arena of professional life, who feel the promptings of a noble ambition stirring within them. In following this course, we think we are advancing in accordance with the generous spirit of our age and country, which is everywhere opening free libraries and lecture rooms, and building school houses for the million. The lives of such men as Drake and Eberle, of Hunter and Velpean, are positive proof that poverty is often associated with the highest ability. Their brilliant career has given a forward impulse to science, and served to dignify and ennoble the profession with which they were connected. A me lical college established upon such a liberal basis in a large city, where clinical advantages can be secured, will do much to arrest the tendency to open medical schools in small cities and towns, where this essential part of medical education must of necessity be neglected. Our school, we are persuaded, is rapidly introducing into the profession a new, energetic, and life-giving element--one which will do quite as much to advance the cause of science, and quite as much to maintain the dignity of the profession, as will be found to come out of those institutions where the size of the head is to be measured by the length of the purse; but which atford a happy faculty of accommodation, by dividing their pupils into the fullpay class, the note makers, and the beneficiaries.

THE CINOINNATI HOSPITAL This Institution, which so elegantly adorns the northern part of our city, and which has been erected by the expenditure of a million of dollars, is now open for all classes of patients—an honor to our city, and acknowledged to lie at once the most elegant, extensive, and best appointed general Hospital in our country Here are found fever wards, Ophthalmie warils, obstetrical wards, venereal wards, and surgical warris; in fact, here may be seen almost every disease that tlesh is heir to, its nature studied, and the results of treatment witnessel. Among the numerous surgical operations performed there during the last season, we may mention amputations of the arm, leg, circumcision, excision of tunors, hemeroids, ligature of main arteries, lithotomy, vesicovaginal fistula, hare-lip), hydrocele, lacerateri perineun, paracen tesis abdominis and thoracis, removal of bullets and dead bone, a great variety of operations on the eye, etc, etc. In a word, the

student may here enjoy, as at Vienna, the advantage of seeing all manner of disease in a general hospital, and does not, as in New York and Philadelphia, have to spend a large portion of his time in running over the city from one hospital to another.

At the close of the winter term six house physicians are appointed for this Institution, and all graduates have an opportunity of competing for these positions.

CLINICAL LECTURES, Clinical Lectures are delivered daily during the course of the session by the medical statf.

PRACTICAL ANATOMY. The most liberal provisions are made for the prosecution of this very important branch.

Anatomical material is supplied in abun lance, and at low rates.

The dissecting room is commodious, well lighted and well ventilated, and provided with everything requisite for comfort and convenience. It will be openel early in the session, and will be under the direction of J. W. UNDERHILL, M. D., a highly competent instructor.

THE COLLEGE BUILDING. The college building is situated on the north-west corner of Longworth street and Central Avenue. The lecture rooms are well lightel, freely ventilated, comfortable and convenient.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION. The can lidate must be twenty-one years of age, and must present proper testimonials of a good moral character, and satisfactory evidence that he has studied merlicine for three years with a physician and surgeon duly anthorized by law to practice his profession. He must have attended tvo full courses of lec'tures-the last of which must have been in this coege. He must pass a satisfactory examination, and submit to the Faculty of the College an acceptable thesis on some suoject connected with inedicine or his own composition.

Four years practice will he considered as equivalent to attendance on one course of Lectures, a certificate of which must be presented at the time of matriculating, or bandel in with the thesis.

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CINCINNATI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY.

TEXT BOOKS. Principles and Practice - Watson, Flint, Billing's Principles. Surgery

Erichsen, Druitt. Obstetrics.

Bedford, Miller. Diseases of Women.

Hodge, Bedford, Thomas Diseases of Children.

West, Condie. Materia Medica..

Stille, U. S. Dispensatory Physiology

-Carpenter, Dalton, Marshall. Insanity

Winslow, Ray, Maudsley. Anatomy

-Gray, Wilson. Forensic Medicine.

- Taylor, Beck Ophthalmology

Lawrence, Jones, Wells.

FEES. The Faculty of this College maintain, and they believe they will be sustained by a right thinking community, that the true method to elevate the Profession is to do away, as far as possible, with pecuniary obstacles in entering it, and to place at a high standard the attainments necessary for graduation. Actuated by such considerations, the Faculty have placed the fees at the lowest rates consistent with the interests of the school. Professors' Tickets

$25 00 Matriculation.-

5 00 Demonstrator's Ticket.

5 00 Hospital Ticket...

5 00 Graduation Fee..

25 00

BOARDING. Good boarding and room can probably be had in Cincinnati at less rates than in any other large city in the United States. Students by calling at the College immediately on their arrival, will be aided in procuring suitable places of boarding

SPRING COURSE. This Course of Lectures will begin March 8th, 1870, and continue until the last week in June following: It will be a complete course by the Faculty, and will be followed by the usual examinations, and conferring degrees.

For further particulars address,

B. S. LAWSON, M. D., Dean,

No. 353 West Seventh St., Cincinnati.

OF THE

CINCINNATI COLLEGE

Medicine and Surgery,

In 1869.

WAME. AVICK, M. L.

INDERSON, J. B.
ALLEX, John H.
BROWNE, E. B. M.
BEARD, HENRY C.
BELL, JAMES R.
BRAJBLE, Lee Roy
CADDY, W. E.
CRAIG, S. W.
DESMAN, II. B.
FERGUSON, HUGI
GEORGE, W. M.
GILTENAN, JAMES J.
HOBBS, WILSON
KESLER, WM. HI.
KEIFER, EDWIN G.
LYND, CIAS, A.
MATSON, Jxo. T.
MCDONALD, Jos. E.
MARTIN, F.P.
MOZEE, B. B.
MERCER, M.C.
MCCULLOUGH, H. F.
MCINTOSH, A. J.
MCFEELY, T.
MCKINNOX, J. A.
POTTER, B. B.
PROTZMAN, S.
PUTT, FRANKLIN L.
ROYER, S. M.
ROBINS, J. Q. A.
RIFE, Jxo.J.
RUPE, RICHARD B.
STYGER. EIGENE DE
SUITII, T.J.
SCOTT, J. T.
SEATON, 1. M.
STUBBEMAX, F.
STUTZMAN, J. M.
SMITH, Wm. K.
STRICKLAND, Jis. S.
THOMAS, F. M.
Wood, W. F.
WELLS, CHAS. T.
WELCH, Joun M.

YELTON, W. H.

THESES.

RESIDENCE.
Forces of the Venous Scipio, Ind.

Circulation,
Nicotine and its Effects. New Haven, Ind.
Antimony,

Cynthiana, Ind.
Blood,

Cincinnati, O.
Dysentery,

Pike, Co. (.
Pertussis,

Zanesville, O.
Ch. Infantum.

Cincinnati, O.
Pneumonia,

Belmore. 0.
Erysipelas,

Cincinnati, O.
Phthisis,

Piqua, 0.
Labor,

Maxville, O.
Abortion,

Fairview, 0.
Convulsions,

Cincinnati, O.

Ohio.
Dislocations,

West Milton, 0.
Chorea,

Fairfield, 0.
Med. History,

Cincinnati. O.
Diphtheria,

Rising Sun, Ind.
Scarlatina,

Ashland Co. 0.
Dysentery,

Matamoris, 0.
Diagnosis,

Cordova, Ky.
Puerp. Fever,

Fairfield, 0.
Opium,

Lavonia, Ind.
Mam. Abscess,

Armstrong, III.
Rheumatism,

Newport, Ky.
Management of Infant Oak Harbor, o.
Hæmoptysis,

Roundhead, O.
Burns,

Yellow Springs, O.
Rem. Fever,

Berlin, O.
Erysipelas,

Williamsburg, Pa.
Typhoid Fever,

Abington, Ind.
Convulsions,

Boston, Ind.
Croup,

Pleasant Hill, Ky.
Cholera Infantuun. Milton, Ky.
Int. Fever,

Wakatomica, O.
Pertussis,

Rutland, Ky.
Dysentery,

Midway, 0.
Tracheitis,

Cincinnati, O.
Tracheitis,

Yellow Springs, 0.
Placenta Præria,

Deersville, O.
Meduila Oblongata. Hardensburg, Ind.
Bronchitis,

Scott, 0.
Pneumonia,

V. Bremen, O.
Measles,

Washington, Ind.
Ergot,

Deersville, O.
Conduct of Accoucheur, Bradford, Ky.

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