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Style

Price per pound Sched. Species

Item of

Size
Months

TABLE
No.

No. dressing

BTC D 4 Blackback (Pseudopleuronectes

1 Round All sizes Apr-Nov 8 9 10 12 americanus)

2
Dressed

11.13

14 161 3. Fillets

1

243 264 272 30 1 Round

M
Dec-Mar lif|12137

16 2 Dressed

15.17 18 3 Fillets

3134 35. 373 5 Dab, sea (Hippoglossoides plates- 1 Round

Apr-Sept.

710 soides) 2 Dressed

每」| 10 3 Fillets

241 261 27 30 1 Round

Oct-Mar 7 81 912 2 Dressed

ll 1

12 134 16 3 Fillets

313 34

35 372 6 Yellowtail (Limanda ferruginea)

1 Round

Apr-Sept 51767 710 2 Dressed

|| 10 | 13 3 Fillets

N

24 269 27 30 1 Round

Oct Mar 78. 9. 12 2 Dressed

11 1

12 | 13 | 16 3 Fillets

313 34 35 65 Rajaf ish (Ska tes) (Genus raja)

1 Round

Jan-Der 2 3
2
Saddles
n

3241
3 Wings

9 * TABLE B--MAXIMUM PRICES FOR PRIMARY FISH SHIPPER SALES OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD. TABLE C--MAXIMUM PRI CES FOR RETAILER-OWNED COOPERATIVE SALES AND SALES BY WHOLESALERS OTHER THAN PRIMARY

FISH SHIPPER WHOLESALERS TO OTHER WHOLESALERS OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD. TABLE D--MÀXIMUM PRICES FOR CASH AND CARRY SALES OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD.

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TABLE E--MAXI MUM PRICES FOR SERVICE AND DELIVERY SALES OF FRESH FISH AND SEAFOOD.

10 Footnote 37 is added at the end of Table B in section 20 to read as follows:

37 Ceiling prices listed for these fillets apply only if they are wrapped and marked as gray sole or lemon sole, whichever is the case; otherwise the applicable ceiling prices are those listed for Item No. 3 of Schedule No. 6.

12. Footnote 15 following Table C in section 20 is amended to read as follows:

15 All footnotes made applicable to particular species of fish in Table A, except footnotes 26, 28 and 29; and footnotes 21, 22, 27 and

37 made applicable to particular species of
fish in Table B are also applicable to the
same species in Table C in section 20.

14. Footnote 16 following Table D in
section 20 is amended to read as follows:

18 All footnotes made applicable to particular species of fish in Table A, except footJotes 26, 28 and 29; footnotes 21, 22, 27 and 37 made applicable to particular species of fish in Table B; and footnote 30 made applicable to particular species of seafood in Table

are also applicable to the same species in Cable D in section 20.

16. Footnote 17 following Table E in section 20 is amended to read as follows:

17 All footnotes made applicable to particular species of fish in Table A, except footnotes 26, 28 and 29;, footnotes 21, 22, 27 and 37 made applicable to particular species of fish in Table B; and footnote 30 made applicable to particular species of seafood in Table C are also applicable to the same species in Table E in section 20.

This amendment shall become effective April 17, 1944.

SEINE CAUGHT SOCKEYE SALMON PRICES EXTENDED BY OPA REGIONAL OFFICE

In Order No. G-4 (Region VIII) under MPR-418-Fresh Fish and Seafood-effective April 15, the established maximum prices for sales of salmon, seine caught (Pacific Coast) sockeye (blueback) (Oncorhynchus nerka), in Region VIII of the Office of Price Administration were extended to cover April 15 to June 1, effective April 5.

WINTER PRICES OF MPR-507 EXTENDED THROUGH MAY

The specified cents-per-pound mark-ups used by retailers to determine their ceiling prices on sales of fresh fish and seafood during the winter months of January, February, March, and April have been extended through May, the OPA announced April 28. This action, effective April 28, was taken for these reasons: (1) Retailers will be selling some fish and seafood during the early part of May which they

acquired at the more expensive "winter" wholesale prices;
(2) While lower summer wholesale prices for Atlantic Coast fish and seafood went into effect

on April 1, the lower summer wholesale prices for Pacific Coast fish and seafood are not
effective until May 1.

The cents-per-pound mark-ups to be used during May are those under Table A of Maximum Price Regulation No. 507.

A new summer schedule, which should be announced shortly, will supersede the action of extension of the winter margins.

Amendment 3 to MPR-507--Ceiling Prices of Certain Fish and Seafood Sold at Retail--became effective April 28, 1944. Excerpts follow:

In section 26, the heading of Table A is amended to read as follows: "Cents-per-pound mark-ups over 'net cost' allowed to retailers for fresh fish and seafood covered by this regulation, by species, for the months of January, February, March, April, and May.'

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Frozen Fish Trade

HOLDINGS OF FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS DECLINE DURING MARCH

Holdings of frozen fishery products in United States cold-storage warehouses declined to 52,786,000 pounds on April 1, 24 percent below stocks held on March 1, according to data published in Current Fishery Statistics No. 121 by the Fish and Wildlife Service. The April 1 total, however, was 77 percent above that of April 1, 1943. Cod fillets and whitefish were the only principal items which showed increases in stocks as compared with a month previous, but increases over April 1, 1943 were reported for all important items except halibut, mackerel, sablefish, and whiting.

Stocks of mild-cured salmon totaled 273,000 pounds on April 1 compared with 2,925,000 pounds on hand April 1, 1943.

Holdings of Fishery Products in the United States

April 1 compared with
Item
April 1, Mar. 1, Apr.1, 5-year

March 1, April 1, 5-year 1944 1944 1943 average

1944 1943 average* Pounds Percent Percent Percent Pounds Pounds Pounds Frozen fish and shellfish: Total holdings

52,786,000 -24

+ 77

+ 47 69,857,000 29,782,000 35,845,000 Important Items: Tillets: Cod 2,090,000 +20 +382 +152

1,736,000 434,000 829,000 Haddock

1,578,000 - 20 + 23 • 22 1,975,000 1,285,000 2,031 ,000 Rosefish

934,000 -30 + 36

. 29

1,341,000 686,000 1,308,000 Flounders

1,016,000 - 3 +208 +141 1,051,000 330,000 422,000 Halibut

993,000 -58

- 34 - 40 2,344,000 1,510,000 1,655,000 Herring, sea

2,188,000 -11 +136

+126

2,453,000 926,000 968,000 Mackerel

1,568,000 -48

22 + 27 3,003,000 2,014,000 1,233,000 Millet 1,171,000 -37 +154

1,857,000 461,000 Sablofish

968,000 -27 ..ll en 20 1,321,000 1,083,000 1,210,000 Salmon

2,725,000 -43

+ 60

4,765,000 1,698,000 2,716,000 Smelt

1,653,000 - 2 + 48 + 34 1,693,000 1,116,000 1,232,000 Whiting

2,051,000 -52 23

4 4,280,000 2,672,000 2,136,000 Lake herring

2,798,000 -13 +442

+184

3,214,000 516,000 986,000 Waitafish

2,116,000 +30

+ 40 + 38 1,627,000 1,507,000 1,530,000 Shrimp

3,958,000 -39 +104

+ 39 6,449,000 1,938,000 2,854,000 Cured fish: Herring, cured

8,212,000 +18

- 39 6,945,000 6,963,000 13,444,000 Salmon, mild-cured 272,000 -372 • 91 . 92

435,000 2,925,000 3.535,000 "Since the date for reporting holdings of fishery products was changed from the 15th to the first of the month beginning Jamiary 1, 1943, data included in the "5-yr, average" consist of a combination

of figures for the two periods. •• Data not available.

*** An increase of less than one-half percent,

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+ 18

MARCH FREEZINGS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ABOVE FEBRUARY

There were 11,262,000 pounds of fishery products frozen in United States freezers during March, according to Current Fishery Statistics No. 12l published by the Fish and Wildlife Service. This was an increase of 28 percent over the amount frozen in February and 23 percent more than during March 1943. March freezings of rosefish and cod fillets, with more than a million pounds each, led all other varieties.

Freezings of Fishery Products in United States Cold-storage Plants

March compared with
Item

March
February
March 5-year February

March 5-year 1944 1944 1943 average*

1944

1943 average* Pounds Percent Percent Percent Pounds Pounds Pounds To tal fish and shellfish 11, 262,000 + 28 + 23 + 44 8,813,000 9,149,000 7,801,000

Important Items:
Fillets:
Cod

1,060,000

+238

+251 +189 314,000 302,000 367,000 Haddock

662,000 + 61

+214 - 51 411,000 211,000 1,362,000 Rosefish

1,279,000 + 68

+ 28
- 10

762,000 999,000 1,417,000 Flounders 363,000 . 20 +184 +242

455,000 128,000 106,000 Herring, sea

484,000 +238

14
+ 96

143,000 564,000 247,000 Sablefish

403,000
+143 - 37

+ 27

166,000 637,000 318,000 329,000 20

+149

410,000 213,000 132,000 Smelt

414,000 14 • 47 + 30 483,000 787,000 319,000 Whiting

318,000 + 19 - 22

+ 63

267,000 408,000 195,000 Whitefish

447,000 + 35

+ 23
+188

330,000 363,000 155,000 241,000 + 35 + 60

+ 35

548,000 462,000 548,000 Since the date for reporting freezings of fishery products was changed from the 15th to the first of the month beginning January 1, 1943, data included in the 5-yr. average" consist of a combination of figures for the two periods.

Salmon

+ 54

Shrimp

FISH STOCKS IN NEW YORK SHOW BIG DROP IN MARCH

Holdings of fishery products in New York City cold-storage warehouses continued their downward trend during March, showing on April l a decrease of 27 percent under the holdings of March 1, according to the Service's Fishery Market News office in New York. However, the 6,708,000 pounds in cold-storage were double the holdings of the corresponding date in 1943. The foremost reason for large 1944 holdings was the receipt of very large quantities of southern varieties shipped during late 1943 and early 1944 to offset the loss of northern species incurred during the stoppage of fishing in northern ports. Large amounts of the southern fish were unsold and had to be frozen and stored. Another factor was receipts of shrimp, salmon, and smelt beyond the normal demand.

The decrease in holdings from March l represents part of a seasonal downward trend which normally reaches its low point in April. From April on, holdings usually increase because of larger summer receipts of fresh fish. Leading the decreases in actual poundage were shrimp, salmon, smelt, mackerel, and sablefish in the order named. Most other species showed proportionate decreases.

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BOSTON COLD-STORAGE HOLDINGS CONTINUE DECLINE IN MARCH

Dropping 21 percent from stocks of February 23, frozen fish holdings in the Boston cold-storage warehouses amounted to 5,970,000 pounds on March 29, according to the Service's Boston Market News office. Compared to March 31, 1943, however, this was an increase of 192 percent.

Compared to February 23, cod, haddock, and rosefish fillets gained 48, 38, and 27 percent, respectively, but these gains were offset by reduced holdings. of other items. Movement of mackerel continued brisk, dropping 52 percent, while shrimp stocks decreased 29 percent. Holdings for all items showed gains compared to the abnormally low stocks on the last Wednesday in March 1943.

Holdings of dressed, H & G fillets, skuljoes, and round whiting in 13 storage plants in Maine and Massachusetts on March 25 totaled 2,451,000 pounds, a decrease of 31 percent from February 26, but an increase of 144 percent compared to March 27, 1943.

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Due to heavy withdrawals of fishery products from cold-storage warehouses for Lenten sales, holdings in Chicago on March 30 were down 11 percent from those of February 24, according to the Service's Market News office in Chicago. Most important items reflected the decline during the five-week period, except lake trout, whitefish and cod fillets. These were received from Canada, already frozen, in unusually large quantities. The total at the end of March was over twice as large as that of a year earlier, with fresh-water species, in particular, contributing to the increase.

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Important Items:
Blue pike and sauger*
Lake herring
Lake trout
Pickerel
Whitefish
Yellow perch
Yellow pike
Fillets:

Cod

Rosefish
Halibut
Whiting
Shrimp
Squid
Includes fillets of these species.

1,107,000

569,000
593,000

186,000
1,102,000

155,000
161,000

+ 173 + 306 + 197

148 + 209 + 252 + 160

+118
- 26

- 35

1,468,000
652,000
299,000
190,000
504,000
210,000
247,000
162,000
170,000
536,000
327,000
557,000
281,000

405,000 140,000 200,000

75,000 356,000 44,000 62,000

8,000 136,000 331,000 397,000 254,000 8,000

+3,375

278,000 136,000 280,000 216,000 121,000 262,000

+ 72
. 20
- 48

34 78

15 46

52 +3,175

CANADIAN APRIL 1 COLD-STORAGE HOLDINGS 38 PERCENT MORE THAN IN 1943

Holdings of frozen fresh fish in Canadian cold-storage plants on April 1 totaled 18,416,000 pounds, an increase of 38 percent over stocks on April 1, 1943, according to preliminary data furnished by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Large increases were shown in stocks of cod and haddock fillets, salmon, whitefish, and tullibee, Compared with a month earlier, April 1 holdings declined 13 percent.

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Frozen smoked fish stocks on April 1 amounted to 1,364,000 pounds--53 percent more than holdings on the same date a year earlier and 8 percent less than those in storage on March 1, 1944.

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Freezings of fresh fishery products in Canada during March showed a decrease of 19 percent as compared with March 1943, according to preliminary data released by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. A total of 3,482,000 pounds of fresh fish was frozen during the month of which cod and haddock fillets accounted for 2,049,000 pounds. March freezings of smoked fish, which totaled 1,013,000 pounds, were 10 percent less than those of March 1943.

Freezings of Fishery Products in Canadian Cold-storage Plants

March

Mar. compared with February
Item

1944
Feb. 1944 March 1943

1944
Pounds

Percent Percent Pounds
Frozen fresh fish
To tal freezings

3,482,000

+ 10

· 19 3,170,000

March

1943 Pounds

4,323,000

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Frozen smoked fish
Total freezings

Important Items:
Fillets; cod, haddock, etc.
Sea herring kippers

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17 + 30

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