The Classic Myths in English Literature and in Art Based Originally on Bulfinch's "Age of Fable" (1855) Accompanied by an Interpretative and Illustrative Commentary, Bind 10

Forsideomslag
Charles Mills Gayley
Ginn, 1911 - 597 sider
 

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This was my favorite book of classical myths growing up. It has a reference style of layout, rather than the story style of Edith Hamilton's book. It presents the various gods in a fairly systematic ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

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Side 332 - sprung*! Eternal summer gilds them yet, But all, except their sun, is set. See Milton's Sonnet, " I did but prompt the age to quit their clogs," for allusion to Latona. In Art. In the shrine of Latona in Delos there was, in the days of
Side 332 - isles of Greece ! the isles of Greece 1 Where burning Sappho loved and sung, Where grew the arts of war and peace, Where Delos rose, and Phcebus sprung*! Eternal summer gilds them yet, But all, except their sun, is set.
Side 330 - the Nativity, and in lines of solemn and elevated beauty pictures the consternation of the heathen idols at the advent of the Saviour: The Oracles are dumb ; No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving. Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving. No nightly trance, or breathed spell
Side 330 - 740: From morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith, like a falling star, On Lemnos, the ^gean isle.
Side 335 - The last star in the tail of the Little Bear is the Polestar, or Cynosure (dog's tail). Illustrative. Milton's " Let my lamp, at midnight hour, Be seen in some high lonely tower, Where I may
Side 340 - (the daughter of Ceres): Proserpina. Larissa: a city of Thessaly, on the river Peneiis. Illustrative. Milton's sonnet, On his Deceased Wife: Methought I saw my late espoused saint Brought to me like Aleestis from the grave, Whom Jove's great son to her glad husband gave, Rescued from death by force, though pale and faint.
Side 330 - Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving. Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving. No nightly trance, or breathed spell Illustrative. Spenser, Faerie Queene, 1,2,2; i, 2, 29; i,
Side xxxiii - and his Ode to Napoleon Buonaparte. All is but a symbol painted Of the Poet, Prophet, Seer; Only those are crowned and sainted Who with grief have been acquainted, Making nations nobler, freer. In their feverish exultations, In their triumph and their yearning, In their passionate pulsations, In their words among the
Side 182 - And on the joys we shared in mortal life, — The paths which we had trod — these fountains, flowers, My new-planned cities, and unfinished towers. " But should suspense permit the foe to cry, ' Behold they tremble ! — haughty their array, Yet of their number no one dares to die
Side 226 - Where the wallowing monster spouted his foam-fountains in the sea. Let us swear an oath, and keep it with an equal mind, In the hollow Lotos-land to live and lie reclined On the hills like Gods together, careless of mankind.

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